Want to see all your patients sooner than 48 hours? Easy, simply don't schedule out more than 2 days.

It may be far off, but researchers are working on it:

"These can restore hair to a bald man, teeth to those in need and skin to scarred patients."

The use of stem cells to regenerate tissue is believed to hold promise because stem cells can be nudged to develop into specialized cell types. And some researchers have turned an eye toward stem cells for this very purpose.

Lawyers are withdrawing from these cases, citing a lack of evidence and patient misinterpretation:

Hospital officials said they sympathize with patients but believe misunderstandings might have given the impression of a cleanliness problem. For example, Thompson said one client complained that nurses weren't washing their hands, and were instead using a sort of "mousse" -- which actually was a hand sanitizer.
(via Dr. Wes)

This is how US primary care is seen by many medical students. It's sad to say that they're not too far from the truth:

The climate for primary care doctors, in as much as this medstudent can understand, seems fraught with patients wanting tests or specialists. Unfortunately the idea that a primary care doctor can control a lot of problems *without* extensive testing or referrals is becoming foreign ...

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Wishful thinking that something like this would work. As long as someone else is footing the bill, many won't care about the macro-effects of their medical decisions:

Proscriptions (sic) could be aided by legislation demanding Doctors inform Patients in percentage terms the likely benefit of such Drug use; most truly sick Patients can understand a Doctor who says this Drug will make you feel 10% better at $12/day. They ...

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Fascinating poisoning by a rare, exotic compound.

This time, fetus in fetu. A boy born with a fetus in his stomach:

Doctors carried out a scan on the boy's mother shortly before she gave birth on November 15 in the southern city of Temuco and noticed the 4-inch-long fetus inside the boy's abdomen.

It had limbs and a partially developed spinal cord but no head and stood no chance of survival, doctors said.

Popularized by the $4 Wal-mart and Target plans. Good news for patients. Bad news for Big Pharma.

John Mack suggests that Pfizer look at this opportunity:

I think smoking cessation support is a perfect application for Web 2.0 (aka, social networking) technology. In fact, it has been done before with another smoking cessation drug . . .

. . . The particular precedent I am thinking of used online bulletin boards where smokers who were attempting to quit could share stories, experience and encourage one ...

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It's booming, and fraught with fraud:

The cost of a donated egg has soared from about $2,500 a few years ago to as much as $35,000 in some cases as lack of regulatory oversight has enabled a new breed of marketers called "egg hunters" to act as Internet brokers between recipients and donors, said Dr. Drew Moffitt, co-medical director of the Arizona Reproductive Medicine Specialists, an infertility practice.

Indeed, ...

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Always entertaining Charity Doc explains a none-to-uncommon occurrence in the ER.

How by bowing down to short-sighted patient interest pressures the NHS may be harming others:

Funding the drug would mean 355 patients not receiving post-surgery treatment - 16 of whom would be cured, or around 200 patients not receiving palliative chemotherapy.

The researchers say there is little long-term data on the clinical benefits and potential dangers of taking Herceptin, whereas the established treatments have been shown to be ...

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The plaintiff is suing for negligence claiming her husband gave her HPV: "People probably aren't thinking about potential legal liability when they're having casual sex."

Soft-selling Chantix

Pfizer's approach on this smoking cessation drug that is not covered by many health insurance plans. It goes for about $112 a pak (it comes at a starter month pak followed by two continuing month paks). About the same cost of a monthly supply of cigarettes.

A doctor-run HMO in Florida goes belly-up - probably physicians don't have the business sense to compete with the major insurers:

"We were either nincompoops who didn't know how to run a business, or high-quality healthcare just isn't affordable in today's world," said Julio C. Pita Jr., a Miami doctor who was one of the founders. "It could be a little of both. . . . I'm immensely disappointed."

Think polypharmacy is a problem of the elderly? Think again:

Bottles of psychiatric medications fill the shelves. Stephen, 15, takes the antidepressants Zoloft and Desyrel for depression, the anticonvulsant Lamictal to moderate his moods and the stimulant Focalin XR to improve concentration. Jacob, 14, takes Focalin XR for concentration, the anticonvulsant Depakote to moderate his moods, the antipsychotic Risperdal to reduce anger and the antihypertensive Catapres to induce ...

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Medicare price negotiations is the threat. Big Pharma is counting on a presidential veto as it's last line of defense.

Medscape asks a group of neurologists:

The top 5 most bothersome patient behaviors from most to least were the following: no show for appointment, verbally abusive with your staff, poor compliance with medications or treatment, late for appointment, and do not know the medications that they are taking. Of the 30 items, those behaviors as well as answering cell phones during office visits and unnecessary phone calls after hours were ...

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Known as ectopia cordis, an infant successfuly underwent surgery recently.

I thought it was a joke at first too:

An Israeli university is taking the notion that laughter is the best medicine seriously, setting up a Bachelor of Arts degree in medical clowning to help legitimize the profession.

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