It costs about $20,000:

The Chinese want boys, and the Canadians want girls. If they have enough money, they come to the United States to choose the sex of their babies.

Well-off foreign couples are getting around laws banning sex selection in their home countries by coming to American soil "” where it's legal "” for medical procedures that can give them the boy, or girl, they want.

A lot of factors are in play here:

David Llewellyn, an Atlanta attorney who specializes in circumcision cases, is helping the father'Â’s attorneys without a fee. He called the surgery "a bizarre American custom." . . .

. . . Tracy Rizzo, the mother's attorney, said religion, not medicine, is the father's concern. Rizzo said the father disagrees with circumcision because he resents the fact that his ex-wife ...

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The "Peeometer"

It's used to measure hydration:

Yorkshire Water have developed "peeometers" to help members of the public gauge how well they are performing against the ideal.

The organization has urged men to use Men's Health Week to make a resolution to check their hydration levels on a regular basis.

A spokesman said men in particular needed to be encouraged to drink water.

Yes, it's causing controversy:

"Naughty America: The Game" pairs a multiplayer, interactive game with the opportunity to be, well, naughty with other people playing from their own homes, using webcams all over the country. (Players can even agree to meet offline).

More on out-of-control prescription drug abuse:

It's a culture with its own lingo: Bowls and baggies of random pills often are called "trail mix," and on Internet chat sites, collecting pills from the family medicine chest is called "pharming."

Carol Falkowski, director of research communications for the Hazelden Foundation, says young abusers of prescription drugs also have begun using the Internet to share "recipes" for getting high. Some ...

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Can it be another pharma-invented disease?

Sounds like a con, right? Yet it's exactly what's happening right now with Restless Legs Syndrome, Road Rage Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder and even Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Every one of these is utterly bogus. Completely fictitious. Designed for one sinister purpose: To sell drugs to people who don't need them.

As reported in one news story, "Experts claim IED is caused ...

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Hey, I learned something new today. Donating one pint of blood burns off 650 calories, or equivalent to a 40 minute run. (via Gordon's Notes)

Yes, ERs are in crisis. A favorite topic here. A major part of the problem can be traced to poor primary care access and "defensive medicine". Let me elaborate:

1) Lack of access
Lack of primary care incentives for medical students and providers = dwindling primary care access = patients going to the ER for "routine" or non-emergent care = ER overcrowding = eventual collapse. Simple.

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Most physicians wash their hands after seeing a patient - just because it wasn't personally witnessed, doesn't mean it didn't happen. Many sinks and alcohol-based cleansers are outside of the patient's view in many hospitals. This lawyer urges everyone to speak up:

The law can do only so much to address the wrongdoing. Proving causation is often extremely challenging, and few relish the prospect of suing a ...

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Well, that is just one more reason why he should have quit smoking:

A hospital patient was trapped for more than three days in a broken lift after sneaking away from his bed for a cigarette.

Relatives, hospital staff and police searched for days after wheelchair-bound Karlheinz Schmidt, 68, went missing from the Charite Hospital in Berlin.

It was only when technicians were finally called out to fix ...

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Finally, more acceptance for open-access scheduling. In this fee-for-service world, practices are adapting to the fact that quantity pays the bills.

I've been catching up on season one during the last few weeks - and I've been wondering the same thing. But, they're always on the lookout for unheard-of, rare diseases:

There's one medical mystery the creator of House never wants to solve.

Namely, what does he do when he runs out of diseases for his cranky, cane-bound hero to diagnose?

"That was a concern," admits executive ...

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More sad stats from Canada.

Another way reimbursement continues to be under fire:

But Dr. Mesoras, the Aetna official, said his company had been able to use transparency in its favor during negotiations. In a few cases, doctors demanding high rates for certain procedures have backed down after learning that their relative reimbursements will be visible on the Aetna Web site.

I happen to agree that an individual mandate is the best solution for universal healthcare.

The controversy surrounding LifeSharers:

So far, 4,526 people from all 50 states have joined LifeSharers, pledging to donate their organs only to other members when they die. If there is no suitable match, a person's organs can be donated to a nonmember.

Undis believes restricting organs only to people who are willing to donate their own is the fairest way to distribute precious organs, while others balk at ...

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A patient chronicles his experience with a recent prostate cancer diagnosis.

And promptly shoots-down one reason why "Medicare for all" won't work.

Some are wondering whether these "fast-food" clinics cater to the rich and suburban:

More than a dozen AMA delegates testified before a committee Sunday, raising numerous concerns, including whether retailers were cherry-picking patients in suburban areas.

"I don't think you will find any of these clinics in the inner city," Dr. Arthur Snow, an AMA delegate and family physician from Shawnee Mission, Kan., not far from Walgreens' targeted ...

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The Washington Post looks closer and doesn't see an end anytime soon:

Why should we be surprised? This generation is the one we have pushed to get into the best high schools and colleges, to have the best grades and résumés. Computer nerds are culture heroes, SAT scores are measures of our worth and the Ivy League is Valhalla. Hermione Granger in "Harry Potter" is a heroine despite being ...

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