Bilal Abdulla

Portrait of the physician-terrorist.

A nurse feels that the EMTALA allows ER's to turn away non-emergent cases. Why don't they do it more often then?

What is interesting is that the act also states: "If the patient does not have an "emergency medical condition", the statute imposes no further obligation on the hospital".
So the question becomes why do we treat all of these people, 90% of whom do not have an "emergent ...

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A patient asks a chiropractor about her abdominal pain during her treatment. His answer gets him in trouble.

Breast self-exams

There is no data to support it reduces mortality from breast cancer.

This should be mandatory in medical school. This eye-opening experience really demonstrates the lamb-like, idealistic naivety of American medical students today.

Many drug reps think so:

Physicians know that all the big pharma companies have their hands tied and that speakers can't talk off-label anymore or use their own slides. Why would they want to come out and hear exactly what we're telling them at every call and lunch & learn: essentially the company line, which is what the slide decks are. Unless they really want a free dinner, it's not ...

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Dr. Crippen tries to make sense of it:

. . . let us hope that there is not going to be yet another wave of racism in the NHS.

I fear, however, that the gutter press and the sleazy media will indeed fuel the flames of racism. I fear there will be a backlash against doctors from the middle-east and Asia, and most of our Moslem doctors. Not all ...

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Is there a connection?

Almost overnight, health care has become a security issue.

The news from London and Glasgow brings a striking reminder that Al Qaeda is willing to exploit any national weakness.

In the case of the British, it's an ongoing physician shortage brought on by the inherit shortcomings of their government-run health care system. The shortage allowed Al Qaeda operatives to legally enter the country ...

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That's the current trend:

Since 1996-97, a 40 percent increase in the female primary care physician supply has helped to offset a 16 percent decline in the male primary care physician supply relative to the U.S. population. At the same time, primary care physicians' incomes have lost ground to both inflation and medical and surgical specialists' incomes. And women in primary care face a 22 percent income gap relative ...

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Silence is taking a priority.

Expect this to be seen at a drug exhibit in the latest physician convention:

It's labeled after many schizophrenic patients' descriptions of what it's like to live with this disease "” many say the experience of schizophrenia is "like having a storm in their mind," said Padina. Mindstorm was designed to provide mental health professionals, physicians, law enforcement officials and patients' families with an experience similar to that of ...

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ER time guarantees

ER's are responding to wait times by hiring more physicians. That's good. But some are equating time with quality. Is that true?

Companies are trying to take advantage of the pro-screening bias in the public. Charging patients for a "screening" EKG is pretty close to fraud, as an EKG by itself is pretty insensitive for many heart diseases:

In early June, Rae Ann Jacek, president of a parent teacher organization in Chelmsford, Mass., and a member of the town's school board, plunked down almost $300 for heart tests for her three ...

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Is the P4P concept fatally flawed? It doesn't seem like it matters, as it's moving forwards anyways:

n the United Kingdom, for instance, researchers found that the national P4P program introduced in 2004 motivated general practitioners to improve care by making better use of previously underused information technology and multidisciplinary teams. Bruce Guthrie, MB BChir, PhD, of the University of Dundee, in Dundee, Scotland, who presented a study ...

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Nothing brings out the passionate debate like the controversy of PSA. It is well-known that there is no consensus evidence showing a mortality benefit to obtaining a screening PSA. An upcoming trial is supposed to more definitively answer the question, but recruiting patients may be difficult:

Many are awaiting the results of a multiyear trial by the National Cancer Institute and other medical organizations called the Prostate, ...

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They are much-needed purveyors of unbiased drug information. However, they are outmanned and outgunned, so PhRMA is not worried.

It's much easier to push reform through in other countries:

Rosoff notes that in countries like France, where the political system includes strong executive power, public debate is less of a factor. In a sense, the democratic nature of the political process in the U.S. is a major impediment to the launching of major reforms. "It takes a lot of hot air to blow up a balloon," he says, ...

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The LA Times with a profile on the suspected ringleader to the failed attacks last week.

See how these two ideological opposites butt heads.

Many would like this day to come to the US:

President Hugo Chavez said Tuesday his government will nationalize Venezuela's privately owned hospitals and clinics if they fail to reduce health care costs.

"If the owners of the private clinics don't want to obey the laws, then the private clinics will be nationalized," Chavez said in a nationally televised speech. "They will become part of the public health service."

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