Welcome to the Anniversary Edition of Grand Rounds, the weekly carnival of the medical blogosphere. This is my fourth time hosting, and I want to thank Nick Genes for the honor of kicking off the 4th year of Grand Rounds.

Congratulations to all of you for making the healthcare blogosphere what it is today. Informative. Opinionated. Dynamic. Controversial. ...

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Both Medgadget and PsychCentral write about exploiting a vulnerability in physician-only site Sermo:

In the physician community, there's been a fair amount of buzz about a physician's-only community (or "social network," if you prefer) called Sermo. I was curious as to how strong their registration system was to prevent non-physicians from subscribing to the service, which is free and open to all physicians that have either an M.D. ...

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With suppositories and baths in witch hazel. After the colon cancer was diagnosed, treatment continued with injections of insulin and laetrile.

The OB crisis hits NYC

Only a matter of time before it affects every single one of you:

Tamer Seckin, who had spent 20 years working as an obstetrician-gynecologist in Brooklyn, was faced with the prospect of a 14 percent hike in his malpractice-insurance rate, so he decided four months ago to stop delivering high-risk babies.

"Just today, I had to tell a woman I'd been treating for years that when she goes into ...

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Slate explains.

Buying a kidney

This patient is traveling to the Philippines, where it's legal to buy organs:

For almost three years, Ms Pascual's health has been steadily deteriorating as she waits on dialysis. The 40-year-old and her fiance, Brent Jones, who are getting married in November, fear if they don't take drastic steps she will become too sick for a transplant or die.

They are planning to go to the Philippines, where it ...

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A study correlates malpractice caps with decreasing rates of the uninsured.

Beginner’s curse

It never fails, says Sid Schwab:

If I didn't know better, I'd say there's a curse: when a new surgeon arrives in town, he or she will have a very weird or embarrassing case within a short time, while all eyes are still upon him/her. I've seen it repeatedly.

Information is power

Dr. Rob on how physicians need to take back control of information from the insurance companies.

Good luck, and the problem is about to get much worse. Thank declining physician reimbursements:

According to the Oregon Medical Association, 23.7 percent of primary care practices in the state are already closed to new Medicare patients, up from 11.8 percent in 2004. Only one in four of the physicians surveyed by the OMA said they would continue to accept new Medicare patients if rates went down as projected ...

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Doctors whose personalities that rate "poorly" are required to undergo a coaching session.

Choosing an antidepressant

What goes through a psychiatrist's mind?

Are doctor complaints drug seekers' trump card?

Anthony Youn analyzes his various plastic surgeries.

Specialist shortage

A shortage of physicians hits more than primary care. (via a reader tip)

ER crisis in Tuscon

Hospitals are starting to get it in the wake of Tuscon's ER crisis. To get specialists to take call, they are opening up their pocketbooks. It's about time that physicians take charge of their profession:

In Tucson, paying a single specialist to cover the ER can cost up to $1,000 a night. Hospital CEOs estimate paying for adequate specialty coverage "” neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons, hand surgeons, vascular surgeons, ...

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The story of Inn-House Doctor, another business model that's sprouted up to meet a demand:

Doctor delivery is one of many new approaches springing up to address the demand for faster, more convenient medical care. Walk-in clinics are opening in places like pharmacies, retail stores and airport terminals, though not everyone thinks this is a good idea. The desire of consumers for better access to a doctor has also ...

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Pretty nasty. Thanks, Scalpel.

A new style for the iPod generation of physicians:

Let us be the latest but certainly not the last blog to spill a few pixels over Jay Parkinson, M.D., of Brooklyn. The good doctor and scarily accomplished photographer . . . has an offer to take care of you for $500 a year. And most of the time, you'll be meeting online.

Parkinson, 31 and freshly licensed, has got ...

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Can you decipher this prescription? The dosages were the tip-off for me. (via Dr. RW)

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