Seems like the suggested solution is a continued low threshold for ordering tests:

While researchers acknowledged that most claims involved several factors, they said major ones included mistakes by doctors: failure to order appropriate diagnostic tests . . .

. . . Doctors not involved with the study said the findings highlight the fact that physicians - and patients - need to err on the side of caution when ...

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The bizarre medical mystery of a 12-year old girl who literally is stuck as a 9-month old baby:

For 12 years the family has changed her nappies, rocked her to sleep and taken turns to give her cuddles. On school days, she is carried gently into a yellow bus and taken to a special school for handicapped children. Her condition has no name and doctors are unaware of any other ...

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Going the extra mile:

When leukemia patient Brandon Meyer asked his doctor for permission to go skydiving, he was surprised by the response.

"I jokingly said that he could go when he got through his more intensive chemotherapy, but only if he brought me," said Dr. Steve Ambrusko, a hematology/oncology fellow at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. "Lo and behold, he called me on that."

Sad but true. With so many patients on multiple-drug regimens, some medications will be more important than others.

A responsible narcotic-using pain patient writes:

I no longer go to emergency rooms for help with any pain. They might fix my broken bone but then ask, "How many hospitals do you go to to try to get extra drugs?" One ER doctor told me to "go home and play your little drug games."
Problem is, for every responsible narcotic user, you have another hundred who play the drug ...

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And thus another example of letting health costs run rampant:

The rise in cancer-drug prices is a microcosm of broader trends pushing up health care costs nationally. Despite decades of efforts by governments and insurers to restrain costs, patients continue to want the newest "” and most expensive "” drugs and medical devices. And doctors and the health care industry have little reason to keep costs in check, because ...

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Again, problems can be traced down to the reimbursement system:

Dr. Frieden and others argue that doctors cannot or will not take the time to take all the steps required by New York law to test their patients. "They have a huge number of things that they're supposed to cover," he said, while pressure from insurers to see more patients means that "they're scrunching down to seven or eight ...

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Dr. Centor sums it up:

Many physicians thus avoid email communication as another cost of time. The excuses against email communication are actually quite lame. There are secure methods for patient communication. Most insurers do not pay for email. Physician avoidance is mostly about money.

If we do not address the financial inequities among physician activities, then we cannot take advantage of technology to improve care. Our reimbursement ...

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Sid Schwab talks from a surgeon's perspective:

In a nutshell, it comes down to this: when there's a lump you can feel, diagnostic imaging (Xrays, ultrasound, etc.) is a waste of time and money. OK, that's a bit over the top: you get needed information about the rest of the breast, and the other side, which will come into play at some point. But getting a bunch of studies ...

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Dr. Charles talks about his lucky patient.

Update:
Link fixed.

So much for that threat to doctors - they didn't even last a year in Portland, OR:

Rite Aid Corp.'s first experiment offering health clinics inside its stores ended when the clinic operator decided it could not turn a profit.

Take Care Health Systems told Rite Aid that it would close its last seven health clinics on Friday, less than a year after opening 10 of them in Rite ...

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Another "ER is too busy, I had to wait" story. Maybe if more of these get published, something can be done about it.

At least they acknowledge a shortage as well as reimbursement issues. More than can be said Stateside.

. . . try Baghdad.

Another jury sending a message. The incident involves giving Glipizide, a diabetes medicine. Noted in the case, was the Oxycontin-addicted pharmacist who stole 86,000 pills over an eight-year period.

Occurring daily at an ER near you. The main reason why health care costs are skyrocketing.

Demand increases, shortages develop, quality goes down. The road where Medicare is taking us.

Thanks to various commenters from the prior post for the links.

Apparently the patient didn't want any student touching her. More details:

Mullins sued because several weeks before the procedure, her surgeon, Dr. Marvin E. Eastlund provided her with an informed consent document on which she indicated she did not want health care students in the operating room.

"Whose responsibility is it when a patient ...

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Medical care in Belgium

Certainly a world of difference compared to what happens here:

This was the beginning of a series of happy discoveries about medical care in Belgium. Healthcare in the US is mired in bureaucracy and competing interests and concerns about liability. It's a complex system that both doctors and patients hate for different reasons. The typical doctor must employ a receptionist to handle calls and appointments, an office manager to handle ...

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Chiropractic quackery

So much for time travel being a valid therapy:

State regulators had been investigating Dr. James Burda of Athens, who said he could take care of anyone, anywhere by reaching back in time to when the injury occurred.

Burda said he discovered the skill six years ago when he hurt his own foot while driving. He said he gave the pain a command to stop and it went away.

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