What a dog of a drug. An advisory panel said it should not be used for bronchitis or sinusitis.

A surplus is better than a shortage - but not always:

While experts say an excess is better than a shortage, too large a surplus could hamper the government's goal of steadily increasing the production and use of flu vaccines. Because makers, distributors, doctors and health departments lose money from vaccine they cannot sell to patients, they may be discouraged from making or ordering as much in coming years ...

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The policy wonks are on the case: Matthew Holt, Joe Paduda and Ezra Klein.

EHRs in the real world

A doctor gives us the (lack of) incentives to convert:

Start with the cost of more than $37,000, plus some $14,000 per year on maintenance. Then there are the weeks out of practice to learn the new system and the slowdown while everyone becomes familiar with using it. Then add, as Technology Editor Ken Terry mentions, that the payers will simply lower their rates to counteract the improved documentation and ...

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Pre-paid primary care

Concierge care for the masses. A look at an emerging primary care model:

These days, the soft-spoken, but formidable family physician is mixing it up in the role of healthcare reformer. Three years ago, Wood began advertising that his clinic would provide unlimited primary and urgent care for a monthly fee of $83 for an individual, $125 for a family. Wood immediately ran afoul of the state insurance commissioner, ...

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The kidneys of a longtime friend, scheduled to be given to a patient, instead is given to a stranger. The patient sues the donor network.

Serial healthcare killers

Since 1970, over 2,000 patients died at the hands of suspected serial killers in healthcare settings.

A study published at the BMJ:

Higher IQ at the age of 10 years was associated with an increased likelihood of being vegetarian at the age of 30. This relation was partly accounted for by better education and higher occupational social class, but it remained statistically significant after adjusting for these factors.

More quotes from the ER at Trench Doc.

Predictably, trial lawyers aren't happy about the decision.

A recent NEJM study correlates the time spent in doing a colonoscopy to polyps found:

One factor distinguishing the physicians who found many adenomas from those who found few was the amount of time spent examining the colon, according to the study, in which the gastroenterologists kept track of the time for each exam and how many polyps they found.

They discovered that those who slowed down ...

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A tale of two Indias

They are fighting two problems from opposite ends of the spectrum: obesity and undernutrition.

Worlds away, OBs in China are going through the same problems as those Stateside:

The true situation can be more serious. Fearing bad publicity or regulatory punishment, medical staff often favor out-of-court settlements, the amount of which is usually proportional to the ferocity of the trouble-makers who make complaint and threaten to file suit.

The smallest injury is enough to lead to a big medical conflict, given parents' rising ...

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Ketek: "A time bomb"

There are reports of liver failure, there is really no excuse to use this drug - especially since there are so many safer alternatives available.

They are winning Vioxx lawsuits, have the HPV vaccine, and the future is looking brighter.

Senator Johnson’s stroke

shadowfax with an analysis. Looks like the surgery he had was for an AVM.

Especially prevalent amongst the offensive and defensive linemen:

Bigger has long been considered better on the football field, especially among linemen, who dole out and absorb hits as blockers and tacklers. But health experts worry about what happens at the end of the athletes' playing days. Unless they commit to a lifestyle of nutrition and exercise, all that muscle could turn to fat "” and the fat could turn into ...

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A physician doesn't feel guilty for accepting pharma gifts:

There remains one problem"”I don't feel that much shame for my former behavior, at least the money-grubbing part. I just don't think that the financial hanky-panky between drug companies and doctors constitutes the central crisis in American medicine or, for that matter, the most corrosive aspect of the entire messy doctor-drug relationship. They need us; we need them. We do ...

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The CDC composing cutesy songs. (via Medpundit)

Studies show it's only $3,000 per year. Most uninsured choose not to have it:

As Congress revisits health insurance next year, we must reach a national consensus that families earning $25,000 or more can spend $3,000 on catastrophic health insurance premiums.

If they don't choose to buy it for themselves, middle-class taxpayers should not be forced to buy it for them. When politicians come to understand this, ...

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