A handy guide for patients when they see studies discussed in the media.

Make sure your informed consent forms are clear enough:

The informed consent form described the surgery as a "lumbar diskectomy and fusion with iliac crest bone graft + 'Steffe plates.' " During the surgery the physicians removed bone fragments and grafted the plaintiff's own bone to his spine. They also used cadaver bone as dowels for the bone graft. The grafted bone didn't fuse and the patient's workers' compensation carrier ...

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Walk-ins

Love 'em or hate 'em, people who show up without an appointment can help or hurt your practice:

. . . walk-ins are a fact of life in office-based medicine, so rules to deal with them are essential. Walk-in policies will vary from practice to practice, and even from physician to physician within a practice, depending on who's on call, who's looking for a heftier patient roster, and what sort ...

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She was born with osteogenesis imperfecta:

Little Sarah Morrison is so delicate she can never be hugged by her parents and she can break a bone just by sneezing.

Before she was even born, Sarah suffered 30 rib fractures and doctors said she would live just two days.

But the one-in-a-million baby, who has brittle-bone disease, will defy expectations when she celebrates her first birthday ...

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ADHD DTC ads

Targeting the back to school crowd.

Hate waiting at the doctor's office? Don't blame the players, advocate to change the way physicians are paid:

As long as we are paid per visit rather than for our time, we will have this problem. Usually patients have no choice, because there are few good alternatives. These problems are common to most physicians.

For many specialties, we do not have enough physicians - so the "competitor" ...

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And 9 other things that doctors like to hear from patients.

Orac doesn't mince words with his take on Medicare's poorly thought-out plan:

It would make a lot more sense to set standards for the maximum rates of these particular infectious complications for each hospital based on the mix of patients and the rates that could reasonably be expected if the best evidence-based infection control guidelines are used. Hospitals that exceed that rate by, say, two standard deviations (or even less) ...

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Followup to yesterday's story on doctor-staffed retail clinics. A sly move by the hospital to generate revenue increase admissions?

They will be able to increase admissions to the hospitals, since these pharmacy docs have admitting privileges. So if they lose it on one end, they'll get it back on the other. Good for them. It's this kind of entrepreneurial thinking that makes me proud to be an ...

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The Physician Executive with some answers:

I suspect, while there are some bad apples in the barrel, the majority are skating trying to cover their overhead, payroll, malpractice and hopefully come close to the national average of $150,000 in income.

Going bare

keagirl with her thoughts on the matter:

I recently talked to someone who has "gone bare", and they have posted a sign in their clinic saying that this medical group does NOT carry malpractice insurance. If patients have a problem with that, they will most likely go somewhere else. I'm guessing that this will help weed out patients who may have litiginous intents, but I am also guessing that ...

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Hospital credit cards

The WSJ Health Blog looks at the fine print.

Head: NC/AT

Count on Dr. Rob to delve further into what normocephalic, atraumatic really means.

Instant medicine

A list of procedures that give instant and dramatic relief to the patient.

So rampant in Appalachia, that "delivery companies had to add trucks to their routes."

Suck it up, says an ivory-tower academic:

Nonetheless, even the best hospitals will have an occasional misstep. There is no reasonable way to make exceptions to the new policy, so hospitals will have to live with it.

Yawn. The problems with this approach have been well-documented on this blog.

Macrodactyly

Wow.

A compromise - having physicians staff retail clinics:

The Duane Reade retail clinics, advertised at the stores as "Duane Reade Walk-In Medical Care," function as private medical practices that lease space from Duane Reade. Despite the name, doctors own the clinics, which have low overhead costs in a city where setting up a practice can be wildly prohibitive.

Doctors' groups said they had fewer objections to doctor-run retail ...

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