More are not willing to take the risks of specialty call in the ER. So hospitals are starting to show them the money:

Until recently, specialists accepted on-call shifts in return for admitting privileges. But many now expect to be compensated for keeping their beepers on during nights and weekends. The change in the relationship between specialists and hospitals is being debated in the medical community, with ...

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How to buy an M.D.

Two "anti-aging" osteopaths find a way to add M.D. after their names. Are they afraid of not selling enough books with their D.O. degree?

Both men received medical degrees in 1998 from the Central American Health Sciences University in Belize, without, they acknowledged, ever having studied in the country. Dr. Klatz and Dr. Goldman say through their lawyer that they earned their medical degrees with transfer credit from ...

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"Just admit the patient to medicine."

Been there, done that. It's the only service in the hospital that can't refuse admissions. Scalpel with another example.

Wear your seatbelts

Or else:

There are two major routes that unrestrained persons take in a front-end MVA (Motor Vehicle Accident). Up-and-over or down-and-under (AKA "submarining"). With up-and-over, the upper body launches forward and up. The head strikes the windshield. (This produces the classic "windshield star") Your injuries here include concussion, scalp laceration, and various brain bleeds. You can suspect fractured cervical vertebrae (and if you have a fracture with compromise to ...

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Believe it or not, one point me and Ezra Klein agree on. Even with his socialist views, he admits that cost-sharing is inevitable. Finally, a bit of reality is sinking into the liberal thinkers:

But even though conservatives have embraced a crude, even regressive, form of cost-sharing, there's a kernel of insight to their account. In 1965, the average American received a bit under $1,000 in health ...

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Childhood obesity

Solutions to a pressing health problem are fighting an uphill battle:

But across the country, the new rules are also sparking a backlash among parents, children and even some teachers and school officials. The efforts often draw derision for being too extreme and demonizing children. Arkansas, the first state to pass legislation requiring schools measure students' body-mass index, backtracked last month and now allows parents to refuse the assessment. The ...

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Orac takes stock of his critical injuries. Wear your seatbelts people:

Corzine required seven units of blood and needed to undergo surgery to fix his femur. Even if he does not suffer complications from his chest injury, such as pneumonia and ARDS, he will likely not be able to walk again for months, and will require more surgeries to wash out the damaged and devitalized tissue and to complete the ...

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Blogs are exclusively responsible for the current AstraZeneca scandal:

Where was the mainstream media in all this? Almost entirely absent. But already, the episode signals a new chapter in the way the pharmaceutical industry is being scrutinized and to whom drugmakers must answer, like it or not. Blogs, whether run by whistleblowers, marketers, patients or journalists, are a new front. And there's no going back.
Peter Rost and Ed ...

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They come up with an asinine medical dispensing rule. Shadowfax and Kim at Emergiblog vent. Once again, those that make the rules don't live in the real world.

VA’s EHR

The strongest point of the VA system is their EHR. I used it extensively during medical school, and really is the only feature that should be copied from the VA system. DB and #1 Dinosaur comment on a Washington Post article.

The NY Times on hip resurfacing, a growing alternative to hip replacement. UnitedHealth apparently is behind the curve:

He said his insurer, United Healthcare, initially denied coverage because he wanted to go out of the approved doctors' network and that several of the United representatives whom he spoke with on the phone were confused because they had never heard of the procedure. United eventually provided oral approval. Mr. ...

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It's seems inevitable that out-of-pocket expenses will soon be a reality in the UK's health care system.

If you thought the price of prescription drugs, you're missing more important factors. Charlie Baker explains.

Paul Levy notices an interesting trend of patient falls at his hospital.

Washington's pharmacy board unanimously ruled that pharmacists have a duty to fill prescriptions despite any personal objections.

Ezra Klein thinks so, but his arguments get taken apart.

A clinical trial studying bariatric surgery as a radical treatment for type 2 diabetes has commenced in Europe:

Instead, investigators have found, bariatric surgery, independent of weight loss, alters metabolic factors such as the hunger-regulating peptide hormone ghrelin (as a result of decreased gastric mass). In addition, bariatric surgery results in increases in peptide YY which has an effect on satiety, and GLP-1, which affects gastric motility and beta-cell mass.

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A story about a passenger with chest pain. The airline uses medical advice from a service provided by an ER in Phoenix:

MedLink is a 24-hour medical-help hotline in the emergency room of Good Samaritan Hospital in Phoenix. A doctor provides recommendations for any inflight medical emergency or medical condition when advice is necessary. They assume responsibility for the actions of a Flight Attendant or ...

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It affects the statue of limitations, according to Dr. Wes:

In Illinois, the minute a doctor acknowledges that there was a problem, a hidden clock starts that lasts three years. You see defense attorneys know about the bungled system of justice here in the US, and once an admission of responsibility about an injury occurs, plaintiffs have three years to have the case tried.

Michael Hebert on the annual dance we do with Congress on the Medicare fee cuts:

There are ways to encourage doctors to be more cost efficient. Giving them a salary cut every time medical costs rise faster than the price of rice is not one of them.

And anyway, it hasn't worked. Medical costs continue to outstrip GDP growth regardless of the threat of cuts. This is not ...

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