It's really up to the physicians to accept that internet health is here to stay:

Is it fanciful to suggest that the reason doctors are so resentful of the internet, and so suspicious of our ability to use it responsibly, is because it excludes them even further? Because it facilitates access to knowledge which, as little as a decade ago, was more or less their exclusive province?

More on the affirmative action scandal in India. (via a reader tip)

US News on ACOG's fight for Plan B. Someone's got to put science back into the FDA:

Despite a doctor's orders, a pharmacist can decide not to dispense the contraceptive based on moral or religious beliefs. Fine. But there must be an alternative pharmacist or pharmacy to fill the order, or else the conscientious objectors are imposing their beliefs on a woman who then becomes powerless to exercise her ...

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This physician takes a hard-line:

A conscientious allergist I know refuses to treat patients with asthma who don't follow his recommendations for keeping flare-ups at bay with preventive medication.

"I don't want anyone dying on my watch," he explains. "I'd rather devote my time to patients who do their best to prevent asthma attacks."

NYT on the fall of a celebrity doctor: "He recounts how his surgical skills made him an expert knitter of hats and scarves for his fellow inmates . . ."

Resident physicians have also gone on strike in support.

Go read part one and two.

Sad:

A girl is to become Britain's youngest mother after becoming pregnant at 11.

The girl smokes 20 cigarettes a day despite being eight months' pregnant. She conceived aged 11 when she lost her virginity to a boy of 15 on a drunken night out with friends . . .

. . . Her 34-year-old mother, who gave birth to her youngest child eight months ago, said she ...

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NYT on in-store health clinics. Since they will be on the front-line with limited resources (i.e. no lab, no x-ray, staffed by mid-level practitioners), I would like to see how they do after a few well-publicized malpractice cases.

In the UK, almost 1 in 7 psychiatric inpatients use illegal drugs.

Some feedback on the recent NEJM study which showed that 40 percent of malpractice lawsuits were baseless, and 54 percent of compensation went to the lawyers.

The lead study author (who is a lawyer) concluded "[that the] malpractice system that is stricken with frivolous litigation are overblown". To be honest, a 40 percent baseless lawsuit rate was much higher than I expected. If anything, the study ...

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They're willing to wait six years as it pays for a medical student's education:

The town of Boissevain is about to sign a contract with a student from Brandon heading off to medical school in Hungary.

The community will pay for Rikki Yahiro's six years of education, if he works in the community for an equivalent amount of time once he's completed his program.

They bungled their kidney transplant program, and now here come the lawsuits.

Here's an eye-opener for all you smokers with kids:

Scientists have detected cancer-causing chemicals associated with tobacco smoke in the urine of infants whose parents smoke . . .

. . . They also hypothesize that it might not be enough simply to stop smoking in the presence of babies, since NNAL and nicotine could potentially cling to dust and the surfaces of household objects.

They're going to restate earnings. More from Health Care Renewal:

We have discussed how early advocates of managed care called for "breaking up the [physicians] guild" and handing the power to run health care over to managers and bureaucrats, like those who run UnitedHealth. Now people in the investment world may be starting to understand what managers and bureaucrats have done with this power. We physicians on the ...

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This time, it's a drug for dogs that's in trouble:

When reports of illness and death linked to the drug surfaced not long after it went on the market, the company was slow to report the problems to the Food and Drug Administration. The agency eventually did issue a reprimand and a formal warning letter, but two years later the drug is still being sold, and some consumers complain that too ...

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Should've at least done a set of cardiac enzymes. In the US, he would have been admitted for sure:

Mr Wade left hospital at 5.05pm but because of traffic and a detour to drop off another patient, it was 5.50pm by the time he got home. Miss Wade said by then he was quite breathless. He had some food but his condition deteriorated and an ambulance was called. ...

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A doctor tries to smuggle ecstasy by taping the drugs to his scrotum.

It seems to be a weekly occurrence. There should be a study done about this.

Another obese patient has his feelings hurt:

When the surgeon came in, he asked if I knew why my back was hurting. I told him that for 30 years, I'd had a job lifting heavy things and it had taken its toll. The doctor looked at me and said, "I think you have always eaten too much."

I told him most of my family was built large. He said, ...

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