An ER physician offers patients in a crowded ER $10 if they went home.

Results released from the recent BMJ survey. I put forth antibiotics and vaccines. The winner: sanitation.

A case of retinoblastoma found in a one-year old's birthday picture:

When Jasmin Nethercoat had her photograph taken on her first birthday, little did her parents realise the picture would save her sight.

Her mother Vicki had the photograph developed - only to notice a strange spot reflected in her daughter's left eye.

After seeing an optician, a GP and a specialist, the family was sent to ...

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"The MRI cookie jar"

Chicago-area doctors and MRI centers got caught bilking the system. (via Dr. Wes)

Health Care Renewal:
"Sorry, but to me, this one smells bad from the get go.

The kicker here is the populations of patients for whom ICDs might be indicated. The notion that there are patients who ought to have ICDs implanted, but are walking around, without any symptoms, in blissful ignorance of this fact does not make a lot of sense to me."

The Blog That ...

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Robert Centor suggests, by time:

I believe that lawyers have the right system. You pay for time. I have written often that physicians only have time to sell.

Clinical Cases points out a video where arm wrestling leads to an arm fracture:



The BMJ with the medicine behind the break:

This type of arm wrestling injury tends to occur when one arm wrestler tries to force the match in an effort to win or to change the tide of the contest. As the offensive wrestler ...

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The UK is considering chemical castration and microchip implantation:

Strategists think the injections - effectively the "chemical castration" of sexual predators to suppress their urges - would help prevent attacks . . .

. . . Other ideas include installing microchips in the mentally ill to monitor their behaviour and sending text messages to parents to warn them a paedophile is at large in their area.

There are 24 Viagra-related items in this picture. See if you can find them all:



Here's the answer. (via magicbluepill.com)

Maria wonders who the target audience is:

Seems like the users of public telephones. Because, obviously, we all know that people who could benefit from antipsychotics generally hang around public telephones.

Even if we go with the proposition that "the crazy people" tend to congregate around telephone booths (and take the time to read the advertisements on them the way self-righteous psychiatry residents do), why not advertise something that ...

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Straight talk from an ER nurse who sees excessive defensive medicine practiced in the emergency room daily:

Hey, I can understand the liability concept - we live in a "I'm going to sue you society". A lot of medicine in the United States is driven by fear of liability.

Some Catholic patients are carrying cards asking food and nutrition to continue even if they are brain dead:

The Observer in the UK reported Sunday that Catholics in the UK have taken to carrying special ID cards informing doctors that they do not wish to be deprived of food and fluids in the case of admission to hospital.

In a growing worldwide trend, doctors in the UK consider what ...

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Another view on the impact malpractice trials have on physicians - even when they are not found negligent:

Later that day, when I was alone with my thoughts, I had more time to contemplate the effect of this lawsuit on the doctor. A trial may or may not require the presence of the physician in the courtroom, but absence from the trial may lead the jury to feel that ...

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Someone gets it - we need to ban DTC ads.

A cerebral palsy patient was not getting his pain medication:

A Madison County Jail policy that forbids anyone from bringing prescription medicine to inmates, even if the drugs are delivered by a doctor, prompted a doctor to post $1,000 to bail out a patient who suffers from cerebral palsy and was apparently denied painkillers by jail staff.

Apparently the contestant drank about 2 gallons of water, and was found dead 5 hours later.

Update:
Orac with the best analysis of the case thus far. Here's part 1.

More David Williams from his Cavalcade of Risk post (see prior discussion):

Physicians commenting on my post admit directing patients to the ER in order to reduce their own risk of being sued. It's rational for patients to second-guess their docs in such circumstances. Would you hire a lawyer or accountant who always provided the most conservative advice with the most expensive consequences?
No, it's not unreasonable to ...

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Chris Rangel with a few ideas:

Part of the reason is that there are few if any protections against liability in treating a population that tends to be less healthy, have more bad habits (obesity, smoking, alcohol, drug abuse), and be less complaint with treatment and follow up. Ergo, they are at higher risk of bad outcomes and bad outcomes tend to lead to lawsuits regardless of any actual malpractice. ...

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A report that his surgery for diverticulitis went wrong. (via a reader tip)

Winners live on average two years longer than nominees.

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