Surely a disturbing finding.

He's running an interesting series of posts on the topic:

When it comes to cancer treatment, we are indeed Neanderthal, compared to the ideal, and to how it'll surely be in a few decades. It's because of two most major failings: first, we have no way of knowing, for a given individual, how much is enough to cure a cancer (and the converse: we can't tell which tumors aren't ...

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NEJM on primary care

A must-read article on the challenges facing primary care today:

No serious proposals to narrow the income gap between primary care physicians and specialists are on the national agenda. Fee-for-service payment rewards quantity rather than quality, fostering the rushed visits that underlie primary care's shortcomings. Pay-for-performance programs appear to be insufficient to make a substantial difference; physicians could increase their income more -— with less additional work -— by ...

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Most of the major non-profit Boston hospital CEOs are making in excess of $1 million.

The jury sends a clear message to a PCP in this case of hematuria which turned out to be bladder cancer:

"They realized, in a man over 50 years old who has blood in his urine, it is bladder cancer the majority of the time," said Gregory Patton, Doniger's Santa Ana attorney. "The doctor decided that he knew more than urologists do, and he was going to treat it like ...

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Many college students in China are going under the knife during the summer:

Like a growing number of students in China, Pan Ou will spend her university vacation going under the knife in a plastic surgery procedure she hopes will boost her chances of getting a good job after graduation . . .

. . . The EverCare in Beijing is one of thousands of plastic surgery clinics ...

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Another medical top 10 list - this time, the most likely misdiagnosed diseases.

According to a recent survey in Florida:

Of the students who considered ob/gyn but decided against it, 32 percent ranked "fear of malpractice" as the first or second deterrent to entering the field, compared to 21 percent who never considered ob/gyn. Nearly 27 percent of students who considered ob/gyn ranked "fear of being sued" as a first or second deterrent compared to 7 percent who never considered the specialty.


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He spends a morning a week in clinic:

At the clinic, which is affiliated with the country'Â’s best-known private hospital, Dr. Vazquez wears a white smock with his name embroidered on a pocket. His colleagues, men and women alike, greet him with a kiss on the cheek, as is the custom here, and address him as "Doctor" rather than "Mr. President."

Cutler with a policy piece in the NEJM. Matthew Holt dissents.

More religion-based OB/GYN practices are popping up:

The center is one of a small but growing number of practices around the country that tailor the care they provide to the religious beliefs of their doctors, shunning birth-control and morning-after pills, IUDs and other contraceptive devices, sterilizations, and abortions, as well as in vitro fertilization. Instead, doctors offer "natural family planning" -- teaching couples to monitor a woman's temperature and other ...

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Flea must be quite the intimidator to make an ER doc cry.

I'm going to side with the ER doc on this. Over the phone, you can't make an accurate assessment of the patient and thus, it's tough to call the shots on what tests should and shouldn't be ordered. If something happens to the patient, it's the ER physician's responsibility (and liability exposure), not the ...

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Can this ever fly here?

The British Fertility Society is recommending women with a body mass index of 36 and over should not be allowed access to fertility treatment.

Underweight women and those classed just as obese (BMI over 29) should be forced to address their weight before starting treatment, the society said.

Many offices are starting to charge for administrative requests in this time of declining reimbursement. Hey, that's what you get in a fee-for-service system:

Doctors - particularly primary care doctors - are increasingly billing for services that patients have long expected to get gratis: prescription refills, photocopies of medical records, phone consultations, family medical leave forms, medical disability forms, waivers of insurance premiums, waivers for handicapped plates.

Automotive ...

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The physician/author, Robin Cook, explores this idea in the NY Times:

As it is now, insurance companies "” following Medicare's lead "” pay primary care doctors according to the number of patients they see. Each patient visit is generally reimbursed at a flat rate of slightly more than $50. The payment is the same whether the patient is a healthy, young person with a runny nose or an elderly ...

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Fox News explores this question during this interview regarding a physician accused of treating Al Qaeda members.

Reasserting that there are no certainties in medicine:

Montgomery tells us it is important to realize medicine is not a science. We imagine if it's a science, its conclusions and recommendations are certain. They're not, as any honest doctor would tell you.

And curing ourselves of this false quest for an impossible certainty is step one toward having a medicine we can live with and manage.

According to the informed opinions of physicians interviewed in Boston.

Many physicians fudge their CME requirements. However, they're not running for president:

Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist did not meet all the requirements needed to keep his medical license active - even though he gave paperwork to Tennessee officials indicating that he had, his office acknowledged Tuesday.

Tennessee requires its licensed physicians to complete 40 hours of continuing medical education every two years. Frist, a heart-lung surgeon ...

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Addicted to technology

An academic thinks the proliferation of portable devices will lead to lawsuits:

Keeping employees on electronic leashes such as laptops, BlackBerries and other devices that allow them to be constantly connected to the office could soon lead to lawsuits by those who grow addicted to the technology, a U.S. academic warns.
(via digg)

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