And how they are able to do it.

Hypertension in the ER

Are all elevated blood pressure readings an emergency?

Just another day in an OR in Iraq.

Dr. Wes argues they can't be totally prevented, no matter how hard we try:

Errors, as difficult and as unfortunate as they may be, remain critical to our development as doctors. Although no one wants them to occur, they do have benefits to developing a mature perspective and technique to medical practice. Critical review of inevitable medical errors should remain a critical part of our medical school curricula.


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Diabetes Mine continues to stir the pot, analyzing a recent speech by the ADA's Richard Kahn. Dr. RW gives his take.

Jenkem

A desperate ploy to get high, or a hoax?

Police in Naples, Fla., are on the lookout for users of "jenkem," a homemade drug created by allowing human urine and feces to ferment in a bottle with a balloon covering the opening. Users inhale the released methane gas from the balloon to get a "euphoric high similar to ingesting cocaine, but with strong hallucinations of times past," according to ...

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Home testing for obstructive sleep apnea was recently approved. Will this kill off the field of sleep medicine?

Nicaragua's strict abortion ban may have led to this woman's death:

Two weeks after Olga Reyes danced at her wedding, her bloated and disfigured body was laid to rest in an open coffin "” the victim, her husband and some experts say, of Nicaragua's new no-exceptions ban on abortion.

Reyes, a 22-year-old law student, suffered an ectopic pregnancy. The fetus develops outside the uterus, cannot survive and causes ...

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Whether or not to let residents operate on you. A physician responds:

I was talking to a physician today who needed back surgery a year ago. When he went to the hospital, he demanded that no resident take part in the case because in his words "I didn't want to wind up paralyzed." Probably an extreme statement, but you get the point. So for every physician who writes in ...

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Physician's don't care about making the EMR the centerpiece of the patient encounter:

"You have to realize that physicians have been trained four years in med school, then three to seven years in post-graduate training. The funny thing is that they want to take care of patients. They don't want to become specialists in creating medical records. They look at the medical record as an incidental cost of doing business. ...

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Some tough talk on DTC ads and Big Pharma propaganda:

I would put journal articles funded by Big Pharma in the same category as news articles written by white supremacist groups.

A long and winding road. For those who don't appreciate what physicians go through.

Wow.



(via Dr. Wes)

Saying "no" to a patient in the emergency room can provoke a spectrum of responses, including some bizarre ones:

She escalated; I explained my thought process. She yelled, she wept, and she begged. I held firm, and she was discharged. On her way out she stopped by the charting station and said, with a vicious spite in her voice, "I hate you. You are ...

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Instant WBC?

They're thinking of having WBC as a point-of-care test. Is this really needed?

Also, more useless WBC's being ordered means a higher percentage of falsely abnormal test results. This inevitably leads to more clinical testing, more diagnostic dead-ends, more needless patient anxiety, and more wasted healthcare dollars.

Amy Tenderich comments on a recent speech by the ADA's Chief Scientific Officer.

Physicians at the AHA conference are firing back at Nissen's controversial Avandia meta-analysis:

The validity of Dr. Nissen's findings was challenged by Silvio E. Inzucchi, M.D., clinical director of the Section of Endocrinology at Yale. "Any minor manipulations to this information can be done to show either how much harm rosiglitazone is doing, or how much good it has done," Dr. Inzucchi claimed.

He said that in the Nissen ...

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There is no cure for Type I diabetes, so it seems she was either mistaken or misdiagnosed:

. . . doctors interviewed agreed that if Berry was truly a Type 1 diabetic, it would be suicide to simply stop taking insulin. They surmised that the 41-year-old actress was either mistaken, misinformed or misdiagnosed, and probably always had Type 2, which tends to affect people later in life and can ...

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More Blogger problems

Apologies for the disappearing and reappearing posts over the last few days. Blogger has been having problems publishing to an FTP site. Hopefully they are now fixed.

There are some posts were the comments don't show up. I fixed most of them, but if there are any I missed, please let me know.

"Suicide tourism"

NYC is a good place to die for many people.

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