And that's pretty much it:

Although government-dominated systems may not improve care, they will relieve anxiety about access, ease financial pressure, and assuage societal guilt. When something is "free, " it diminishes the angst (and increases the demand). The trouble with government is that it's too far removed from the clinical marketplace to make intelligent even relevant decisions, doesn't realize the consequences of its actions, e.g. paying primary care ...

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Joe Paduda writes EMTALA and cost-shifting:

Opinion time. EMTALA is a hidden tax, requiring hospitals to treat patients without hope of reimbursement. The cost of treatment is then shifted to other, paying patients, further driving up their health care costs.

And as more and more folks lose their insurance, those left with insurance cards in their wallets will find the increasing number of their 'dependents' is growing beyond their ...

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Edwin Leap on why physicians care about suicidal patients:

As for me, I'll keep pushing the charcoal and talking to the counselors and sewing the wounds. And God help me, I'll try not to act angry or annoyed. Because if my child ever reaches that place, and I can't be there to fight for them, I want someone to ask, not'Why do we do it?', but rather,'Why ...

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Electrophysiologist Dr. Wes on the NY Times' articles on afib and its treatments:

To think that doctors are not keenly aware of the risks involved with this procedure is ludicrous - we spend far too many (unreimbursed) hours in the lab to think otherwise. Believe me, none of us are proud of the 25-30% recurrence rate seen with this procedure, none of us enjoys the long procedure lengths nor ...

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The NY Times summarizes what's lacking with Michael Moore's single-payer solution.

An audacious take on health care reform. Fox News interviews National Review's Jerry Bowyer: "I think the terrorists have shown over and over again"¦they're very good at gaming the system with bureaucracies."

It is more than the insurance industry that reformers will have to overcome:

So, to do as Moore wants in the United States, you would need to do more than just overcome the insurance industry. You would need to cut the salaries of doctors, reform the legal system, enrage our allies by causing their prescription drug costs to escalate, and accustom patients to a central decision-maker authorized to determine what ...

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The well-known symptoms of diarrhea is forcing users to stick to a low-fat diet:

The gross side effects might scare away the less-committed, but some experts appreciate Alli's very real, very immediate consequences of cheating on your diet.

"It forces you to eat a lower-fat diet "” if you don't, you're violently penalized for not doing so," says David Sarwer, the director of clinical services at the Center ...

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Classic headline from an op-ed wondering about whether last week's events will impact screening foreign physicians:

Terrorist doctors might now just be the in thing for jihadis. Canada, like Britain has a doctor shortage where the solution is to bring in foreign doctors. Andy Knight, a University of Alberta specialist in industrial relations said that our screening of foreign doctors is not sufficient. But the reality is that no ...

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. . . or pain in the ass? There is a fine line.

Health courts

Pros and cons.

Bilal Abdulla

Portrait of the physician-terrorist.

A nurse feels that the EMTALA allows ER's to turn away non-emergent cases. Why don't they do it more often then?

What is interesting is that the act also states: "If the patient does not have an "emergency medical condition", the statute imposes no further obligation on the hospital".
So the question becomes why do we treat all of these people, 90% of whom do not have an "emergent ...

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A patient asks a chiropractor about her abdominal pain during her treatment. His answer gets him in trouble.

Breast self-exams

There is no data to support it reduces mortality from breast cancer.

This should be mandatory in medical school. This eye-opening experience really demonstrates the lamb-like, idealistic naivety of American medical students today.

Many drug reps think so:

Physicians know that all the big pharma companies have their hands tied and that speakers can't talk off-label anymore or use their own slides. Why would they want to come out and hear exactly what we're telling them at every call and lunch & learn: essentially the company line, which is what the slide decks are. Unless they really want a free dinner, it's not ...

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Dr. Crippen tries to make sense of it:

. . . let us hope that there is not going to be yet another wave of racism in the NHS.

I fear, however, that the gutter press and the sleazy media will indeed fuel the flames of racism. I fear there will be a backlash against doctors from the middle-east and Asia, and most of our Moslem doctors. Not all ...

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Is there a connection?

Almost overnight, health care has become a security issue.

The news from London and Glasgow brings a striking reminder that Al Qaeda is willing to exploit any national weakness.

In the case of the British, it's an ongoing physician shortage brought on by the inherit shortcomings of their government-run health care system. The shortage allowed Al Qaeda operatives to legally enter the country ...

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That's the current trend:

Since 1996-97, a 40 percent increase in the female primary care physician supply has helped to offset a 16 percent decline in the male primary care physician supply relative to the U.S. population. At the same time, primary care physicians' incomes have lost ground to both inflation and medical and surgical specialists' incomes. And women in primary care face a 22 percent income gap relative ...

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