It was successfully removed: "Huang's facial tumour became noticeable when he was 4 years old, the hospital said. It grew bigger ever more rapidly as he grew older, blocking his left eye, pushing his left ear to shoulder level, knocking out his teeth and deforming his backbone."

Richard Schoor, aka The Independent Urologist, explains why.

You use more of it, naturally.

Chris Rangel says there will always be two tiers, no matter how much the left denies it:

Patients pay more out of pocket for the convenience of shorter wait times, less paperwork, less bureaucratic limitations, and more personalized care. Whether these new models lead to better care or not remain to be proven but they definitely lead to better service and Americans are increasingly more willing to pay for this.

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Wonder no more about what plastic surgery product-makers give out to physicians.



(via plasticized.com)

Sometimes, physicians' words have lasting impact on patients.

It's already been done, with the Bristol-Myers Squibb Children's Hospital in New Jersey. With the increased scrutiny of pharma's relationship with physicians, could this happen today? Roy Poses comments further:

The decision to name the hospital also took place in 2001, before the pervasive nature of conflicts of interest in health care started receiving some attention. I wonder how many other glaring examples of such conflicts ...

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Debunking some Sicko myths. (via Catron)

Physician reporting

"Garbage in, garbage out," says Dr. Wes.

A vicious op-ed in the Washington Post slams the AMA. No doubt, many physicians may feel the same way:

You might expect that the AMA would fight the insurers, hospitals, government bureaucrats and ivory tower academics who have diminished physicians' incomes, besmirched their ethical reputations and compromised their professionalism -- but you would be wrong. No, instead, at its annual meeting last month, the AMA declared war on retail ...

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The topic of whether a non-teaching service adversely affects medication education was brought up recently. Robert Centor with his thoughts on the mattter:

Dr. Wes is correct that some hospitals would rather have private hospitalists care for patients. Program directors and chairs of medicine must fight that trend . . .

. . . I know that it can be done right, because I see it being ...

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A NEJM study says that close friends may be associated with one's obesity:

The answer, the researchers report, was that people were most likely to become obese when a friend became obese. That increased a person's chances of becoming obese by 57 percent. There was no effect when a neighbor gained or lost weight, however, and family members had less influence than friends.

A geneticist fails to diagnose Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. The jury awards a $23.5 million verdict, but the couple now needs to lobby the government:

A jury determined Monday that the University of South Florida was 90 percent at fault for the "wrongful birth" of their child, Caleb, who has a genetic disorder and will require constant care for the rest of his life. The school, therefore, should pay the bulk ...

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Fascinating interview of a surgeon and the issues she faces.

What was practicing general surgery like?

Horrible!! Absolutely horrible. The ER would call with "this old lady has non-specific belly pain...I'd like you to come lay hands on her?" As if my hands are magical. As if I can really tell what the hell's going on. The ER doc is just trying to cover his ass ...

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Go to Cuba!

Dr. RW points to some links on the verdict clearing Weis' physicians of malpractice.

Plaintiff attorney Eric Turkewitz comments:

Nationwide, approximately 2/3 of all malpractice verdicts favor the defendants. This occurs because, generally speaking, it is usually the most difficult of cases that go to verdict, and due to juries favoring physicians over patients according to a recent Michigan Law Review study.
That doesn't take into account ...

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More ER stories. A patient demands Zithromax for post-traumatic stress. Shadowfax comments on this post: ". . . if they're 4+ crazy, then a Z-pack is a small price to pay for a smooth discharge."

A common occurrence, and harder to detect:

Make no mistake: we certainly see drug seekers in the office. Many of them are charming and have extremely legitimate-sounding stories. Over the years, though, I've discovered something in my own thought processes that flags them unerringly: in the course of the history and exam, in which the long-suffering patient is telling a tale of such woe, such suffering, such angst, the ...

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The Angry Pharmacist has his thoughts, and doesn't hold back:

Now I'm not siding with Purdue one bit, but I think the doctors themselves are partially to blame. Purdue got dinged because they were "claiming to doctors that OxyContin was less addictive and less subject to abuse than other pain medications."

One question. If that was the case, why is it a C2 and not a C3 or ...

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Taking exception to faulty computerized physician rating systems:

After 26 years of a successful medical practice, Alan Berkenwald took for granted that he had a good reputation. But last month he was told he didn't measure up -- by a new computerized rating system.

A patient said an insurance company had added $10 to the cost of seeing Berkenwald instead of other physicians in his western Massachusetts town ...

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