These two ERs want to put an end to it:

After evaluating patients who come to the emergency room, nurse practitioners or physician's assistants will inform those with nonurgent symptoms that they can seek treatment at a specific community health clinic.

Patients who insist on staying will have to pay a $150 deposit before being treated in the emergency room or an $80 deposit to be seen in urgent ...

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Lack of primary care and outpatient services. It's only to get worse given the crisis primary care is in:

Instead, the people clogging the ER are the insured who can't reach their regular doctor. Cunningham found that communities with fewer or busier doctors tended to have higher rates of ER use. It makes sense -- ERs are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Unlike at a ...

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In cases that go wrong, they are highly sought to be expert witnesses against the referral source.

The patient wanted to "think about it", but the 10-week delay results in a lawsuit:

One of Dr. F's patients was a 44-year-old woman who was given a routine mammogram as part of her annual checkup. The results pointed to a "suspicious area in the upper outer quadrant of the left breast." On receiving the report, Dr. F, a family physician, called the patient into the office to discuss ...

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As this writer opines:

If you have moral or ethical objections to the particular drug called for by the physician, keep them to yourself. Your views on birth control pills and abortion, don't change the fact that it is dangerous and downright deadly for some women to get pregnant. A few states passed laws giving pharmacists a loophole on that, but if you can't do your job, isn't it just ...

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People are going after the hospitals:

The deaths at Uptown's Memorial Medical Center during the stifling, dark hours after Hurricane Katrina have spawned more than the highly publicized arrests of a doctor and two nurses on murder charges. A predictable thicket of civil lawsuits has also sprouted, records show.

Two suits filed at Orleans Parish Civil District Court concern the deaths of five patients at Memorial, some of ...

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He opts out of his contract and goes back to the primary care grind:

He knew he would have to part with most of his patients. But it proved much harder than he expected. "When you see the patients and talk with them, and you understand their financial situation and how difficult it was for them to afford [the concierge service]. . . . I had this 90-year-old lady ...

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Without profit potential, it was abandoned by Big Pharma. However, this treatment for black fever will have immeasurable positive impact:

A small charity based in San Francisco has conducted the medical trials needed to prove that the drug is safe and effective. Now it is on the verge of getting final approval from the Indian government. A course of treatment with the drug is expected to cost ...

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It's scaring the hell out of the medical-device industry:

'Industry and surgeons have to face up to reality: We have been overpaying for procedures - in particular, cardiac procedures,' Durenberger said. 'We have to do something to change it.'

Some would call it a "national crisis".

A psychiatrist is convicted of forging prescriptions. How his methadone clinic will soon be under fire:

On July 21, addiction specialist Marc Shinderman was found guilty of 58 crimes connected with his practice of forging another doctor's name and federal registration number on prescriptions for patients of his Westbrook methadone clinic. He now faces a prison sentence, and his clinic, CAP Quality Care Inc., is the subject of ...

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Medicare Part D is now hitting many seniors hard:

Although the Medicare handbook clearly describes the coverage break, critics say most Medicare recipients, bombarded with advertising from private prescription plans, focused on deductibles and premiums and the drugs included.

"There was a lot of emphasis on signing up seniors. It was a crusade almost," said Stuart Guterman, a Medicare expert with the nonpartisan Commonwealth Fund. He doubts that ...

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There are some courses that address this topic for foreign physicians:

Although foreign-born physicians may have excellent medical training and comprehension of English, patients and co-workers can struggle to understand their speech and are often reluctant to call attention to the problem. For example, the numbers 15 and 50 can sound similar in some accents, as can the words "breathing" and "bleeding." This increases the potential for medical errors, Wilner ...

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Another success story:

Before tort reform, Mississippi was viewed by outsiders as a state with a "jackpot justice" system that featured frivolous lawsuits and outlandish damage awards.

The legislation has removed a huge obstacle for many companies who were leery of moving to Mississippi. Even some insurance companies who fled the state have returned, including Mass Mutual and St. Paul Travelers.

Trial lawyers and tort reform opponents say ...

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Often charlatans (and lawyers) prey on the fact that medicine is inherently uncertain:

Over the next few weeks, Trevor did indeed begin to gain consciousness, an improvement that Debbie took as proof of Dreamhealer's powers. "The doctors said that he wouldn't recover, so to me, that's a miracle," Debbie said. "It's a miracle that he's still alive." Yet of course medicine is not an exact science; doctors can only go ...

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An official admits they "dropped the ball". Really:

Dr. Chris Eagle says health officials "lost the human touch" in dealing with Rose Lundy, 34, who was three months pregnant.

Her husband, Rick Lundy, had pleaded with emergency room staff at Peter Lougheed Hospital to help his wife find privacy.

But he was told there were no beds and she was left to go through the experience in ...

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They do it because it works:

The $258 Merck lunch, for example, cost the company only $10.75 a person and fell clearly within industry guidelines allowing modest meals. But it could easily return thousands of dollars for the drug maker in prescriptions for the osteoporosis medication Fosamax and the asthma treatment Singulair, the two drugs discussed during lunch with two Merck representatives.

An unlikely combo to be sure, but he serves up some malpractice views from the other side:

As to the counter, from reading in the medical blogosphere, I think that many physicians simply don't like adversarial settings. That's true of most of us, even most lawyers, but I think physicians in particular are acutely sensitive to it. Maybe it's the fact that they (like preachers) aren't ...

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The last two weeks focuses on colon cleansing and liver flushes.

No surprise, as has been discussed here previously. (via PointofLaw.com)