Some states are requiring physicians to report poor drivers, or treating illegal immigrants:

While there is overwhelming support for reporting child abuse, physicians are less comfortable turning in patients who might lose their driver's licenses due to medical conditions, and they oppose efforts to document immigrants who come for treatment.

Some physicians fear the demands on them to diagnose and report society's problems will only continue to increase.

This growing trend is troubling some bioethicists:

Some doctors and bioethicists, however, say the practice raises the disturbing specter of transplant surgeons preying on dying patients for their organs, possibly pressuring doctors and families to discontinue treatment, adversely affecting donors' care in their final days and even hastening their deaths.
(via White Coat Notes)

An unexpected JHACO check catches Massachusetts General Hospital with its pants down:

Inspectors found numerous quality of care problems at Massachusetts General Hospital during a surprise inspection late last year, noting concerns about medication safety, inconsistent handwashing by caregivers, and incomplete medical records.

A little-known fact when patients testify before the FDA:

Brown's message about the need to reduce disproportionately high mortality rates among African-American women, like herself, resonated whether she was testifying before the FDA, addressing the nation's mayors, or speaking with members of Congress, where she was a staff assistant to former US House Majority Leader Jim Wright.

What few in Brown's audiences knew is that the patient advocate ...

Read more...

Cracking down on lavish outings and dinners for doctors are hurting the luxury hospitality business:

Simon Heartfield, specialist key account manager at De Vere Hotels & Leisure, said: "The code has not done us any good. Some pharmaceutical companies have overdone it." He said drugs companies were among the most important corporate clients for the hotel and leisure sector, and "a lot have taken [the new code] to heart".
...

Read more...

#1 Dinosaur feels that the hepatitis B and HSV vaccine should be optional, and the meningitis vaccine be expanded to cover infants.

Shrink Rap fears P4P measures will rob physicians of their thinking ability:

I remain skeptical that this is the wrong approach. Insurance company bureaucrats will have us "teaching to the test" in the same way that primary education has gone... and with the same disastrous outcomes, I fear. Kids can answer the questions, but can they think? Do we want doctors who just focus on keeping hemoglobin A1C's down, ...

Read more...

Dr. Charles with his take:

But then I pictured these poor kids dreading their trips to the hospital. While his friends are out playing soccer, John with leukemia has to go see the bearded man who will be administering toxins which simultaneously save and disfigure him. While her friends are crowded around a Nintendo Wii, Emma has to drive with her mom to see the smiling folks that will be ...

Read more...

If something goes wrong, who gets sued? The OB/GYN of course - the one with "deep pockets".

$75,000. And that's before malpractice insurance premiums of $15,000.

How radiologists describe finding breast cancer in mammograms. Malpractice fears are killing this field. Patients lose again:

In short, radiologists are afraid of being sued, and there's evidence that they have more reason to worry than providers in other areas of medicine.

Missed breast cancer is the most common basis for medical malpractice lawsuits in the United States, according to the Physician Insurers Association of America, a ...

Read more...

Unpasteurized milk.

Good for her - finally, patients are starting to speak out against drug advertising:

No, I am not a doctor, and neither are most people, and I believe it is unconscionable for drug manufactures to advertise; to push their products to non-medically-trained persons. This policy "“ this gimmick "“ sets patients up to undermine treatment plans that their doctors have chosen after careful study and thorough knowledge of the patient. ...

Read more...

Richard Reece comments. Big players are starting to come into this emerging field.

Early research suggests that it may shrink tumors in rats. Now, patients are willing to go to significant lengths to find the compound:

Now, hundreds of people are trying desperately to buy the water-soluble powder from chemical suppliers, giving each other advice over the Internet on how to mix the ingredients, discussing how strong doses should be or how to convince their doctors to come on board.
Update:

Read more...

How Doctors Think



An intriguing new book from Jerome Groopman, a hematologist and staff writer for the New Yorker. TIME.com on the book:

Groopman began to intensively examine how doctors think and how they get sidetracked from the truth. He learned that about 80% of medical mistakes are the result of predictable mental traps, or cognitive errors, that bedevil all ...

Read more...

Continuing attacks on its narcotic crusade seems to have hurt the DEA's feelings:

The men and women of DEA take offense at Dr. Gottlieb's assertion that the DEA has no capacity to understand the need for effective pain treatment. We are parents of young children, children of aging parents, and sometimes patients ourselves who appreciate the need for effective, accessible pain relief to prevent needless suffering.

It's about time. I enjoy their health reporting - only natural that a blog would follow.

"You made $11 million last year, you just fired 10,000 employees, and you got a 36% raise this year."

Drug ad bingo

PharmedOut with more. (via PharmaGossip)

Most Popular