An interesting hypothesis:

In Marmor's simulated versions of how the painters would most likely have seen their work, Degas' later paintings of nude bathers become so blurry it's difficult to see any of the artist's brushstrokes. Monet's later paintings of the lily pond and the Japanese bridge at Giverny, when adjusted to reflect the typical symptoms of cataracts, appear dark and muddied. The artist's signature vibrant colors are muted, replaced ...

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The public demand for physician perfection comes with a price:

This zero defect mentality costs money and very little of it improves patient care. Mostly it goes to cover the massive cost of defensive medicine which is what, I would dare say from personal experience, most of American medicine comes down to. We know better of course, but it is a lot easier to obtain the CT or ...

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Jury decision making

David Bernstein takes a revealing look:

Jurors, like sporting event spectators, look to pick, and then root, for a side. When jurors have no allegiance to either side, many rely on the story behind the parties to motivate them to commit to a "team." . . .

. . . Don't count on relying on the law or the facts, unless you are able to conjure up a ...

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It's a rumble at a Pfizer-sponsored dinner:

She said Dr Khalid Mahmood, 61, behaved "impeccably" at the July 2003 event, hosted by drug company Pfizer at London restaurant Claridges.

She claimed it was rep Margaret Ajoku who assaulted him when he refused to fill in a questionnaire, the General Medical Council in Manchester heard.

The GP denies his fitness to practise is impaired through misconduct.
(via
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Schwitzer tracks more unbalanced, pro-screening media bias against evidence-based medical practice. Culprits include The Wall Street Journal, CNN and Georgia Public Radio.

There's outrage in the medical blogosphere.

TBTAM
:
"You may argue all you want as to whether or not you personally believe in abortion, but at this point in time, abortion is legal. The courts have no right to decide what technique a physician uses to perform that legal act. That decision is made by the physician and the woman, with her health and best interests in mind.


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Asian-Americans, and Koreans in particular, are bracing for possible backlash in the wake of the massacre:

"In the wake of 9/11, we saw so many racially charged incidents that I don't think it's out of the question to suspect this [prejudice] will happen," says Aimee Baldillo, a spokeswoman for the Asian American Justice Center, a Washington-based civil-rights group. "The lesson we learned then was that individuals are going to get ...

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Making the Rounds

For those interested in the Boston healthcare scene, The Boston Herald starts a health blog, entitled Making the Rounds.

Nancy Turnbull, President of their Foundation, and on faculty at the Harvard School of Public Health, haikus her thoughts on blogs:

Months more of reform.
So little time each day.
Please, no new health blogs
My response: Better get used to it Nancy.

GE has the fetal ultrasound market cornered in India, where law prohibits doctors from telling expecting parents the gender of their baby. Are they taking advantage of the cultural preference for boys?

GE says it has put its own safeguards in place, with salespeople stressing that the machines aren't to be used to determine gender. But prosecutors in Hyderabad have recently filed criminal charges against GE and a ...

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Chronic Lyme disease

Is this really a disease? The IDSA says no. Critics call treatment for chronic Lyme disease voodoo medicine. It's all under the microscope in Connecticut.

Patients are voting with their feet when it comes to government price negotiations. Another reason that the VA shouldn't be looked at as the holy grail of health care:

Statistics released March 22 by the VHA and Department of Health and Human Services show that 1.16 million seniors who are already enrolled in the VHA drug program have nonetheless signed up for Medicare Part D. That's about one-third of ...

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A new approach to the uninsured - coverage up to $25,000 annually, without catastrophic health insurance. Liberal policy wonks may scoff, but this may be what people want:

In an interview, Gov. Bredesen says he listened to focus groups and queried blue-collar folks, such as a waitress at a waffle restaurant, to devise his plan. "They weren't interested in buying insurance for catastrophic events. They wanted access to ...

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Doctor Anonymous on the psychological autopsy by mainstream media:

I could be wrong, but I'm starting to see people in the press making the association between depression and murder. Of course, this kid had mental illness and of course he was undergoing treatment for it. But, the implication that everyone with mental illness has the potential "to snap" and kill people - as being suggested in the media - ...

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Dr. Wes points out how different they are.

She wrote that health savings accounts costs more for women due to more preventive exam needs. However, she is a single-payer fanatic, with obvious bias to her study - which is not even available for public viewing. (via Health Care BS)

Hospitalist Chris Rangel looks at both sides, as well as a take-home message unrelated to whether guns are regulated or not:

Unfortunately, the best lesson to come out of this is for law enforcement and first responders. Don't automatically assume that multiple homicides in normally peaceful communities where the killer(s) is still a large are isolated incidents in which a rational murderer is attempting to flee and has no interest ...

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A study finds that not all infants with Apparent Life-Threatening Events (ALTE's) need to be admitted. However, Flea finds that practicing evidence-based medicine has its consequences:

Somehow the message got transmitted to mom that Flea didn't want the child to be admitted at all (this was true, but we agreed to the admission nonetheless). The next morning at 5:30 mom told us she didn't want Flea to be the ...

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hospital impact lists the influential web 2.0 health sites.

Written by an OB/GYN, this is a novel where chapters are revealed weekly on this blog:

What would you do if your grandson needed a kidney transplant, but kept getting passed over when one was available? This is a novel in progress about an obstetrician who faced such a situation. I'll post at least one chapter per week.

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