Health 2.0

In most cases, Web 2.0 health sites are positive step forward. But as with all user-generated content, there is the chance of misinformation:

On the internet, as the old saying goes, nobody knows you are a dog"”or an idiot, notes Dan Keldsen of AIIM, a non-profit association based in Silver Spring, Maryland, which helps companies manage digital information. And too much health information can confuse people, says Monique ...

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A WSJ op-ed calls focusing on the uninsured "a waste of money":

Sadly, these ads will waste money that should be used to continue the Society's educational campaign about prevention and detection. The evidence shows that universal health coverage does not improve survival rates for cancer patients. Despite the large number of uninsured, cancer patients in the U.S. are most likely to be screened regularly, have the fastest access ...

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Hospitalists

Sid Schawb on how his opinion has changed on the matter, and touches on surgical hospitalists in particular:

Taking acute consults and doing emergency operations, the surgical hospitalist makes the life of the rest of the surgeons far more pleasant, allowing them to see their patients, carry out their scheduled surgery without interruption. ORs run more efficiently because of the more ready availability of someone to fit in the ...

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The vomit-drinking doctor

Read about this and other bizarre medical experiments.

Interested in an anatomically correct tattoo?

Stanley Feld explains why.

ERnursey wonders why narcotics are becoming first-line treatment for pain in some ERs:

And not just any old Norco, uh uh now we give a Norco 10mg all the time. For ankle sprain or lacerations. What about Motrin? It's my drug of choice.

When did we stop titrating Morphine? In our ER the standard used to be Morphine 2mg IV every 5 minutes up to ten milligrams. Now the ...

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More great insights about working for Kaiser. A pediatrician tells all:

When I started here I had big ideas. As I spent more time here, I realized that the doctors were starting to lose their fire. Their life-force so to speak. The job became 'just a job.' Everyone clocked out on time...and only did enough to not get fired. Typical employee mentality.

What is said is important.

A "free" ambulance ride

An patient calls 911 for an ambulance because the bus was too expensive:

So, basically, our uninsured patient will pay $1000 for an ambulance ride and $700 or $1000 for the ER bill to look at her 3-month-old problem because $2 for a bus was too expensive and, after all that, she didn't have the money to pay for the outpatient prescription anyway.

Airport, or ER?

Self-serve kiosks are being used to cut down on ER waiting times.

Mississippi is reaping the benefits:

"We had hospitals closing their delivery rooms," said Barbour. "We had only one neurosurgeon between Jackson and Memphis."

Then came tort reform in 2004 and now doctors are coming back. Barbour announced the fifth decrease in medical liability rates in three years. Overall, that's a 45 percent decrease.

But more importantly, lawsuits against doctors for medical malpractice are down. Home grown doctors ...

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They're possibly about to try in Washington.

Do not resuscitate

A tattoo may not be enough.

Stossel in the WSJ

He takes on Michael Moore head on with his WSJ op-ed:

Patients in countries with government-run health care can't get timely access to many basic medical treatments, never mind experimental treatments. That's why, if you suffer from cancer, you're better off in the U.S., which is home to the newest treatments and where patients have access to the best diagnostic equipment. People diagnosed with cancer in America have a ...

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Pimping medical students

A Medscape editorial against the age-old practice:

Unfortunately, medical students who are mistreated often go on to become doctors who mistreat other medical students, creating a cycle of abuse. This pattern has continued despite "righteous declarations by the academic community." To break this cycle now, individual physicians will have to acknowledge these unhealthy behaviors. They must get beyond any mistreatment they suffered and demonstrate the compassionate behavior that colleagues, students, ...

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Robert Centor suggests that the zeal to lower hemoglobin A1c's below 7 is partly responsible for the Avandia controversy:

His point, on which I concur, states that our efforts to lower HgbA1c stimulated our willingness to try another drug to reach the magic number. Perhaps the zeal for lowering HgbA1c to below 7 stimulates us to use a second or third drug. Perhaps if we had a more realistic ...

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Thanks for the mention. A number of great blogs on his list.

How not to do it.

Containing costs

The Independent Urologist with some good tips.

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