Sid Schwab with more eloquence from the OR:

Nothing, it seems to me, represents what the general surgeon does more than that. It makes me feel connected to and a part of the chain of daring and innovative people who braved the terrain and blazed the path for us all, a century and a half ago; done right, it can be beautiful. Yes, guts: beautiful. Done wrong, it can ...

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The plot of a Scalpel, a novel where a serial-killer surgeon hunts down lawyers:

Berman's main character "“ who, Berman insists, is not his alter ego -- is a mysterious surgeon who is tired of attorneys who relentlessly pursue medical malpractice lawsuits against doctors who have done nothing wrong. The attorneys stop at nothing to ruin the careers and lives of their victims.

One surgeon, whose ...

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keagirl tells us about her day. Spending an hour squeezing a penis (for priapism) and watching a woman urinate (to observe a "strange stream").

This idea makes more sense:

The pharmaceutical companies urge you to see your doctor to see if a certain drug is right for you. Scare tactics pure and simple. The drug companies also send salespeople to doctor's offices, urging doctors to prescribe their products. This is big business. Now, if a doctor prescribes a medication and it has a harmful effect, here come the lawyers urging you to sue the ...

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A business school professor's solution to health care costs. With this thinking, why is there the need for medical school? Simply take a 2-year program and you'll have all the privileges doctors have.

A professional nitpicker

A woman removes lice from hair for a living. Due to the painstaking process, she is in high demand.

A satirical look from The Independent Urologist:

Case report: A 41-year-old man was referred from another provider for the evaluation of 606.1. The patient underwent an out-of-network 99244 at our office. An 81000 and 87088, authorized to be performed in our office, were negative. Additional blood tests, 83001, 83002, 84146, and 84403 were sent to a participating laboratory facility and were in the normal range. Multiple 89310s revealed 606.0. ...

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A majority of physicians give patients what they request:

The survey questioned 335 doctors and 39,090 U.S. residents. It found that 78% of PCPs received patient requests for specific drugs they have seen advertised on television and that 67% reported they sometimes grant the requests.

Death from jail freedom

You're at a high risk of dying after being released from prison:

Newly released prison inmates are more than 12 times as likely to die from a drug overdose during their first two weeks of freedom as the general population, a study has found.

772 middle-aged people had the procedure in 1998. Over 15,000 in 2004.

Richard Reece looks into the crystal ball.

Especially relevant in light of their torcetrapib disaster. They're working on an OTC and spray version of Viagra. That's just what we need. (via PharmaGossip)

A controversial study suggesting just that:

"Our research shows that surgeons who have less experience with the off-pump technique are more likely to perform this technique on black patients, rather than on white patients," said Professor Dana Mukamel of the University of California, Irvine.

"Racial disparities in access to heath care are well known throughout the United States. Black and minority groups usually do not have as much ...

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I agree with the individual mandate, but taxing the providers and hospitals will simply deter physicians from practicing in California. As with any radical proposal, there are large obstacles ahead.

Update:
Here's the reality of what will happen once physicians' revenues are taxed:

"The idea that taxing physicians' revenue to cause them to provide more care of higher quality defies understanding," said John R. Graham, director of ...

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Impressive picture of a central line complication:

A 40-year-old man with Crohn's disease underwent an uncomplicated operation involving lysis of adhesions that were causing intestinal obstruction. After surgery, a cardiologist inserted a central venous catheter through the left subclavian vein. No problems with catheterization were noted. Three weeks later, after discharge, mild pain and edema developed in the patient's right lower leg. He was treated with antibiotics for ...

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This study indirectly suggests that it may.

. . . but also wants to do away with non-economic damages (for "ordinary negligence").

The reason: "Many people want their lotto ticket in case they get hurt."

I see about 13 patients in 4 hours. This guy was ambitious, but hey, that's what a fee-for-service reimbursement system does to you.

Some are calling "loser pays" a deterrent for bringing frivolous malpractice suits. Here's one case that may deter future cases.

Here's a woman who waited 24 hours for stomach pain. If she waited that long, it was likely not an emergency.

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