Not exactly the flatulence, but the subsequent match that was lit to dispel the odor. What is the differential for this? I would say various types of malabsorption syndromes, lactose intolerance, celiac disease, bacterial overgrowth or irritable bowel syndrome to name a few.

Nice WSJ article. The p value that the deaths were caused by torcetrapib was 0.007 - which is very statistically significant.

However, if there were only two fewer deaths, 80 instead of 82, the p value would have rose to 0.011. That would still be statistically significant under normal circumstances (signified by a p value < 0.05), but above Pfizer's target threshold of 0.01 for ...

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Great writing all around. Congrats to all who were involved.

And removes two of the most offending negative MD comments:

"Clearly we do see some comments that are overly aggressive like the ones we did delete," he said, referring to two comments one which said a doctor was "the worst of the worst. He butchered me" and another which said, "Are you planning to commit suicide? Go to this doctor and he will kill you."

A disturbing and growing trend. Telephone medicine like this is just asking for trouble:

Already, though, says Dartmouth pediatrics professor James Sargent, there are many situations where doctors call in antibiotic prescriptions and refills "without cause for alarm."

For example, Sargent said via e-mail, his practice often calls in prescriptions for antibiotic drops for pinkeye and pills for sore throats in people who have a family member ...

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Words doctors use to describe patients who Google their own diagnoses.

Physicians are reluctant to adopt EHRs, now comes a study suggesting that patients don't believe that they will improve healthcare:

"Our research shows that American consumers are not banging down any doors for an EHR or a PHR," said James Fisher, national director for Health IT at PricewaterhouseCoopers. "The primary reason for the lack of public support is that the average American does not see a clear value proposition in ...

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$10 million: Not enough

An injured doctor who won $10 million sues his lawyer for legal malpractice.

"Lose weight or die"

Sometimes patients needs to hear it like it is:

Mr Ord, who weighed 33 stone (209.6kg) when he was 16, said he was devastated when told the news by his GP that he had a "very serious problem".

He said he has now ditched his diet of pizzas, chips, pasties and chocolate and goes to the gym three times a week.

He said he was told that ...

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The jig was up over a contested parking ticket:

Barbosa said he planned to file with the court two videos of Pete Costello taken this year: In one, he allegedly feigns retardation during an interview with Social Security workers; the other is of him contesting the traffic ticket in a courtroom earlier this year.

The indictment accuses Costello of faking -- or at least exaggerating -- retardation since August ...

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Medpundit points out one of the endless ways for lawyers continually try to victimize physicians.

A home dialysis diary

Complete with YouTube video.

Demanding X-rays

Many patients believe the "more testing = better medicine" myth. No where is this better seen than in the ER.

A pioneer of the artificial heart, he barely made it as a physician:

Jarvik is a medical doctor, but not with the strongest credentials. When he finished Syracuse University his grades did not permit entry into a U.S. medical school. So, he enrolled at the University of Bologna, Italy, but left after two years. Eventually Jarvik decided the mechanical aspects of the body fascinated him and he earned a ...

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PCPs for physicians

Hypocritically, many physicians don't have primary care docs. An ER doc talks about the difficulties for a physician to obtain one:

I think it's hard for doctors to choose a personal physician. To be honest, there are not many physicians who I would trust enough to follow their recommendations over my own judgment. My standards are high. I've seen too many docs who just get by, floating with ...

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The next chapter in Flea's saga with the ER. Again, I side with the ER on this. Unless you're physically at the hospital and assuming liability, there is no place for a PCP to dictate care over the phone to the ER. If you don't agree with the disposition plan, it's your responsibility go to the hospital at 3am and do what you want. Until then, ...

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Dr. A comes to McDonald's defense:

In my opinion, this Pittsburgh study is another attempt to attack fast food establishments and give parents a free pass on the care of their own children. So, according to this article, the solution is simple - If you want to solve the problem of childhood obesity, go to the hospital cafeteria!

A cardiac surgeon reflects on an ethically-complicated case with a psychiatrist.

Some parents choose to have genetic defects in their children:

In other words, some parents had the painful and expensive fertility procedure for the express purpose of having children with a defective gene. It turns out that some mothers and fathers don't view certain genetic conditions as disabilities but as a way to enter into a rich, shared culture . . .

. . . But a desire ...

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I wonder if a small part of the reason is because for-profit UnitedHealth is banned from providing health insurance there.

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