I'm sure he is representative of many physicians:

Last week I was rushing down the hospital corridor on my way back to the office when a passing nurse cried out "Slow down, Doctor!" I laughed and scurried on as before, and thought about what she was trying to say. Was she afraid I was going to have a heart attack, or just run into some unsuspecting pedestrian? Maybe she was ...

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A tragic misunderstanding by the staff:

A woman died outside a south-east Queensland hospital in what was believed to be a tragic misunderstanding, an Aboriginal council chairman said today.

The woman had been suffering chest pains when she was driven to the Cherbourg Hospital, north-west of Brisbane, by a male friend on Saturday night.

But the man was refused entry to the hospital and when police arrived they ...

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I'm not surprised about this:

Elderly patients hospitalized for suspected pneumonia may be getting antibiotics before their doctor is certain about the diagnosis, a new study suggests.

Among health-care professionals, the practice is known as "shoot first and ask questions later." And the premature use of antibiotics for elderly patients with suspected pneumonia is often done to meet federal performance standards that dictate giving the drugs within four hours ...

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All based on forged prescriptions:

. . . I suspect when all is said and done, we'll be looking at several hundred thousand dollars (street value) of illegally-gotten OxyContin, if not in the millions.

For those of you that don'Â’t know, OxyContin has a street value of about $1 per milligram. That means an 80mg tablet is worth $80 on the street. That means a bottle of 100 is ...

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Some other interesting findings:

A breakdown of the figures revealed a "highly disproportionate" number of complaints were being made against medics trained overseas.

It also found a doctor is 64% more likely to be complained against if they qualified 20 years ago or longer.

Sounds like E. coli O157:H7:

An Epsom couple is suing Shop & Stop, saying their 8-year-old son was infected and nearly killed by E.coli bacteria in meat bought at the one of the company's Manchester stores.

Eric Tsirovakas got sick from a hamburger last September, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Concord. He spent nearly three weeks in the hospital, receiving dialysis treatments after his ...

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The NY Times with the background on this ER physician.

Tragic tale of malignant renal cancer. Were the doctors at fault? Not according to the five independent experts:

To help us channel our anger, Peter's mother suggested we contact Sarah Harman, a lawyer well known for dealing with cases of medical negligence. She enlisted five independent experts to comment on Peter's case, each of whom stated that ruling out cancer had not been the correct way to ...

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More advice from "every patient's advocate".

I've been calling Exubera a dog for awhile. Apparently, this blogger agrees. BusinessWeek with more (btw, they stole my "irrational Exubera" headline):

Janet Ruhl may be Pfizer Inc.'s worst nightmare. Ruhl, who injects a small amount of insulin each day to control her diabetes, has been dissing Pfizer's soon-to-debut diabetes remedy on her new blog and on a Web discussion group. The treatment, Exubera, is ...

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To leave AMA or not

NY Times with a case of a patient wishing to leave AMA and the competence to make that decision.

I didn't know such rankings existed. Golf Digest to the rescue.

Yes, I get it - primary care isn't glamorous. Maybe that's why medical students are avoiding the field:

As a patient's entry point into medical care, primary-care physicians have a far less glamorous job than doctors in other specialties, Leominster pediatrician Terry Callahan said Thursday.

"You're the one getting called in the middle of the night about the right dosage for Tylenol," she said. "You get used ...

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It's a myth that seeds and nuts leads to diverticulitis, perpetuated by this doctor in an article here:

Maddox said that before the attack, Kilpatrick ate a large bag of peanuts, popcorn and sunflower seeds, all of which could have contributed to the flare-up.
UptoDate says otherwise:
Patients with diverticular disease have historically been advised to avoid whole pieces of fiber (such as seeds, corn, and nuts) because of ...

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After reading this physician's rant, her summary points at the end ring true, especially this one:

The American public must "get real." Not every medication is perfect, nor every doctor, nor every procedure. "Yet people want perfection, and when they don't get it, the first thing they want to do is sue somebody."

This doctor-as-patient doesn't feel comfortable when his physician calls him by his first name:

I like calling patients by their surnames. To my mind, it gives an immediate message of respect and also helps keep a suitable emotional distance - both for me and them.

It occurs to me that we've mistaken being caring for being intimate. But as I discovered, when your trousers are round your ankles, ...

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This group has been championing the "less healthcare" for awhile. Here is what they say in the NY Times:

The association of medical colleges has argued that increasing the doctor supply overall can remedy regional shortages. But in the past 20 years, as the number of doctors per capita grew by more than 50 percent, according to our measurements, most of the new ones settled in areas where ...

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The NY Times in its Freakonomics column wonders about this:

There are many reasons, after all, for banning the sale of organs. Some people consider it immoral to commodify body parts (although it is now commonplace to not only sell sperm and eggs but also to rent a womb). Others fear that most organ sellers would be poor while most buyers would be rich; or that someone might be ...

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Some public hospitals are using this approach to close budget gaps left by uninsured patients:

Through a new patient-hospitality service, Jackson is laying down the red carpet for affluent or privately insured patients, especially those in Latin America and the Caribbean, whose wealth or generous insurance coverage gives them choices on where to spend their health-care dollars.

Jackson officials hope that overseas patients, eager to see the University of ...

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These patients want the Australian government to do something:

She believes other women should ask their doctors to refer them to an ultrasound examination, which she said should be subsidised by the government.

"The government needs to step in and revamp the whole system," she said.
Current standard of care is regular mammograms according to the USPSTF. I'm not sure what more the govenment can do. ...

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