There is no good cosmetic surgery for penis enlargement. Especially from this surgeon:

Burman, 80, was once a well-respected heart surgeon until a 1981 car accident limited his mobility and he began operating on penises.

He said he is self-taught in the procedure and has no formal background in urology or plastic surgery.

Is email doomed to concierge practices only? Seems that way:

Some health plans have begun reimbursing doctors who interact with patients on specially created Web sites, but the numbers are still negligible. For the most part, doctors are not paid unless they see patients face to face.

In their offices, doctors are under constant pressure to curtail time spent with patients, said Marcy Zwelling-Aamot, an internist with ...

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At the same time, the federal government is cutting funding for HIV treatment programs.

The authors behind Freakonomics writes about using petri-dish screen savers.

Tough day. GruntDoc and Bard-Parker comment.

Dr. Anna Pou on 60 Minutes



The Attorney General sounds pretty ignorant to me during the piece. Dr. Pou responds:

Asked if she murdered those patients, as the attorney general alleges, she says, "No, I did not murder those patients. Mr. Safer, I've spent my entire life taking care of patients. I have no history of doing anything other than good for my patients. I do the best of my ability. Why would ...

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A Canadian exposes the warts of a single-payer system:

The idea that a state government can pay for virtually every healthcare service and save money doing it can be called many things - –just don't call it Canadian.
(via Medpundit)

Keep up the good fight, Orac.

This physician explains why.

A patient's hidden recording of the office visit was used as evidence:

The patient in this case suspected miscommunication between her and her physician and returned, armed with a hidden tape recorder, to question him. She produced the tape during the ensuing litigation and used it to discredit Dr. H's testimony. Taping your own conversations is legal in most states. Given the success of this strategy, physicians can expect ...

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Office visits are slowly becoming the latter. Like this story of a patient who "demanded" an antibiotic for her $50 co-pay:

After giving the situation a few minutes to cool off, I went back into the room and offered her a compromise. I would give her the antibiotic prescription if she agreed not to fill it unless her symptoms worsened or didn't improve after a week. She quickly and ...

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OBs not coming to Florida not new news. But suggesting that patients start buying malpractice insurance is:

A more short-term fix is to require consumers to do what you do when "flying, driving a car," or other things that involve inherent risk.

"You buy insurance," Dr. Bernick said, suggesting that the tail is wagging the dog somewhat in requiring the doctor to buy the insurance, rather than the ...

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Michael Hebert sees some potential trouble ahead:

So what's the problem, critics may ask. Cheaper drugs for more people. The American way. But there is a possible problem. If Wal-Mart'Â’s list becomes everybody's list, that means Wal-Mart is setting national health care policy. Put another way, someone at Wal-Mart will be deciding if your blood pressure will be treated with atenolol or metoprolol. Or if, after a root canal, your ...

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"What goes into chips goes into you"

We need more ads like that over here.

A case of too good to be true?

So says a BMJ study. Although the study was based in the UK, given the malpractice environment here, I see this worsening Stateside as well.

This is what you get when bureaucrats run health care - a laughable physician quality measure:

He found, for example, that he was faulted for poor treatment of two diabetes patients. The patients in question didn't have diabetes, he said.

Another doctor got a bad rating for failing to order a mammogram for a patient who had already had a double mastectomy, said W. Hugh Maloney, WSMA's president. ...

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Anna Pou speaks

She and the New Orleans Memorial nurses will speak on 60 Minutes this Sunday:

"I have spent my entire life taking care of patients. I have no history of doing anything other than good for my patients," Dr. Anna Pou said in an interview to be aired Sunday on CBS' "60 Minutes." "Why would I suddenly start murdering people?"
More coverage here.

Why would you want this job?

Wanted. Part-time. Private practice seeks obstetrician and gynecologist. Forty hours a week, some nights and weekends. Pretax income $70k/yr and falling. Life-altering medical malpractice claims average only 1/3 years. Electronic medical record - partially functioning. Administrative skills required. Medicare, Medicaid, self-pay, and dozens of insurance plans accepted - billing, coding and prescribing proficiency needed for above ...

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Disgust was the reaction at how he didn't "get it" prior to bariatric surgery. His surgeon did the smart thing and held off on the surgery until he stops binging. Smart thing, since a non-compliant patient like this likely would have had a poor outcome:

His surgeon won't operate until he drops 40 pounds and gains some new perspective.

"It couldn't have went any worse," said Chris ...

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