Medpundit gives a bottom-line take on why there is worsening access to mammograms today. I completely agree.

"On Being a Doctor" is one of my favorite journal reads from the Annals. This particular one is particularly poignant.

I don't think this is an evidence-based approach for asthma.

This solution to rising malpractice premiums makes the most sense to me.

An Alaska surgeon was sued because a patient ignored his advice to go to the emergency room. Again - a failure of personal responsibility has resulted in yet another malpractice suit. Fortunately, the jury was sensible and ruled in favor of the physician. I still have hope yet.

Medical Economics this month discusses the feasibility of no-fault malpractice, similar to automobile accidents and workplace injuries. A fascinating read.

Condoms on-call

Caught without contraception? No fear - in Sweden, they have the condom express to help curb the rise of chlamydia in that country.

So the big story today is how statins can ward off cancer. This is a classic case of media hype of questionable data that was discussed last week. In this case, the data is observational and can hardly be used for any recommendations. Even the article itself recognizes this (of course, not in the title):

However, researchers seem unanimous in saying the evidence is still ...

Read more...

Afghan students are going to great lengths for their gross anatomy education.

There seems to be an emerging problem with C Difficile in Canada, claiming "more lives than SARS". Typically, this is an antibiotic-associated infection treated with flagyl or oral vancomycin. Oral bacitracin and lactobacillus for refractory cases are being studied.

Here's a link to the story that was discussed earlier today. It's gaining some steam around here. I'm sure this happens at every ER - this particular hospital was unjustly singled out.

The story where the woman had to dial 911 from the ER to receive care seems to be getting a lot of play here. The ensuing forum is bringing out more "complaints" against this hospital - it seems that people do not understand that the reason why ERs are so overcrowded is beyond the physicians' control. There are many reasons for this (too many uninsured, poor access to ...

Read more...

I trained in Boston so I periodically keep tabs on the medical scene there. In the same vein of the previous entry I wrote today, comes this story from the Boston Globe.

. . . new patients in Boston wait an average 37 days to see a cardiologist, 45 days to see an obstetrician-gynecologist, and 50 days to see a dermatologist "” the longest waits ...

Read more...

Apparently, some patients are taking action against the long ER waits. From The Bostonchannel.com comes this story of 2 patients. One was a young girl who waited six hours before being seen. It turned out she had appendicities and when she was operated on, the "doctor said she was a mess when he opened her up".

The other case was a 39-yo female who ...

Read more...

. . . from yesterday - certainly looks like a cholesteatoma to me. The patient was sent to an ENT physician. Here is some more information from Medline Plus:

Cholesteatoma can be a congenital defect, but it more commonly occurs as a complication of chronic ear infection. Long-term inflammation and malfunction of the eustachian tube leads to chronic negative pressure in the middle ear. ...

Read more...

Following-up on Galen's entry on Canadian vs US health care, comes an article from the Globe and Mail that discusses a study comparing satisfaction with both systems:

Americans are more enthusiastic about their free-market health-care system than Canadians are about their publicly funded medicare system, but Canadians' care needs are actually better met than those of their U.S. counterparts.

The main beef with the system in the U.S. ...

Read more...


35-yo female came in today with right-sided ear pain. Here is what I found on otoscopic exam. Any ideas?

(Disclaimer: Any pictures shown are not of the patient. All identifying features, including race, age, gender and ethnicity have been modified significantly or fictionalized.)

They sure don't have this kind of food at the hospitals where I work at.

Here's something interesting I came across from Internal Medicine News Online. It discusses whether the media overplays and overpublicizes clinical studies. Some excerpts:

. . . most studies cannot stand alone. "Rarely is a study conclusive enough or broad enough to establish public policy or direct individual action by itself," . . .

. . . Although they might be suitable for journal publication, very few ...

Read more...

Interesting article from the NY Times investigating communication between physicians and patients. Here are some excerpts:

. . . Two decades ago, in 1984, researchers showed that on average, patients were interrupted 18 seconds into explaining their problems. Fewer than 2 percent got to finish their explanations.

. . . Research shows that only 15 percent of patients fully understand what their doctors tell them, and that ...

Read more...

Most Popular