Waqas Khan is the brainchild behind Healthcare Not Fair.  Click his video above to see why we are driving doctors to suicide then join the lively discussion on Facebook.

There’s a window in the driveway to the dental school that always catches my attention.  Usually, the old, horizontal blinds are hanging at a lopsided, half-open-half-closed stance.  Occasionally, though, they are open all the way, and you can see inside. For the first few months of my dental school education, I felt like that was my only window into dentistry: through the obstructed, double-paned division between me and the dental school ...

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"If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it is probably a duck. " At 62 years old, Roberta had been healthy. She walked three miles a day, stayed up late and enjoyed events with her three grandchildren. She had no history of significant surgery, and took only a single pill for blood pressure. The only health tragedy in her life was the death of her last child, an ...

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A reader writes: “Grunting baby syndrome. Is this really a thing? My 6-week-old son grunts, strains, and writhes from approximately 3 to 6 a.m. every night. Most of the time he sleeps through it. My GP suspects reflux but ranitidine has not helped. Also, he’s very happy/calm all day rarely fusses or cries. My Google searching came across grunting baby syndrome. Is that a real thing? When do babies grow out of ...

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Readers know that I believe that servant leadership should inform leadership and management decisions.  We who have the privilege of having leadership positions at medical schools, therefore, have as a primary responsibility to our students. Being a medical student, while a reward and a privilege, is nonetheless a stressful experience.  The first two years at most U.S. medical schools have the students grinding through the basic sciences related to medicine.  The volume ...

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You ask questions.  I answer them on Facebook Live.  Click on the videos above for a replay. I had some technical issues on this one, where the Facebook app kicked me out twice.  Hence, the two videos.  Sorry about that. Send your questions @KevinMD on Twitter with the hashtag #AskKevinMD.

Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 52-year-old man is evaluated during a follow-up visit for a 2-year history of progressively symptomatic rheumatoid arthritis. He reports increased difficulty with his job due to persistent pain and swelling in the first proximal interphalangeal joints, second and third metacarpophalangeal joints, and bilateral wrists. He also has increased difficulty climbing ...

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How would you react if you sent your sputtering car to the auto mechanic, and they stopped trying to diagnose the problem after 15 minutes? You would probably revolt if they told you that your time was up and gave back the keys. Yet in medicine, it's common for practices to schedule patient visits in 15-minute increments -- often for established patients with less complex needs. Physicians face pressure to mind ...

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There are over 400 pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in the USA, as most recently estimated by the Society of Critical Care Medicine. These units vary widely in size, from 4 or 5 beds to fifty or more. The smaller units are generally found in community hospitals; the larger ones are usually in academic medical centers, often in designated children’s hospitals, of which there are 220. Given this size range, it ...

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For almost ten years now, family physicians have been the most recruited specialty in the medical profession, and that is not likely to change anytime soon. We face a huge shortage of primary care physicians that is only going to get worse because we aren’t training family doctors as fast as they are retiring. Business training isn’t in the curriculum What this means for me and my fellow family medicine residents is ...

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We stand outside in the heat. We swat at the occasional persistent mosquito. We try to ignore the sweat beading down our foreheads and the backs of our necks. We retreat to the deepest recesses of shade we can find. We wish for a hint of a wisp of a smidgen of a breeze. We hold court on life and love. We laugh and tease and are determined to have ...

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A woman in her mid-thirties with a terrible limp and a past surgical history in the dozens became my patient two years ago. Her prosthetic left leg served her well, but her right leg was moving awkwardly because of advanced hip arthritis and a formerly shattered ankle. She was on long-acting morphine and short acting oxycodone. Her Social Security disability insurance didn’t cover the long-acting form of oxycodone. She told me several ...

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As physicians, we are charged with extending empathy to our patients. In addition to a professional responsibility, empathy is also a mechanism for improving patient care and professional satisfaction. It has been associated with better patient satisfaction, clinical outcomes, fewer medical errors and lawsuits, as well as provider happiness. However, while physicians can be expected to pursue the ideal of empathy towards individual patients, that of empathizing with populations is ...

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You ask questions.  I answer them on Facebook Live.  Click on the video above for a replay. Send your questions @KevinMD on Twitter with the hashtag #AskKevinMD. Join my Facebook page get notified about future live chats.

I am a doctor daughter. I am exhausted. My emotions are bubbling close to the surface, and I fear that at any moment, someone will do or say something to me that will cause me to lose control, which I’m not allowed to do because I’m also a female physician in a leadership role, and our emotions must be held in check. I watched one of my mentors be memorialized last ...

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I was saddened to hear that one of my favorite libertarians, the wonderful journalist John Stossel, has taken ill. True to form, however, he's taking it in stride (he nonchalantly quipped, "seems I have lung cancer"), and I want to take this opportunity to wish him very well indeed. I enjoy his reporting and writing, and have learned a great deal from Mr. Stossel over the years. But that doesn't mean he's always ...

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You ask your patient to follow instructions and when they see you at their subsequent visit, they have not made the changes you suggested. We have all been there, often placing the blame on their lack of interest in their health. Have you ever thought to dig a little deeper? The average American reads at a middle school level. There have been a series of studies trying to shed light and ...

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Almost every day over the last few years, someone has written about physician burnout or depression. The problems begin in medical school. A recent paper featured drawings that medical students had done depicting faculty as monsters. One student felt so intimidated during a teaching session that she drew a picture of her urinating herself. peeing The paper equated faculty and residents supervising students ...

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I remember seeing so many charts in my career on which the well-meaning emergency room physician wrote the following:  "Follow up with your primary care doctor."  Or, if they didn’t have one, "Follow up in one week with a primary care doctor."  I laughed to myself.  Usually, the people we say that to have either no insurance, inadequate insurance or inadequate motivation to even call the persons to whom we ...

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The last couple of decades have seen a dramatic shift of power and clout away from individual physicians and towards administrators and the business side of health care. In many ways, physicians have nobody but themselves to blame collectively; because for any large and respected group of people to surrender so much autonomy so quickly, a lack of strong leadership must always be a factor. So many different reasons for this ...

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