An uncommon diagnosis, by way of Google. "When you Google a set of symptoms, you don't get the most common or the most likely diseases; you get the diseases with the greatest number of links from other Web sites. Her Google search brought up dozens of fairly unusual, but well-linked, illnesses . . ."

True words about primary care: "We pay doctors fairly well to do procedures on people. We don't pay particularly well for consultation and managing . . . Then we're surprised that doctors don't spend a lot of time with patients."

A Boston hospital is trying ban people from smoking in front of its building.

Coming soon? A pill to treat compulsive gambling.

Mudslinging in Washington state. "The key to the doctors' strategy is obvious: prey on the unpopularity of trial lawyers.

They put up a campaign Web site called 'theirlipsaremoving.com' "” the punch line to the joke 'How can you tell when a lawyer is lying?'

Their TV ads are filled with demeaning images of lawyers: giving each other high fives while throwing darts at a picture of a ...

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Required reading on Health Care Renewal, regarding the farce of homeopathy, "me-too" drugs, and minute clinics.

39% of doctors said they would stop caring for families that refused vaccinations.

You think? "Dr. Helmut Ahlert told police he hoped to start work soon as an anesthesiologist at Mercy Hospital, but that job was likely jeopardized Sunday after he was charged with drug possession."

More telephone medicine woes: A doctor missed a fatal sepsis while trying to treat over the phone. "She said events would have been different if she knew he was in pain and that his shoulder was discoloured."

How much do smokers spend on cigarettes during their lifetime? Over $162,000.

How are hospitals bringing in more revenue? By building bigger ER's.

The plight of depression in the elderly. "As far as I'm concerned, you're just lumped in as a little old lady on your way out."

Lawyers are keeping close tabs at the Vioxx trial. "Sam Davis is here sizing up the witnesses, jurors, judge and dynamics at play in the trial looking for anything that might give him an edge when he gets his day in court.

With 100 Vioxx lawsuits already filed and hundreds of other would-be plaintiffs on retainer, Davis, a trial lawyer from Teaneck, 133 miles away, is keenly interested in ...

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Can Tedy Bruschi return to football?

It has been confirmed that Tedy Bruschi's stroke was indeed caused by a patent foramen ovale (PFO), as speculated here. He underwent percutaneous repair at Massachusetts General Hospital, either with a Amplatzer PFO occluder or CardioSEAL/STARFlex (picture below) - most likely the latter since this is the preferred PFO occluder used at MGH. Contrary to ...

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For those who are interested, I have created a medical headline and blog feed page, where medical news from major media and popular medblogs are updated throughout the day. Enjoy!

Medical media companies and blogging. ". . . a media company ignores blogging at its peril. But since the blogger may be the author, editor, publisher, advertiser, critic, reviewer, and owner -- all at the same time -- and fake the whole thing, a trustworthy medical media company may embrace unfiltered blogging at its even greater peril." (via KidneyNotes)

A blow to Merck in the Vioxx trial. "There were fireworks in the courtroom this morning as Superior Court Judge Carol Higbee came down hard on Merck's legal team for trying to get around court rules on testimony.

The day before, the plaintiff's attorney, Chris Seeger, made a motion to strike some testimony from Merck's lead witness, Briggs Morrison, a vice president for research. Seeger argued Morrison went too ...

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A tough day fishing.



(via Boing Boing)

Kent Bottles on the malpractice crisis. "Physicians are perceived by the public as over-promising and under-delivering when it comes to health care. Perhaps part of the problem is that we have been so successful at treating some acute conditions, that patients live long enough to suffer from the chronic conditions that we do not treat as effectively."

JAMA: Implications of cerebral palsy litigation. "Judges, jurors, and most plaintiffs in CP lawsuits may be unaware of the fallibility of the high-tech gadgetry of modern obstetrics, including EFM, and may not realize that these devices cannot reliably predict or influence obstetric outcome. The plaintiff's attorney has the double advantage of the undeserved suffering by a child and family and a simple, seemingly reasonable explanation. That may not be enough ...

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