When is the best time to persuade smokers to quit? Right after a cancer diagnosis:

Studies show that using the moment of diagnosis to initiate smoking cessation programs can help up to 70% of patients quit, she and her colleagues wrote, compared with the 20% success rate that is usual in the general population, the researchers argue.
I wonder if the same is true after a heart attack.

Some with spinal cord injuries are travelling to China for experimental surgery. "Paralyzed in May 2003 while performing a backward flip in a cheerleading stunt, Laura, 16, underwent experimental surgery in China late last year and pursues therapies she and her parents, Daryl and Melody, find promising.

Her story illustrates how some people with spinal cord injuries and their families are devising their own solutions and remedies, even building ...

Read more...

Some are questioning the findings of this radiologist, who solely reads x-rays for asbestos lawsuits:

According to the transcript of a deposition in 2004 , Dr. Harron graduated from New York Medical College in 1957, completed an internship at the United States Marine Hospital in New York in 1958, was a radiology resident in New Orleans and then moved to West Virginia in 1961, where he practiced as a ...

Read more...

over my med body! hosts Grand Rounds this week. Come get the weekly best of the medical blogosphere.

Fat buttocks require longer needles: They needed a study for this? "Fatter rear ends are causing many drug injections to miss their mark, requiring longer needles to reach buttock muscle, researchers said on Monday.

Standard-sized needles failed to reach the buttock muscle in 23 out of 25 women whose rears were examined after what was supposed to be an intramuscular injection of a drug.

Two-thirds of the 50 ...

Read more...

retired doc wonders about FPs giving CME drug talks. "So why are they chosen to speak about certain topics to a group that typically consists of FPs, NPs and internists? Maybe they believe that if primary care docs listen to another primary care doctor who is apparently very comfortable in managing bipolar patients,they will have fewer qualms in prescribing the latest atypical antipsychotic medication for the next bipolar patient. ...

Read more...

"Shy pee". "Some four million people in the UK are unable to urinate in public toilets because of a social phobia commonly called "shy pee", it is claimed.

Experts have called on the medical profession to be more aware of the condition as sufferers can wait decades before seeking treatment."

10 percent of children ages 2 to 5 have "obvious" psychiatric illness.

A little bit of research can be far more dangerous when taken out of context. "Research is complicated and, often, in boiling it down to a few easily digested sound bites, the full complexity and meaning of the information is lost in the media. It is worth remembering that
sometimes a little bit of knowledge can be far more dangerous than the
very crisis it concerns."

Nominations are underway for the 2005 Medical Weblog Awards. "Welcome to the second annual Medical Weblog Awards! These awards are designed to honor the very best in the medical blogosphere, as decided by you--the readers of these fine medical blogs.

It's been another year filled with explosive growth, stirring debate, and excellent writing -- in a number of fields. Our categories reflect this diversity. The categories for this ...

Read more...

The online Medicare help site sounds good, until you realize that only 20 to 30 percent of all seniors go online.

Cheerleaders make good drug reps. "Known for their athleticism, postage-stamp skirts and persuasive enthusiasm, cheerleaders have many qualities the drug industry looks for in its sales force. Some keep their pompoms active, like Onya, a sculptured former college cheerleader. On Sundays she works the sidelines for the Washington Redskins. But weekdays find her urging gynecologists to prescribe a treatment for vaginal yeast infection." (via DB's Medical Rants)

Merck will cut 7,000 jobs. Note to the Texas Vioxx jury: Consider the message sent.

The exodus of nurses and doctors from the Philippines has left the country's own health system in a state of near collapse. For no charge, I will offer my solution - pay higher salaries:

But above all, the study found, salaries were a major factor, averaging $3,000 to $4,000 a month, compared with $180 to $220 a month in the Philippines.

More on the rising C-section rates. "Locally, doctors say C-sections are definitely more prevalent than they were several decades ago, and they agree that malpractice lawsuits and concerns about vaginal births after Caesarean sections are major reasons why. But they downplayed mothers' desire to schedule births as much of a factor."

"Why should I care about how much my doctor has to spend for insurance? Doctors make WAY more than I do, so can't they afford it?" "In Chester County, PA, there isn't a single fulltime neurosurgeon on staff at any of the county's five hospitals, which serve 450,000 residents. There used to be six fulltime neurosurgeons in the county - before rising premiums drove them to other positions and other ...

Read more...

Good for business: "Ms. Bennett has had the nerve to apply for a job seven miles from home, to avoid what can be a four- hour commute to work in Washington should there be rain or rubbernecking. She wants to be close if her kids get sick, or even to have lunch with them sometimes. She gamely shared her story with me about how she wants a new job--and ...

Read more...

Kidney swap: "They were strangers who shared a dire dilemma: two women whose husbands each needed a kidney but who could not give one of their own to their spouse.

After being brought together by a hospital and arranging a swap in which each woman donated a kidney to the other's husband, they planned to share Thanksgiving dinner on Thursday to celebrate the arrangement that saved two lives and ...

Read more...

"Fat people continue to be perceived as greedy and indolent pariahs, who refuse to exercise any self-control over their eating habits." Commentary on the NHS' decision to restrict surgery to obese patients.

Intervening "pre-code": "Howell hopes the team will prevent delays like one he described to the Beth Israel Deaconess board of directors last month: Doctors admitted an elderly man to the hospital for gastric bleeding. When his systolic blood pressure dipped into the 80s, his nurse and an intern gave him intravenous fluids to push it back up to normal range. His pressure climbed back into normal range. Over the ...

Read more...

Most Popular