Regarding the surplus of Texas physicians:

What happened next is worth remembering the next time you feel cynical about politics. The legislature took steps to make it cheaper, and they worked.

Our state leaders effectively lowered the cost of medical malpractice insurance 20 percent by capping the awards for "non-economic" damages that lawyers could win against doctors. Runaway verdicts became a thing of the past. The medical malpractice ...

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Students in the UK are having the study on pre-dissected bodies.

Benjamin Brewer writes about primary care today:

The doctor-patient relationship started to go downhill when patients stopped paying their own office bills for routine care and third-party insurance and Medicare became the driving forces. That was before my time.

Now primary-care doctors are pressured to churn patients through the office, to the detriment of relationship-building and possibly the health of their patients. At the same time, patients may ...

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This is consistent with the woo that AMSA continues to push:

At participating med schools, students are being taught to ask patients what, if any, alternative therapies they are using "” if for no other reason than to flag practices that could interfere with their medical treatment. Some herbs, for example, can interfere with the body's absorption of certain drugs.
(via The WSJ Health Blog)

The Cheerful Oncologist looks at a recent decision in Nova Scotia to deny Avastin.

Employee physicians

Chris Rangel reflects on the problems with this:

The main problem for employee physicians is related to the employer-employee relationship and the fact that the priorities of both are different. The main goal of the employer is to maximize profits and minimize costs but often this leads to excessive workloads where the compensation is almost always less than what the doc would be able to take home if they were ...

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Oh, and you get free health care too:

I favor a Cuban-style approach. First, we need to abolish political parties and if necessary imprison, exile, or execute politicians who refuse to accept the new order. Then we should severly curtail the traditional civil liberties that we currently enjoy. I'd start with the press and shut down newspapers and television stations that did not support the government. For good measure I'd ...

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Something I actually agree with. His take on the CNN/Moore debacle:

Michael Moore elicits a very specific type of status anxiety in mainstream journalists. Moore's product -- passionate, provocative political commentary -- is a close cousin of the media's product -- bloodless, boring political commentary. And Moore is a former journalist, an editor at papers in Flint, Michigan and Mother Jones. What he does is, broadly speaking, in ...

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Derek Lowe says it's falling behind that US:

Phrases like "fair reward for innovation" and "alternative pricing and reimbursement mechanisms" point to one that might. These seem to be carefully worded calls to let the drug companies make a bit more money, in the hopes that they might find it worthwhile to make some more drugs.

Metformin and/or a generic sulfonylurea continues to be recommended. MedPage Today with more.

Half of PCPs in the NHS make more than 100,000 pounds (about $200,000). So the arguments for maintaining the status quo "just being about the money" somewhat rings false.

A GP and mayor of Amite, LA loses a malpractice suit:

Records say that Goldsby failed to properly monitor and treat Hendry's high blood sugar levels, prescribed high doses of steroids to a diabetic patient, failed to properly work up and follow his patient, failed to monitor and treat Hendry's dehydration, failed to monitor and treat his Coumadin levels and in general permitted Hendry's condition to deteriorate to the point ...

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Katrina hero Anna Pou is suing the Attorney General:

Pou, 51, was among the medical professionals stranded in the flooded city without power or means of escape for four days at Memorial Medical Center in 2005. Despite the mandatory evacuation issued by the city, Pou and her colleagues stuck it out amid the disastrous conditions.

Still waiting on an Orleans Parish Grand Jury's decision whether to charge her ...

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Just increase the supply:

In order for any good or service to become cheaper and more widely available, one of two things must occur: 1) the production of the good or service must increase, or 2) the demand for the good or service must decrease. The second of these alternatives is very unlikely to occur in the healthcare industries in the United States over the next couple of decades, simply ...

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The health care industry is now one of the larger supporters of the Clinton campaign.

Very handy guide that all patients should read. (via lifehacker)

Sid Schwab's take on the use of prayer in a terminal cancer case:

I've mentioned religion before, relating how, as a surgeon, I've seen faith, for some people, make facing deadly illness easier. (I've also indicated that I've seen it accomplish just the opposite.) Patients' faith clearly can make it easier for me, when giving bad news and when caring for the dying. But this. These prayer circles, this ...

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It looks like surgeons are already starting to turn away high-risk patients to improve their scores:

Nuno was furious with the rating. "I've had a very illustrious career, and when my name comes out tomorrow I might just retire," he said in a phone interview. "Nobody in the state is going to write right next to your name that Dr. Nuno tried really hard to keep this patient alive. ...

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A natruropath crusader attacks the scientific method and conventional medicine. Dr. RW rebukes his claims.

Shadowfax does an LP on someone with a BMI over 50. This can certainly lead to a loss of anatomical landmarks - and essentially the procedure is done blind.

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