Workers' comp for starting a fight in a hockey game. "Jones, a right-wing power forward with the Admirals, instigated a fight with an opposing player during a game in 2002. Jones said the coach told him to 'go get' the player.

Jones got hurt, and an orthopedic surgeon later put six screws in his right shoulder. The athlete wore a sling for almost six months.

In 2004, Jones ...

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Merck and Vioxx: Day 2

PointofLaw.com: "The Ernst verdict of $253 million was on the front page of newspapers; the Humeston verdict was buried in the business section, something that can only heighten the "Oprah effect" in future cases. Jurors don't have any way of sending a message to plaintiffs as loud as the message they can send to defendants. It'll also be interesting to see if the Humeston jurors get the same financial opportunities ...

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What happens if both I-330 and I-336 pass in Washington? The Seattle Times looks at the possible scenarios.

Supporters for Dr. Bennett: "Most of them were overweight and said Bennett gives them the same spiel because he cares about them."

I guess his "straight-talk" isn't working very well.

Broken system: Americans spend more on care, and receive more medical errors. "The survey of nearly 7,000 sick adults in the United States, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Britain and Germany found Americans were the most likely to pay at least $1,000 in out-of-pocket expenses. More than half went without needed care because of cost, the survey found, and more than a third endured mistakes and disorganized care when they did ...

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PharmaEdge:
"Clearly, pharmaceutical companies have a responsibility to inform the public about the dangers of the products they sell. Twelve New Jerseyans, however, have provided us with news that that liability is limited. Just having a heart attack while taking Vioxx, at least in this case, is not sufficient to collect the Big Money."

The Uncooperative Blogger:
"I am glad it turned out this way, because I was afraid ...

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Derek Lowe analyzes the government's flu plan.

Merck wins the second Vioxx trial. "After deliberating for less than eight hours over three days, the jury cleared Merck of allegations it failed to warn consumers about the drug's risks and engaged in 'unconscionable commercial practices' in marketing it to doctors and their patients . . .

. . . Merck repeatedly reminded jurors that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had approved it as safe and ...

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Bizarre non-medical news story of the week: Man sues Home Depot after being glued to a toilet. "His lawsuit, filed Friday, said Dougherty was recovering from heart bypass surgery at the time and thought he was having a heart attack. A store employee who heard him calling for help informed the head clerk via radio, but the head clerk 'believed it to be a hoax,' the lawsuit said."

Update:

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Orac: Parents win custody of their child, pulling her out of a hospital so they can administer vitamin C "therapy". "I suppose it could be argued that, because, thanks to her parents' intransigence, Katie's odds of survival are so poor anyway, she might as well spend her remaining time with the family who loves her, rather than being forced to spend her limited time remaining in a foster home ...

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Another flu shot debacle? Now even supermarkets are running out of flu shots:

Maxim Health Systems, the force behind the vaccination clinics in many supermarkets and drugstores, is still awaiting nearly a third of its 2.2 million-plus order and will say only that it is assessing things 'day to day.'

Dr. Bennett is making his case to the Board of Medicine. "It would be nice if this woman had any legal basis whatsoever to have continued this case to this point in time. She has arrogated power onto herself and the board which is not existent in the body and laws of this land. In asserting what she says, she denied the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights. She is ...

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Beginning of the end: Medicare is cutting its reimbursement rates. "Final federal rules issued Wednesday will cut Medicare's reimbursement rates for doctors next year by 4.4 percent while increasing payments for most hospitals by at least 3.7 percent."

In a fee-for-service system, what will this do? See more patients, order more tests. The squeeze continues.

They're coming out with an antibacterial cell phone. (via Medgadget)

News flash: CEOs like universal health insurance - but don't want to pay for it.

Dallas Mavericks basketball players undergo $5,000 physicals twice a year: a group wants all high school athletes to do similarly extensive physicals. "Mavs undergo stress tests, echocardiograms, stress echoes, body scans, the works . . .

. . . Putting aside moral and ethical issues, it just makes good business sense at the pro level. Fortune 500 companies submit their top-level executives to extensive physicals, and they don't ...

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Sticking to the evidence. Easier said than done:

The question is never 'Doctor, how little can you do to treat my illness effectively?' And the answer is never, 'Let's wait a while.' Instead, it's a quick rush to the imaging room, to the surgical suite, or to the pharmacy downstairs. The costs are clear to us all: a $1.7 trillion annual health-care tab that is growing again, and as fast ...

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An infectious disease specialist is resourceful in treating a 10-week old infant in flight. "A doctor saved the life of a Liverpool baby using a bottle of lemonade after she became ill on a long-haul flight, it emerged last night.

The 10-week-old girl was on board a flight to Dubai with her mother and grandparents when she became ill two weeks ago.

Her frantic family called cabin ...

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A doctor is suggesting using probenicid to extend the half-life of Tamiflu. "Howton was browsing through safety data published by the drug's Swiss manufacturer Roche when he noticed that giving Tamiflu with probenecid doubles the number of hours its active ingredient is in the blood."

Armed guards may be needed to protect Tamiflu-containing clinics and hospitals from mobs. "Police guards will be placed on doctors' surgeries and NHS clinics in the event of a flu pandemic to stop panicking crowds from trying to get their hands on antiviral drugs."