Hospital employment

It's back in style, writes Richard Reece:

Today, it is specialists and sub-specialists and hospitalists, who are hot when it comes to physician employment. For hospitals, salaried specialists fill a void "“ in-house patient coverage, ER coverage, and prestige in the community.

For the physician, other factors are at work "“ a predictable 40 hour week, which fits the life styles of young or burnt-out physicians, a refuge ...

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A study suggests the obese may have a better prognosis after a heart attack. Dr. Crippen with his own take on the study:

The life time risk of heart attack is predominantly a function of the hand of cards you are dealt at birth. The fatties may have been lower risk at birth, but have brought the disease prematurely upon themselves. The thinnies were probably always high risk ...

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Complete with pictorial, including surgery to remove 22.5 pounds of skin. (via plasticized.com)

A survey asks a group of Americans living in Canada to pick which health care system they preferred.

PLoS Medicine thinks regulation is in order:

Lacking the will or ability to regulate itself, the adult film industry needs state and federal legislation to enforce health and safety standards for adult film performers. Local officials lack the authority to impose fines and Cal/OSHA's monitoring and enforcement capability is limited. Short of legislation mandating performer protection, restricting distribution of adult movies to condom-only films may be the one way to ...

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CNN profiles the physician social network:

It doesn't get a penny from advertising, job listings, or membership fees. Rather, it makes its money by charging institutional investors for the opportunity to listen in as doctors chat among themselves.
(via PharmaGossip)

OnThePharm tells us what to do in these cases.

Update:
GruntDoc comments.

Don't go to Sicko looking for any:

Moore ignores the positive side altogether. For all its problems, the United States still provides the highest-quality health care in the world. 18 of the last 25 winners of the Nobel Prize in Medicine either are U.S. citizens or work here. With no price controls, free-market U.S. medicine provides the incentives that lead to innovation breakthroughs in new drugs and other medical technologies.

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The main target is looking like Katrina hero Dr. Anna Pou. If so, the travesty worsens:

Sources close to the investigation told CNN the two nurses are expected to testify before the grand jury in the next two weeks, which could signal a possible wrapping up of the case. It could also signal the main target of the investigation is Pou, a physician who was under contract with ...

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Joe Paduda writes about the zealots pushing a Medicare-for-all approach at Take Back America. He asks one unanswered question amongst all the cheerleading: can it control costs?

The level of anger and frustration expressed by attendees was palpable, and loud, and high. Unfortunately the level of misinformation and misunderstanding was equally high.

For example, no one asked about Medicare's complete inability to control costs. The core issue in ...

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Health Care Renewal on the WSJ's editorial on Nissen and Avandia:

So the Wall Street Journal's new whirl has kept the Avandia spin cycle merrily revolving. This spin cycle continues to distract from what I think, in my humble opinion, are really the major questions.

The first question is clinical: what are the benefits and harms of rosiglitazone as a treatment of Type 2 diabetes, and therefore for ...

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Bang the Drum with some analysis of whether a government-run health care system is possible in America:

To accomplish any meaningful reform, Americans will have to dismantle the insurance and pharma lobbies at a minimum, and begin to tackle the question of how to deliver universal health care without tying it to employment, marital status, or other qualifiers (and figure out how to put all those unemployed pharma and ...

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Criticism of the NEJM continues in the Avandia mess:

NEJM executive editor Gregory Curfman told BioCentury, a publication covering the drugs industry. 'What happens in the media is beyond our control."

The problem with that statement is that it looks as if NEJM did everything it possibly could to ensure that the study by Nissen and Kathy Wolski made headlines: It was given expedited peer-review; it was accompanied ...

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There is a boom in community health centers. The problem is, finding physicians to staff them:

Administration officials say they are doing their part, increasing health center funding by $645 million (about 48 percent) since the beginning of the 2002 fiscal year. Much of the money goes to hire and pay medical professionals, said James Macrae, associate administrator for primary health care in the Health Resources and Services ...

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They are not happy with his proposals to stop frivolous lawsuits. But really, how serious are Edwards' proposals anyways?.

Google Health

A former primary care physician joins Google and outlines their plans in health. (via Kidney Notes)

Physicians have to walk a fine line of diagnosis when faced with potential autism cases.

Derek Lowe predicts a swift decline after a strong start:

It's there to keep you on a low-fat diet, and to make you pay if you stray. If you're taking orlistat but go out and eat a bucket of fried chicken, you're going to regret that excursion for years to come. Generally, people just gradually seem to stop taking the stuff regularly, which makes it less likely to do anything, ...

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Dr. Rob sets the record straight about a recent study.

OnThePharm with an illustrated primer.

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