The doctor took the fall for the nurse's mistake. The nurse apparently ignored several red flags:

Rohart, an ER specialist for eight years and a doctor since 1989, said he ran tests and prescribed 800 milligrams of the anti-seizure drug Dilantin. "She and I were laughing when I left for the day," Rohart said.

But Cooper instead administered 8000 mg (eight grams), quickly stopping Plass' heart, hospital officials ...

Read more...

SoloDoc brings to light the persecution of a PCP in North Dakota:

Does a medical board alone have the power to decide what is appropriate care/conduct and what the sanction should be? If the medical board decides that a sloppy appearance is unprofessional and worthy of license forfeiture, is that their unquestionable right? What if they decide that pregnancy termination or withdrawal of life support is malpractice? Dating a ...

Read more...

. . . or for Super Bowl tickets. (via Dr. Wes)

Almost a quarter of ER visits in this LA emergency room are for non-emergent issues:

Hernandez, 45, is among a relatively small "” but extremely costly "” group of patients known in the field as "frequent fliers." They are chronic users of the emergency room whose care would be far less expensive, and who would probably be less sick, if they were seen regularly in a primary-care clinic.

He ...

Read more...

Here's what he had to say about the Celebrex pen:

This pen is awesome. A real work of art, with faux jade grip. And it is heavy. I like that a lot. But the clicker piece is pretty cheap and I think I'm going to break it if I carry it around. I'm sticking with Vytorin, at least in writing implements.
(via PharmaGossip)

The New Yorker writes about the pitfalls of clinical suspicion:

Doctors typically begin to diagnose patients the moment they meet them. Even before they conduct an examination, they are interpreting a patient's appearance: his complexion, the tilt of his head, the movements of his eyes and mouth, the way he sits or stands up, the sound of his breathing. Doctors' theories about what is wrong continue to evolve as they ...

Read more...

Amy Ridenour continues the attack on single-payer medicine.

They come out firing both barrels:

Recently, Gov. Schwarzenegger announced his plan to provide universal coverage for health care and declared a war on physicians. We were shocked and appalled to learn that the Governator actually wants to penalize us, clinical providers, with a 2% gross revenue tax that will hit MDs with high operating costs especially hard. His action comes at a time when we are already experiencing ...

Read more...

Complications arose from his gastric bypass surgery at Man's Greatest Hospital Massachusetts General Hospital. Patriots QB Tom Brady is expected to be a plaintiff witness:

In the Weis case, Ferguson and Hodin may need to counter a report by Dr. Steven J. Smith, a Florida surgeon hired by Weis's legal team, who concluded the Mass. General physicians provided substandard care and treatment resulting in Weis's excessive bleeding, septic ...

Read more...

The beginnings of a fee-for-service payment model. Sound familiar?

Provinces should fund hospitals based on the number of patients they treat instead of handing over a lump sum that forces them to close beds and operating rooms when the money runs out, says the incoming head of the Canadian Medical Association.

Dr. Brian Day said the result of the current way of doing things, the so-called global funding ...

Read more...

This medical student argues yes:

U.S. schools will only admit students who have proven that they can excel academically and otherwise, while many Caribbean schools are willing to accept students who have less than perfect academic records, with the caveat that they have to prove themselves.

Most students at my school would agree that they have been given an extra chance -- a chance to prove that they ...

Read more...

A Zyprexa rep tells all

height="350" width="425">

(via PharmedOut)

The scoop behind the medical marijuana scene in California:

Before the next week could come a friend of mine text messaged me about a "Prescription Party" he was having where a Doctor would be signing prescriptions (for a fee of course). I showed up late and most people had gone home or drank and smoked themselves into a stupor. Lucky for me the Doctor was included in the drunk, ...

Read more...

Americans are Canada's Mexicans. Too bad his solution is a single-payer system.

Despite all the outside forces that turn physicians and patients into adversaries, this doctor remembers what's most important:

The doctor-patient relationship is more than a commercial transaction between retailers and customers; it is a sacred bond in which both parties are interdependent. It is the place where doctors and patients become allies.

Much has happened in the medical profession and in society at large to loosen and misfocus ...

Read more...

Expect Wal-Mart to follow. This is good news for patients, bad news for Pfizer and Lipitor.

Shadowfax with more excellent analysis. Certainly seems more appealing than California's recent reform proposal:

I do not know whether this bill has a chance of becoming law -- certainly the odds are stacked against it. But it is the first proposal for health care reform I am familiar with, which does not seem to contain any lethal flaws. It achieves much of the goals of a single payer ...

Read more...

Dr. RW says that there's nothing to differentiate general internal medicine from FPs:

Worse yet, the proposals are another failure of the ACP to reclaim the identity of internal medicine. In defining the way internists fill the primary care role the proposals make no distinction from family practice. Is it any wonder there is a growing perception that the only way to be an internist is to be a ...

Read more...

It seems endless. And these are just Pfizer's. (via Peter Rost)

A sculpture that can be yours, on eBay.

Most Popular