80 percent of the committee are specialists: "Their bias is adding to the income gap between specialists and primary care physicians."

How increasing specialization is another factor driving up health care costs:

Changing the way medical school works could also help alleviate the problem, Frey said. Currently, the number of slots available for different specializations is not based on society`s needs. The high number of specialists, in turn, creates more demand for expensive services.

An ER doc talks about the ridiculousness of the pain scale:

"Oh at least a 10. Can I put 11? Or 12? It's way off the scale." Vicki wrote 10 in the box. This meant she was supposed to give strong pain medicine, quickly. Another quick look from Vicki; she had only been in the room for two minutes with this patient yet she already had the same feeling, one ...

Read more...

Bizarre turn of events:

A Suffolk Superior Court judge declared a mistrial in former Patriot coach Charlie Weis's medical malpractice lawsuit today after two doctors involved in the case came to the aid of juror who passed out during testimony.

The juror began audibly gasping and collapsed at about 10:15 a.m. Several doctors -- including the two surgeons accused of botching Weis's gastric bypass -- rushed to help. People ...

Read more...

A NT Times essay paints a picture of pioneering open heart surgery in children 42 years ago.

The law in Italy states that minors must defer the decision to their parents.

ACEP is the latest. It would be nice if the AMA and ACP joined them with their own blogs.

John Mack looks at drug advertising to teens. So wrong.

Chris Rangel thinks so:

The average American plans neither for retirement nor for future health care costs even though it is well within the fiscal ability of most of us to do so. The usual scenario is to spend like fiends for 40 years and then let the tax payers pick up the tab. This is usually advantageous since the average American tends to utilize far more health care dollars ...

Read more...

Does it undermine PBS's credibility?

My view is that Chester's eagle-eye provides a continuing, very useful challenge to PBS, a challenge that I agree with even though I sympathize with PBS's constant search for funding, the difficulty of finding sponsorships to bolster more traditional funding, and that fact that some funders simply have an interest in seeing subjects aired and are willing to take their chances on how the ...

Read more...

Sid Schwab tries to find some use for the appendix.

Sad:

Children as young as 12 are being diagnosed as alcoholics amid growing concerns about binge-drinking in Britain, an investigation by The Independent on Sunday reveals today.

Record numbers of pre-teens and teenagers now require hospital treatment for drink-related disorders, the exclusive nationwide survey shows.

The findings prove there is a hidden epidemic of child alcoholism, resulting in thousands of youngsters being treated in hospital each year ...

Read more...

Richard Reece worries about the further "codification" of medicine if the government takes over:

She describes what Medicare does and what a universal coverage system will do "“ make capricious and arbitrary decisions based on diagnostic codes and numeric quotas. Government has no other choice: its functionaries are too far removed from care sites to make clinically relevant decisions based on personal needs, so it must resort to impersonal ...

Read more...

The grim realities facing primary care today. More are responding to it this way: "I left medicine 2-1/2 years ago; have gone to law school. I graduate in the spring. Let me know if I can help." (via a reader tip)

For all that money, you get an uptime of about 88% on some days, and less that 80% in certain locations. Not good for a project seen as a "possible national model".

The sperm bank arms race

Increasingly demanding women want "proof of perfection before buying a dream donor's sperm."

TIME.com looks at its limits:

Medicine, after all, is a personalized service, one built around the uniqueness of each patient and the skilled physician's ability to design care accordingly. "I'm worried about training a generation of physicians who don't have the other skills they need for the optimal practice of medicine," says Dr. Mark Tonelli, a pulmonary-care specialist at the University of Washington in Seattle. "They can read the scientific ...

Read more...

A woman in labor was told by a nurse to look in the phone book to find the nearest hospital.

Someone studied this. You can lose almost 30 pounds playing just over 12 hours per week.

More horror stories from countries some want the US to emulate.

Most Popular