She is a proponent of CT-scans for early lung cancer detection, and doesn't get that randomized-controlled studies are the only standard. The rules can't be rewritten for her cause:

"I don't get what the resistance is," Dr. Henschke said.To her, it is a matter of simple logic: the earlier cancer is found, the better the odds of a cure. CT finds lung cancer early. So why not use ...

Read more...

Should PFOs be sealed?

The medical device makers certainly hope so, they have lots of profit at stake. Patriots linebacker Tedy Bruschi had his sealed, chronicled here extensively.

It's touted as the 15-second heart scan that saves lives. Of course, cost isn't mentioned. You bet that once it's available, it will be a routine cya ER test. And we wonder why health costs are out of control.

Boston Magazine writes on the controversies and challenges facing The Journal. Primarily on its relationship with pharmaceuticals, and its association with the Massachusetts Medical Society. Required reading.

Yes, it does.

I have maintained that not vaccinating children is akin to child abuse. Here's taking it one step further:

Respectful Insolence and Kevin, M.D., characterize parents who refuse to vaccinate their children as guilty of child neglect. I'll go one step further. These parents' selfish decisions are hurting more than their own children. By defeating one of the core missions of public health -- that of conferring herd immunity from ...

Read more...

Remember, their priority is money, not health care, as seen in the recent NCQA rankings:

Health care is a public good, not just an industry, to be governed by the same economic principles that govern pure business. Value in health care can only be assessed by weighing cost and quality together. Quality health coverage not only improves care, it saves lives.

UnitedHealth's record in this regard, as measured ...

Read more...

There seems to be no light at the end of the tunnel:

"I think that it is safe to say that no physician is optimistic about the future of medicine at this point," one participant wrote. Others seemed downright hopeless: "One thing that rarely gets mentioned is that, unlike other industries that are cyclical, the practice of medicine continually gets worse and worse, more intolerable, more onerous, with absolutely ...

Read more...

What's more, the patients know it as well:

Among patients who had recent visits to emergency departments, nearly half believed their health problems could have been handled in a doctor's office, the study said.

Many of the patients said they did not have alternatives, such as same-day appointments with a primary care physician, or evening and weekend appointments; nurse advice lines; or urgent care clinics.

"The survey results ...

Read more...

Extended hours are now "the new norm" in family medicine.

Kind of opposite of what happens here, where reimbursement continues to be cut. An an aside, $170/hr for an ER doc translates into over $350,000 per year assuming a 40-hour work week. Not sure what they're complaining about.

Sad story in an 18-year old diabetic who had to have one of her breasts removed.

Reaching a little far for a new revenue stream:

A hospital in Suffolk has been criticised for a fundraising plan to offer radiotherapy to family pets.

Ipswich Hospital proposes using equipment unused at weekends to treat pets with cancer in Saturday clinics.

The hospital aims to raise £50,000 a year from the idea to help pay off debts of more than £24m.

The Patients Association condemned ...

Read more...

Only 15 percent always checked the source. Scary considering the amount of quackery online.

Dr. Wes:

The issues of what we're doing to our immune systems is now coming into question, especially with the high prevalence of asthma in kids these days. We have known about "super bugs" like methicillin-resistant staph. aureus, or c. difficile. One wonders if we're selecting out these critters using antimicrobial products and alcohol-based gels.

Some tips on how to "survive" an ER visit:

The main culprit isn't incompetence but chaos: The nation's emergency rooms are overburdened and underfunded, treating ever more patients with ever fewer resources. "You don't want to scare the public, because hundreds of thousands of patients get cared for very well in emergency rooms every day," says Gail Warden, president emeritus of Michigan's Henry Ford Health System, who chaired a trio ...

Read more...

Separating who really needs narcotics:

This is honestly the most emotionally challenging thing I have dealt with as an ER doctor -- not as hard as having a child die on you, but more of an every-day sort of low-level emotional parasite. Some ER docs say "Why bother?" Give 'em what they want -- it's easier and everybody's happy." No complaints to administration that way, either. We euphemistically call ...

Read more...

Having returned from a major conference like Pri-Med, the pharmaceutical exhibits are always interesting. Essentially, they are engaged in a "top-this" competition of showmanship and extravagance to woo the physicians in attendance. This led to some comical scenes in this pharmaceutical wonderland.



So, how does one win a physician's attention?


Read more...

Scenes from Pri-Med

From the makers of Vioxx: "We try never to forget that medicine is for the people."



Your handwash, brought to you by Detrol LA



By far the most popular booth, Scarf King

Read more...

No source here, just something I heard over the weekend. A heads-up that the most physician-unfriendly insurer is up to its old tricks.

Most Popular