Instapundit talks about portable defibrillators and a recent Popular Mechanics story:

There's an article in the latest Popular Mechanics -- not on their website yet -- saying that the home defibrillators really do save lives. As they get cheaper and more ubiquitous, it's likely to make a real difference. A lot more people die from sudden cardiac death, where a defibrillator will save them but nothing else much will, ...

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Photo play-by-play of a failed peripheral IV placement.

Quite the impressive thumb.

Wither the ED doc? Here comes the "triple rule out" CT scan. "Chest pain represents one of the most common presenting symptoms in the emergency department, and it also represents a diagnostic challenge: Is it a pulmonary embolism? Is it an aortic dissection? Is it coronary artery disease? Or is it nothing?

Now, new CT technology promises to revolutionize this diagnosis, giving the ability to rule out all three ...

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SoundPractice.Net interviews GruntDoc in the medblogger podcast series.

Medpundit nicely summarizes the recent publicity surrounding Herceptin and breast cancer.

The obstacles behind the government's push for electronic health records. "Paying for the network will be the first major hurdle. Many cash-strapped hospitals and small-practice doctors have no interest in footing the bill for a medical Internet. One key reason is the mismatch between costs and savings: While health-care providers bear the cost of tech investments, Medicare and private insurers reap almost all the savings. Pamela R. Kushner, a family ...

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A gastroenterologist prescribes prayer for treatment. "To my surprise, the doctor came in and gave me not only his five minutes but also his five cents worth. And get this, he didn't even mention my temperamental entrails. Instead, he asked me about my backpack. No, not the literal one I had in college. But rather, the figurative one I've been carrying around ever since. In other words, he wanted to ...

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The partially blind neurosurgeon can no longer operate. "Despite limited eyesight, he completed residency in neurosurgery at the Medical College of Virginia, taught neurosurgery at two universities and earned certification from the American Board of Neurological Surgery. He practiced for many years in Arizona before moving to North Carolina eight years ago."

Another blow to Merck: Their potential blockbuster diabetes drug is showing some cardiac side effects. ""I expected the advisory panel to turn the drug down. When they didn't, I was really surprised. And so I now had a potential public health catastrophe in the waiting."

Coroners traded brains of mentally ill corpses to a private lab for profit. "Just a few days after her son Jim died unexpectedly, the King County Medical Examiner's office called, asking to take a sample of her son's brain. Instead, without permission, the county sent Jim's entire brain, plus his mental health and medical history files to the Stanley Medical Institute in Bethesda Maryland." (via FARK.com)

Bizarre non-medical news of the week: The "chicken choking" toy is coming under fire.



"A product description on the Web site of Jaycar Electronics, a major Australian importer of toy, says: 'Grab him by the neck and he will squawk and cluck like mad, flapping his wings and feet wildly as if he is really being choked.'

But Michael Beatty, a spokesman for the Queensland state ...

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This radiologist wants more stringent controls on ordering radiology tests. "Unfortunately, well over 10 years of a 'just say yes' philosophy applied, not just in a clinical realm, but in academic realms, is now paying off with grave and dire consequences. While 'just say yes' is an effective means of expediting and efficiently obtaining imaging studies for patients, this works when the referring physician is an adequately and competently trained ...

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A widow in the UK wants the sue the hospital after her husband contracted MRSA.

A study found black women with chronic pain were more likely to be physically impaired by their pain.

Wisconsin is trying to reinstate malpractice caps. "Republican lawmakers are pushing for fast passage of the new caps, which supporters claim will survive a court test. Without legislation, Wisconsin physicians' malpractice insurance premiums will go up so high that doctors will be discouraged from practicing in the state, business and health care leaders have warned."

"Your daughter is dead, I'm sorry, but she has no blood pressure." Two mistakes here: 1) This was said in a crowded waiting room to the mother; 2) The daughter was not dead.

A pediatrician mysteriously leaves. Is malpractice insurance to blame?

On October 4th, I was told by Dr. Mardolkar that the malpractice insurance was due on October 1st, and that he could not make the payment.

An internist talks about his time in New Orleans.

A man posed as a pediatric heart surgeon to pick up women. "One hospital employee, who didn't want to be identified, said she watched West review patient records and discuss treatments with nurses and other doctors."