Perverse results of changing the qualifying BMI from 35 to 45:

Obese people are gorging themselves in order to qualify for stomach-stapling surgery on the NHS.

Overweight patients are being forced to pile on the pounds after trusts raised the level of obesity they must reach to get the treatment, a patients' association claimed yesterday . . .

. . . Yesterday one man who has ...

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Guess how much this visit is reimbursed, in this scenario of newly-diagnosed breast cancer:

That's where my office gets involved. Five or ten faxed pages arrive on my assistant's desk. She calls the Gynecologist's office to request additional material, including copies of the mammogram report, the patient's contact information and insurance data-if the patient is insured.

As it happens, like more than 60% of the women I ...

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Surgeon-blogger Bard-Parker speculates.

Caffeinated donuts

I'm glad this molecular scientist put his energy into this important discovery:

That's what Doctor Robert Bohannon, a Durham, North Carolina, molecular scientist, has come up with. Bohannon says he's developed a way to add caffeine to baked goods, without the bitter taste of caffeine. Each piece of pastry is the equivalent of about two cups of coffee.

Amazing.

KipEsquire:

A key premise in any call for socialized medicine is that physicians (and nurses and dentists and physical therapists and orderlies and equipment technicians and pharmacists and ...) will continue to do what they do now, as much as they do it now (and where they do it now and as well as they do it now and for as long as they do it now and ...) despite ...

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Gates: "If the pharmaceutical industry developed and promoted drugs like Microsoft develops and promotes software, we would all be paying only $25 a year for all the drugs we need."

Pharma: "Yeah, and if drugs were like software that Microsoft develops and promotes, they would stop working for no reason, and when you tried to get a different brand, there wouldn't be any."

(via Pharma Marketing Blog)

Her question: "Based on your own family's experience, what do you think we should do to improve health care in America?"

After two days, there are 35,000 responses. (via Graham)

This is the fundamental philosophical difference between what I (and others) believe and the stance of the single-payer supporters. Thanks GruntDoc for linking to the money quote:

As with any good or service that is provided by some specific group of men, if you try to make its possession by all a right, you thereby enslave the providers of the service, wreck the service, and end ...

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Medicaid + Clomid

The always entertaining Angry Pharmacist with his take:

I personally would of called up the doctors office and asked them why they were writing a fertility drug to a patient that obviously could not take care of her self, but for some reason thought that bringing a child into the world would magically make her problems go away. What kind of dip**** retarded doctor would write for this? Oh, one ...

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He was to take a flight to see specialists at UCSF. His ascites led him over the weight limit for a single seat. The airline wouldn't let him board without buying another seat.

One great condom ad

She used misoprostol, typically used for ulcers, but also used for illegal abortions in the Dominican Republic. (via OnthePharm)

Wondering whether malpractice caps work?

Neurosurgery malpractice premiums LA/Orange County: $83,000.

Contrast that to Miami: $349,000.

Just ask residents in Hawaii where physician access is at a premium.

A recent study from the Journal of Urology regrading this previously unpublicized side effect:

Men who have hormone and radiation therapy for prostate cancer can experience penile shortening, a study has suggested.

Turkish researchers studied 47 men who were receiving the treatments, the Journal of Urology reported.

Eighteen months later the researchers assessed the men again, and found a decrease in average stretched penile length from 14.2 ...

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Pretty sneaky:

No doubt you saw this article in the Washington Post describing the efforts of PharmedOut to make no-cost, continuing medical education sessions available to physicians. As pharmaceutical companies sponsor a large proportion of CME sessions for physicians, the ostensible purpose of PharmedOut's campaign lies in removing Pharma's undue influence on prescribing behavior.

It seems PharmedOut.org was created through a $21 million grant from Warner-Lambert (now Pfizer). ...

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A touching entry about not wanting to die:

Nowadays, no matter how much I try to put off decisions until later, I must admit that everything seems to bother me. For example, my writing bothers me, because I have to be careful to be legible, even to myself. I am quite sure I have had a stroke (the final medical diagnosis is still pending), a small one I suppose, ...

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You're out of luck, if you live in Washington state. (via GruntDoc)

Originally titled "Monster Love", it's causing an uproar in the Netherlands:

"Do you have a visible serious handicap and are you looking for a partner?" says an appeal on its Web site.

"The program is a platform for people with such problems to share experiences and feelings in a positive way with the rest of the Netherlands and to show that they are absolutely not pitiful," the broadcaster said.

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