by Kristina Fiore Websites that encourage teens to continue in their eating disorders tend to do so via "thinspiration" -- a combination of images and prose that drive the viewer toward continued weight loss, researchers say. About 85% of these sites provide thinspirational photos (or "thinspo") of ultrathin women and oaths to "Ana" or "Mia" -- nicknames for anorexia and bulemia -- according to Dina L.G. Borzekowski, EdD, of Johns Hopkins, and ...

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My friend and colleague Katherine Chretien has a provocative op-ed in USA Today entitled, "A doctor's request: Please don't 'friend' me," which asks the question whether doctors and patients should interact in social networking sites such as Facebook. Social networking has huge potential in health care regarding the sharing of information and ideas, and could possibly even enhance communication between doctors and patients. However, as Dr. Chretien points out, many ...

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In May, I spoke at the Chronic Care and Prevention Congress about my most recent report, “Chronic Disease and the Internet.” I talked about the social life of health information and the internet’s power to connect people with information and with each other.  Living with chronic disease is associated with being offline – no surprise. What’s amazing and new is our finding that if someone can get access to the ...

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by Cole Petrochko Last week, I was sick, the kind of sick where you're not well enough to leave the house and be productive, but not sick enough to successfully sniffle in bed and subsist entirely on chicken soup and the wishes of family. My existence during that time could have been summarized as, "Periodic bouts of achy consciousness followed by extended fever dreams about King of the Hill characters." Most of ...

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Dave Weigel was formerly a blogger at the Washington Post who covered conservative politics. He was ousted from his position after incendiary statements made on Journolist, a left-leaning listserv maintained by the liberal blogger at the Post, Ezra Klein. Journolist is no more, but there's fallout from this episode that physicians should be wary about. Jeffrey Parks first made the connection about a similar, closed community that physicians participate in. Namely, ...

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In Boston we took the availability and quality of our tap water for granted until May 1, 2010, when a major water pipe break interrupted water service to two million Greater Boston residents. Information spread quickly to citizens about the problem and what to do, all the more notable because the water main break occurred on a Saturday. In this age of consumer paranoia about withheld information, the Massachusetts Water Resources ...

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“I would be careful,” a fellow physician cautioned, as I told of my plans to attend a patient’s birthday party. In my 12 years of clinical practice I have lived in the community in which I practice, less than two miles from my office. I encounter patients daily in the supermarket, at soccer games, swim meets and school events. I have had conversations with patients at parties, on the street, and ...

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Should you friend your doctor on Facebook? It's a question that's gaining increasing relevance as Facebook increases its social networking dominance. I've touched upon the issue in the past. So has the New England Journal of Medicine. Washington, DC physician Katherine Chretian gives her take on the issue in a recent USA Today op-ed. She is an expert of the Facebook-medicine intersection, having authored a JAMA study on the ...

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I'd like to thank various media outlets for recently citing KevinMD.com. ABC News: How long will you wait to see a doctor?

While coverage is expected to extend to between 31 and 35 million Americans without insurance currently, a shortage of primary care doctors may mean extended wait times to actually see a doctor -- if new patients can get in at all ... ... "That situation, extrapolated to the rest of ...

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by Ryan DuBosar “House, M.D.,” is the least realistic medical drama on television. That doesn’t bother Lisa Sanders, ACP Member, one of the show’s technical advisors. The lead character, Gregory House, MD, verbally abuses patients, goes overboard ordering tests and above all, he’s “a jerk,” Dr. Sanders said. But after all, it’s television, and the former CBS news producer turned med student turned Yale professor understands the difference between reality and good ...

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