I'm back from my whirlwind trip to Las Vegas, and I want to think those who followed our panel at BlogWorld 2010. I was joined by Bryan Vartabedian of 33 Charts, and Kerri Morrone Sparling of six until me in a panel moderated by Kim McAllister of Emergiblog. A few thoughts from my end.
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Wendy Sue Swanson, also known as Seattle Mama Doc, is a pediatrician in Seattle who recently gave a keynote at the Swedish Medical Center as part of their 2010 Health Care Symposium. I was following it on Twitter, where it received rave reviews. The video is now up, and the accolades were truly well deserved. A gifted speaker, Dr. Swanson's presentation should be required viewing for physicians and ...

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If you’re a health care professional, chances are you know a bit about social media, possibly feel compelled to use it sometimes and you might actually be participating in the Facebook/Twitter/LinkedIn/blog revolution. But there can be real problems in using social media in the health care context. Whether you are in private practice or work for a group of large hospital network, social media mistakes can be costly in terms of ...

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Some people are disappointed at the latest FDA notice to Novartis over a Facebook button on one of their website pages. The key question that a lot of people fail to ask is “do patients want to have a conversation with a drug company?”  From almost one year of qualitative and quantitative research plus other 3rd party research (i.e. Rodale DTC Study) the answer to that is “no.” Now before you get ...

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Speaking to the senior staff of the National Library of Medicine recently was like going before the best kind of murder board. Picture it: 30 of the nation’s smartest health information mavens around a polished conference room table, asking me sharp questions, suggesting new lines of inquiry, and offering their own insights. In other words, heaven. Our jumping-off point was the Pew Internet Project’s latest research on internet penetration, mobile use, and ...

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by Walter van den Broek, MD, PhD Do Facebook and other social networking services damage the profession of physicians or the public trust in this profession? So far, no systematic research into this topic has been published. However several cases were presented in the media resulting in disciplinary measures. On social networking sites patients may learn information about their doctors that compromises the professional relationship. Threats to ...

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I recently wrote about the hidden dangers of physician social networks, and how private posts can potentially become public at a later date. With the recent controversy surrounding former Washington Post blogger Dave Weigel and Journalist in mind, I commented that,

passionate, controversial debate is frequent on Sermo, along with discussion of patient cases. Part of what makes the site so provocative and insightful is the fact that the conversations ...

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As more students participate in social media, like Twitter, Facebook, and blogs, Bryan Vartabedian asks, "Does Twitter Belong on Your Medical School Application?" Great question. I'd say that the majority of doctors and medical schools fail to see the utility of social media, and are generally behind the curve.  Indeed, as Dr. Vartabedian writes, "some academics, after all, see social media as a waste of time." But that's going to change.  With ...

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Email, Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, YouTube, Delicious, Digg, LinkedIn, blogs (of course), and scores of others—all part of the new and wonderful ways we can now connect with one another electronically, each with its own culture and unique set of rules. In one sense, the planet has never been more interconnected. And yet, this interconnectedness, while wonderful, hasn’t come without cost. Isolation Much has been written about the dangers of Internet addiction. From pornography ...

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by Kristina Fiore Websites that encourage teens to continue in their eating disorders tend to do so via "thinspiration" -- a combination of images and prose that drive the viewer toward continued weight loss, researchers say. About 85% of these sites provide thinspirational photos (or "thinspo") of ultrathin women and oaths to "Ana" or "Mia" -- nicknames for anorexia and bulemia -- according to Dina L.G. Borzekowski, EdD, of Johns Hopkins, and ...

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