There has been a significant outcry against the proposed ACO regulations: everything's wrong and nothing's right about them, or so some would have us believe. Today's "nattering nabobs of negativism" focus on: the estimated price tag for complying with the regulatory requirements (IT and other infrastructure incuded), the slim chance of success by ACOs in righting the wrongs of decades of bloat in the health care system, ...

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"Doctors, with the consent of their patients, should be free to provide whatever care they agree is appropriate. But when the procedure arising from that judgment, however well intentioned, is not supported by evidence, the nation’s taxpayers should have no obligation to pay for it." So argues Dr. Rita Redberg, a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of California, in a provocative op-ed published in the New ...

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It's pretty simple, really. Once people gain actual real-life experience with a government program, they abandon their fear of the unknown, see its benefits more clearly, and become invested in its future. We've seen that with Medicare, which consistently pleases its beneficiaries. Part D has similar traction, and now we've learned that the citizens of Massachusetts are increasingly happy with that state's health reform. I'm not arguing that Massachusetts, Part D or even ...

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An excerpt from Balancing The Budget is a Progressive Priority. It is our cultural fear of death and inability to discuss the limits of medicine to forestall death that enables the politics of health reform to be so potent. When I did a post-doctoral fellowship in England in the mid-1990s, a professor I met who had lived in the U.S. explained to me why he thought health policy discussions in that nation ...

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Major journals have slipped in another article that apparently was designed for controversy and for widespread distribution to media outlets. The New York Times rapidly picked it up. As the nation enters the final months before 29.5% fee cuts for Medicare physician services, there will be many more of these that reach the light of day - too many if this is an indication. What is common to major journals, media ...

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The realization that the American health care system must simultaneously decrease per-capita cost and increase quality has created the opportunity for the United States to learn from low and middle-income countries. "Reverse innovation" describes the process whereby an inexpensive innovation is used first in countries with limited infrastructure and resources and then spreads to industrialized nations like the United States. The traditional model of innovation has involved the creation of ...

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A guest column by the American Medical Association, exclusive to KevinMD.com. Every year since 2001 the threat of severe physician payment cuts, imposed by Medicare’s failed sustainable growth rate formula (SGR), have jeopardized the stability of the Medicare system and compromised access to care for patients. And every year – sometimes several times a year – Congress has put in place short-term ...

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The current reorganization of health care could make it better and cheaper for everyone, harnessing real creative and competitive energies to build the "next health care" —or it could lead to local monopolies, higher prices and less real competition where it matters. The many and various moves toward accountability, competition and transparency could defeat themselves. The theme of the reorganization is clear: new types of cooperation between physicians, hospitals and other ...

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A guest column by the American College of Physicians, exclusive to KevinMD.com. In April 2011 I finished seven years on the Board of Regents of the American College of Physicians (ACP) including two years as Chair of the ACP Health and Public Policy Committee and serving during the last year as President. During that time I had the opportunity to ...

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In the September 2011 issue of Harvard Business Review, Harvard Business School professors Robert Kaplan and Michael Porter argue that a better understanding of the actual cost of care patient-by-patient can have a dramatic impact in the effort to control health care costs. They maintain that actual costs are poorly understood, that there is a mistaken belief that many costs are too complex to allocate accurately, and that ...

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