The two party’s approaches are quite different.  Politicians realize that Medicare will not be able to continue on its current track. Something has to change since the country will simply not be able to afford the inexorable growth and expenditures. But politicians do not like to take away entitlements so proposals generally are couched in vague terms and often with positions that are unrealistic. The Democrats’ plans are contained generally in ...

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More than 40 years ago as a third year medical student, I recall the Chief of Medicine praising a fellow student for his rare diagnosis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in a patient who had presented with the common symptom of “painless hematuria.” The lesson was not lost on any of us: good medicine means an expansive differential diagnosis and an even longer list of tests (including expensive ones) to “rule them ...

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There was an interesting and important article in the New York Times the other day about the gradual increase in the average E/M coding levels used by doctors over the last few years. For the non-docs, med students and ER trainees out there, here is a brief summary of the way physician billing works in the ER. During and after the patient encounter, the physician creates a medical record. ...

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A guest column by the American Medical Association, exclusive to KevinMD.com. As our nation’s health care system undergoes historic reforms, the American Medical Association (AMA) has embarked on a long-term strategic plan that seeks a better future for medicine – both for the physicians who make it their profession and the patients who count on us for care. Our focus ...

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Since the nomination of Congressman Paul Ryan as the vice presidential candidate of the Republican Party, Medicare has become front and center in the political discussions. To understand the dialogue requires an understanding of Medicare, how it works, where the money comes from, how it is spent and why there is such concern for its future costs. Here is an overview. Medicare was designed in 1965 to serve as “major medical” ...

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Emergency Physicians Monthly has an important debate between ACEP President David Seaberg and EP Monthly founder Mark Plaster about the “Choosing Wisely” program. Choosing Wisely is being pushed by the ABIM Foundation as a way to get specialty societies to label certain tests as “unnecessary” or of questionable benefit. I side with Dr. Seaberg in this argument. I disagree with the concept some people advance that we ...

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Republicans and Democrats don’t agree on much about Medicare, except for getting rid of the fee-for-service system for paying doctors. “If reducing the growth of Medicare spending to sustainable rates and moving away from fee-for-service are ‘ending Medicare as we know it,’ then both parties have embraced that goal, writes former OMB Budget Director Alice Rivlin in a Daily Beast commentary. “Paying providers on a fee-for-service basis offers incentives to ...

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The gynecologist made several incisions and inserted the laparoscope. With the help of her surgical team of nurses, students and anesthesiologists, she removed the patient’s uterus, which had been bleeding uncontrollably for the past six months despite aggressive medical therapy. The price tag of the procedure? Around $6,000. Meanwhile in a nearby hospital, another gynecologist removes another woman’s uterus, in a procedure no more complicated or time consuming than the first ...

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Atul Gawande, MD, is a technophile and a believer in the checklist, and he yokes these ideologies to an attractive metaphor in his newest essay for the New Yorker. The article is worth reading in its entirety, but it can be easily paraphrased. The Cheescake Factory, like other successful restaurant chains, has "brought chain production to complicated sit-down meals." They've done it by far-reaching standardization of the best possible ...

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Recently, I discovered the statewide report on quality of stroke care in Massachusetts.  It’s a plain document, mostly in black and white, much of what you might expect from a state government report.  Yet, this 4-page document is a reminder of how we have come to accept mediocrity as the standard in our healthcare delivery system. The report is about 1,082 men and women in Massachusetts unfortunate enough to have ...

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