We recently had a readmission -- a straightforward case, really.  Mr. Jones, a 64-year-old homeless veteran, intermittently took his diabetes medications and would often run out.  He had recently been discharged from our hospital (a VA hospital) after admission for hyperglycemia.  The discharging team had been meticulous in their care.  At the time of discharge, they had simplified his medication regimen, called him at his shelter to check in a few ...

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On September 28, 1864, the first meeting of the International Workingmen’s Association (IWA) was convened at St. Martin’s Hall, London.  Among the attendees was a relatively obscure German journalist by the name of Karl Marx.  Though Marx did not speak during the meeting, he soon began playing a crucial role in the life of the organization, in part because he was assigned the task of drafting its founding documents. The work ...

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Primary care is essential to building a higher-performing health care system that promotes personal well-being and saves consumers and taxpayers money. Research shows that more primary care physicians in a community means lower rates of mortality, better preventive care, and fewer hospitalizations and emergency room visits. Unfortunately, too many Americans lack easy access to primary care.  Approximately 50 million Americans live in areas, mostly rural, with too few primary care physicians. ...

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How to improve doctor administrator relations A colleague at a hospital-based health system recently told me about physician alignment initiatives his employer was introducing. These included co-management deals (where doctors get per patient incentives for on-time discharges, and high quality scores) and new salary models that adjusted based on various metrics. At the same time, he noted, his hospital was laying off clerks, leaving him spending hours on clerical tasks ...

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I have written a couple of pieces documenting the high percentage of physicians who refuse to take Medicaid patients, and some of the reasons for their refusal. One of my pieces prompted a physician to email me with his take on this matter. I am going to quote from that email, but take out identifying information to protect his anonymity. Here’s what he ...

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Part of a series. Comprehensive primary care for employees means better employee health, greater productivity, less presenteesism and lower costs for both employee and employer. That is why some companies are making health care a strategic imperative rather than just a tactic as part of human resource cost management. Some are developing full service enhanced primary care clinics on site with excellent success as described in my last ...

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Every year, ambitious students from around the world flock to America’s leading business schools, hoping to learn how to create new ventures that can change the world. On the West Coast, situated in the heart of Silicon Valley, Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business attracts budding entrepreneurs with challenging and practical programs. Courses like “Entrepreneurship: Formation of New Ventures” and “Managing Growing Enterprises” encourage students to develop innovative business models that solve real ...

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When I was in high school, a national hardware retailer opened a new franchise down the street from the mom-and-pop hardware store that had served my neighborhood for many years. Since the new store had the advantage of larger volumes and lower costs, it seemed to be only a matter of time before it drove its smaller competitor out of business, the way that big bookstore chains and fast-food restaurants ...

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Around the country, doctors are leaving independent practice and joining large groups owned by health care systems. It’s a trend: the recruiting firm Merritt Hawkins predicts that if current growth continues, over 75% of newly hired physicians will be hospital employees within two years. There seem to be a number of reasons for this consolidation of physicians and hospitals into islands of care. One is the desire for larger groups to have ...

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American health care has become a gigantic game board with players of all sorts strategizing to win. Winning, of course, means getting more money from payers: government or private. It turns out this medical marketplace game is not all that new. It's just become wilier, as I have shared in a couple of posts over the summer. An obituary last week for Dr. Rashi Fein, an influential economist with a progressive stripe ...

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