As of September 2, CVS -- the ubiquitous pharmacy/convenience store -- has stopped selling tobacco products, including both cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. This is a bold move from the retailer, which is also planning to rebrand itself as “CVS Health” to emphasize its place in the health care delivery chain. I personally applaud the decision, because there are simply no benefits to tobacco use in any form. And it’s also ...

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Bottom up: How grassroots input shapes ACP policies A guest column by the American College of Physicians, exclusive to KevinMD.com. This month, the American College of Physicians’ Board of Governors (BOG) will meet in Chicago. One of the items on the agenda is the discussion of resolutions that will help to shape ACP policy. The resolutions process, which looks at proposed policy changes and directives to ...

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I came across an interesting article in the New Yorker last week: "Why Chinese patients are turning against their doctors." It is a fascinating account of the evolution of the health care system in China, highlighting the major changes that have led to increased patient-doctor homicides. In a nutshell, in ancient China, traditional medicine reigned king, and people scoffed at the idea of Westernized medicine. This started changing in 1949 ...

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Part of a series. Helping employees improve their health is right for the company’s bottom line and is doing right by our employees.  Healthier employees are happier, demonstrate less absenteeism and presenteesism, and are more productive.  This is a win for everyone involved.   - John Torinus, Jr., a retired CEO and current board chair of Serigraph, Inc., a mid-sized Wisconsin company with about 500 employees In my earlier posts in this series ...

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A recent report from the Commonwealth Fund, which placed U.S. last amongst developing nations in health care, analyzed Britain’s high score on the management of chronic conditions. The authors attributed care coordination to the widespread adoption of health information technology in the National Health Service (NHS). That’s like someone saying Chinese food is tasty because chopsticks are widely used. Like quants so fastidious about decimal points they’ve missed the overall point. Where do ...

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The study you never heard of: Small practices arent dead yet According to a new Commonwealth Fund sponsored study published in Health Affairs, “Small Primary Care Physician Practices Have Low Rates Of Preventable Hospital Admissions.” The study of over one thousand practices of various sizes and ownerships, conducted by some of the most respected names in health care, found that the smallest independent primary care practices, that are physician owned, provide ...

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Hospitals should not control the decisions of pregnant women Doctors, hospitals and judges have over the years attempted to control the decisions of pregnant women. In a recent Florida case, it’s not clear whether the controllers sought to protect the fetus, the woman or both. They may have wanted to protect the hospital from potential liability. The case involved a 39-week-pregnant woman. According to a Read more...

One of my main interests in primary care is providing care to all people, regardless of their income or ability to pay. In my limited experience with health care, I have found it most rewarding to work with the underserved and underprivileged, those who do not have their own money available to allocate to health care. These patients are on Medicaid or are at the mercy of free clinics. This is why I ...

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That the government overpays sellers of Medicare Advantage plans is well known in Beltway circles even if much of the public remains unaware. Recently, two Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) researchers posted new findings on the Medicare and Medicaid Research Review, a peer-reviewed online journal supported by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), documenting how some insurance companies are overbilling the government and have been doing so ...

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The recent disagreement between Uwe Reinhardt and Sally Pipes in Forbes is a teachable moment. There’s a dearth of confrontational debates in health policy, and education is worse off for it. Crux of the issue is the more efficient system: employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) or Medicaid. Sally Pipes, president of the market-leaning Pacific Research Institute, believes it is ESI. Employers spend 60% less than the government, per person: $3,430 versus $9,130, ...

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