Health behavior change is hard; if it were easy, everyone would be doing it. But running a marathon is also hard, and lately it seems that just about everyone is doing it. The health care industry could learn a lot from the increasing popularity of the marathon about how to design programs that help people make positive health behavior changes. At its core, running 26.2 miles has much in common with the process ...

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As the VA scandal unfolds, with continued revelations of secret waitlists and delayed or denied medical care, calls have been building Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki to resign. He did just that, resigning because, “He had become a distraction as the department struggles.” President Obama, eager to show America that he was being proactive about the scandal, regretfully accepted the General’s resignation. But other than allowing the president to show that he is doing something about ...

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Mental health patients and their families already pay a hefty price with the stigma of mental illness and the emotional roller coaster they often face dealing with symptoms. But insufficient mental health resources across the United States also means that they must pay a financial price as well in the form of lost productivity, out-of-pocket costs for treatment and sometimes periods of unemployment. A recent USA Today special report estimates that benefits ...

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There are over 16,000,000 American children (21.8%) who live in official poverty and double that number who are just poor. This is not happening in an obscure country, in a continent far away. It is happening right here, across the street from you. For those enjoying a good episode of Duck Dynasty, these are not children of illegal immigrants, and the vast majority is white kids. Over 44,000,000 American children (more ...

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Conflicting state versus federal incentives confuse doctors I get paid by Medicaid to see patients. How much? Exactly $52.28 if it is an easy patient issue, like a cold, and $78.54 for a harder one, like a kidney stone. Who decides when the issue is easy and when it is hard? I do. But I have to follow some complex rules when deciding whether to bill a 99213 ...

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Opening my mail today, there are multiple letters from multiple insurance companies, reportedly communicating valuable information to me about my panel of patients that they cover. One of the envelopes holds two single sheets of paper, one of which contains a listing of my panel of patients and the providers they have been referred to over the past quarter. The second sheet, mysteriously, contains only a single line: This page intentionally left ...

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The California ballot initiative: Protecting patients or letting in a Trojan horse?A guest column by the American College of Physicians, exclusive to KevinMD.com. Physicians in California are mobilizing to oppose an initiative on the November ballot that will raise the cap on non-economic damages in medical malpractice cases. The current cap of $250,000 is part of California’s Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act, or MICRA. Adopted in ...

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It may not be long before a hospital will be the least likely place to find a doctor. Pressures are mounting to replace physicians with computers, guidelines, nurse practitioners and even pharmacists. The assault on the patient-doctor relationship continues to mount. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently made a final ruling that finds the regulation requiring a doctor sit on the governing board of a hospital to be “unnecessary, obsolete, ...

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The U.S. spends nearly $3 trillion a year on health care, significantly more than any other nation. In fact, America’s annual health care spending is greater than the total gross domestic product (GDP) of every other country except China, Germany and Japan. Yet our measurable health outcomes -- from infant mortality to life expectancy -- aren’t any better than nations spending much less. I’ve written about this paradox before, pointing to a few ...

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We all want the advantage.  We put our kids in special preschools so they have the advantage.  We work 100 hours a week so our kids can do 8 activities and get the advantage. Tall people have an advantage, we’re told.  Poor people are “disadvantaged.” Well folks, there are a whole bunch of senior citizens in Massachusetts who are about to get disadvantaged starting September 1. UnitedHealthcare (UHC) will be
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