A family physician chronicles his journey from an HMO to urgent care to practicing outside of the insurance system.

Steve Simmons notes that doctors out of residency rarely have any training in the business of medicine, including the all-important skill of coding.

"I needed to learn this'skill' on the fly," observes Dr. Simmons, "using a code book to translate each medical diagnosis into a five digit number, ...

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The furor over the California octuplet case refuses to die.

Attention has recently been focused on her doctor, one Michael Kamrava. MedPage Today cites a LA Times story, shedding more light on the physician and his Beverly Hills practice.

In addition to the Suleman case, another one of his patients his currently hospitalized with quadruplets. Apparently, in reproductive medicine, any result greater than twins is ...

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And if you don't, does it really matter?

Bob Wachter discusses a recent study concluding that very few could actually name their hospitalist one month after an admission.

Ideally, "patients need to have a personal connection to their physicians, particularly at times of great need and uncertainty," writes Dr. Wachter.

I agree, but the health system has incentives geared towards giving more disjointed, fractionated care. Hospitalists ...

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Lawyers and left-leaning policy wonks often discount how pervasive defensive medicine is.

WhiteCoat, an emergency physician, is almost convinced by those who call defensive medicine a figment of the medical profession's imagination.

Then he starts his shift working in the emergency department, an experience that most lawyers and policy experts do not have by the way, and cites specific examples where he made a decision specifically to thwart ...

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What is it like to be sued for malpractice?

Although many say "every physician gets sued," and, "never to talk about it," how does it affect doctors?

As I've written before, being sued for malpractice is a traumatically scarring experience. So much that up to 10 percent of doctors in this situation contemplated suicide.

George Hossfeld writes about his malpractice ordeal (via Dr. RW) ...

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Hospitalist medicine is the fastest growing medical specialty in history.

Will they having staying power? This piece (via Dr. RW) describes how doctors in the 60's and 70's didn't want to practice in the emergency department, leading to the birth of emergency medicine specialists.

The same is happening now, as primary care doctors are loathe to practice in the hospital. This is even spreading to general ...

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Apologizing after medical errors is the moral and ethical thing to do, but this attorney says otherwise.

Saying sorry can deny malpractice coverage, says attorney Steven Kern, and from a legal perspective, "saying I'm sorry is an admission. An admission is an exception to the hearsay rule, so anyone who hears it can be called to testify against you, should legal action ensue."

What about the 35 states ...

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I've wrote an op-ed in the USA Today this past April about how defensive medicine wastes medical dollars.

Today, the editorial staff takes on the issue themselves, with a fierce piece decrying the current malpractice system as "arbitrary, inefficient and results in years of delay."

The recent Massachusetts Medical Society's study on defensive medicine was prominently included, as it was reported that "83% of its doctors practice ...

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The malpractice cap that Texas instituted in 2003 is leading to an influx of doctors.

That's good for patients who benefit from the access provided by the new physicians. However, the Texas Medical Board can't keep up with the pace of new registrations, despite increasing their staff by 28 percent over the last six years.

This is leading to a delay when dealing with patient complaints, which ...

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Plaintiff attorneys receive contingency fees only in a successful outcome, or if the suit is settled out of court.

That's why it's important for lawyers to be discerning as to which cases to accept. "Big ticket" cases like "bad babies, paraplegia, and death of a wage-earner" often have influence.

Here are other factors that attorneys consider, including "the sympathy value of the plaintiff, the credibility of ...

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