Although every day can bring surprises in a medical practice, you can develop a clinical team that can optimize the efficiencies of your operation and make it easier for you to see your patients. There are three key areas that lead to provider frustration in daily operations: preparation and anticipation; the daily dance; and being in the moment. Address these, and your days should go more smoothly. Preparation and anticipation Are your charts ...

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I have spent most of the past 2 weeks on the road – first at ACP and this week at SGIM. I have talked with many internists, but several conversations have contributed to writing this post. Each of several leaders contributed to these ideas, but I will keep them anonymous so the innocent are protected. Here are the main assumptions: 1. Internists by training excel in the care of complexity 2. Pursuing the ...

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There's been a lot of commentary on a recent article from the New England Journal of Medicine, detailing the undocumented tasks that a typical primary care physician performs. For those who haven't read the piece, entitled, What's Keeping Us So Busy in Primary Care? A Snapshot from One Practice, it's available free at the NEJM website. I highly recommend it. To summarize, primary care doctors are responsible for much more ...

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A guest column by the American Board of Internal Medicine, exclusive to KevinMD.com. Imagine a sub-par doctor at a vibrant health system with care delivered and coordinated by skilled teams, using robust EHRs and other vital supports for physicians and patients. Now imagine an extremely talented, knowledgeable doctor at an underfunded community clinic. This clinic has no real computer system, ...

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by John Gever Up to one-third of children with febrile bacterial infections failed to receive antibiotics in a large emergency department, while 20% of youngsters without such infections received antibiotics unnecessarily, Australian researchers said. A computer algorithm based on standard test results could do a better job of assigning feverish children to the correct treatment sooner, Jonathan C. Craig, MBChB, PhD, of the University of Sydney, and colleagues reported online in BMJ. Although ...

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One of the biggest emergency room problems is contacting patients after they leave. Patients sometimes leave false contact information -- which makes it difficult for the emergency room staff should problems arise after the visit. The issue was illustrated in a piece from msnbc.com. Many times, results like blood cultures or x-ray findings take time to return. And if there's something that needs to be acted upon, contacting the ...

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An excerpt from How to Survive a Medical Malpractice Lawsuit: The Physician's Roadmap for Success. by Ilene R. Brenner, MD The most important part of your case is upon you: the pretrial deposition. If you do a poor job, you can ruin your case and make a defensible lawsuit become indefensible. So what is a deposition? It is the sworn testimony of a witness taken before trial, in a location ...

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by Chris Emery Acne patients who received online treatment from dermatologists had similar outcomes to patients who were treated in the doctor's office, a new study found. Patients who participated in "e-visits" with dermatologists experienced similar reductions in inflammatory lesions as those who had office visits, Alice J. Watson, MBChB, MRCP, MPH, of the Center for Connected Health in Boston, and colleagues wrote in the report, published online April 19 in the ...

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I speak with many physicians who are interested in leaving clinical medicine to pursue an alternative career (non-clinical job) and they always seem to ask the same types of questions. Let's dig into some of those "Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)" by exploring some common questions that are rooted in myths and misconceptions. Here are some questions that I get all the time from physicians who are considering a career transition: 1. How ...

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Last week my wife and best friend, Elaine, had massive abdominal surgery. We fully expected her to be an inpatient for a week, but she was home in four and half days. To watch her recover was to see what happens when everything converges: the deep knowledge and skills of excellent, humane physicians; a capable, caring clinical staff; wonderful new technologies; and a lifetime of eating right, being fit and ...

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