A resident once offered me this piece of advice: Find mentors whom you admire. Not just for their rapport with patients, but also for their lifestyle, their hours and their family life. Make goals that you know to be realistic because someone has already accomplished them. My question now: Why stop there? Why not share that ounce of brilliant advice with our patients? Why don’t we link older, successful patients with diabetes ...

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Solving the mid level dilemma: Call them what they really are Dr. Michael Pappas hates it when a nurse practitioner is called a mid-level provider: "Stop calling nurse practitioners mid-level providers." So do I, though my reasons are a bit different.  In order to understand them it will be necessary to revisit those dark ages, a time when such individuals were few and the roles played in the drama we know ...

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"If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?" Chances are that many of you have duked this out with your college roommates back in the day, but how about this one? “If a doctor and a patient make an advance care plan, but when an emergency happens, nobody can find a copy of it, the proxy doesn't know what's ...

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Several months ago, a post called, "Everything's my fault: How a surgeon says I'm sorry," appeared here on KevinMD.com. It was written by a plastic surgeon who feels that no matter goes wrong with a patient, surgeons should never blame anyone else. She gave some examples such as the lab losing a specimen, a chest x-ray that was ordered and not done, a patient eating something when he was not to ...

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Part of a series. A common criticism of direct primary care (DPC, membership/retainer/concierge practices) is the added expense: “Isn’t it too expensive?” Ways to think about the cost are to prioritize expenditures and to consider potential savings that make it cost effective. I gave examples of three direct primary care practices in an earlier post. Here is a recap of costs. AtlasMD’s annual fee is $600 for a young adult and ...

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A few weeks ago, my husband and I took my parents to dinner at one of my favorite restaurants. I was excited to go because the food is excellent and the customer service is top notch. In the past, I’d always had a great experience ... until then. That night, the restaurant was packed as they were offering half-priced desserts. My husband and I arrived first. I noticed when we ordered ...

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Direct primary care (DPC) and concierge medicine are rapidly growing models of primary care. Though the terms are used interchangeably, both are not the same. Such liberal use of terms, many times by even those within the industry, confuses those who are attempting to understand how these primary care models operate. As former concierge physician for the Pebble Beach Resorts, and subsequent founder of one of the nation’s largest direct ...

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I wholeheartedly support the message behind the project, What Works For Me. As health care professionals, we continually encounter human suffering and work under stressful conditions. As a family physician for the past 14 years, I have been fortunate enough to work in a variety of clinical settings, including several in general family practice. Currently, I practice family medicine in the sexual health clinic of a community health center. ...

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The big day has finally arrived. Your boss shakes your hand and wishes you well. Your colleagues gather around a cake and make small talk about landing the big fish in your retirement, or joke about what you’ll do now that you don’t have to come to the office. A cardboard box is filled with the contents of your desk: your family pictures, desktop trinkets, snowball paperweight, and stale candy. Your ...

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There are many reasons why the costs of delivering simple, uncomplicated health care in this country keep increasing while quality lags and value fails to keep pace with that of most major industrialized countries. But as a surgeon, I have a one-word answer for all that is wrong with health care: “robots.” Surgical robots, costing an estimated 1.2 to 2.5 million dollars each with matching maintenance fees of $125,000 per year, ...

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