Readers know that I went to the University of Virginia as an undergraduate. Since graduating in 1971 I have remained a huge sports fan and academic fan of the university. Those who follow my Twitter account have seen me tweet often about the basketball team. Our coach, Tony Bennett, took his 5 pillars of success from his father, the famous coach Dick Bennett. While these pillars have a Christian origin, I ...

Read more...

I covered one of the chief residents in our hospital for two days recently, seeing more than 40 patients in total. My off-the-cuff remarks on Facebook still apply: “Twenty-two inpatients later, it is time once again to declare my awe and admiration for all who do this work daily: hospitalists, housestaff, nurses, techs, custodial staff (et al., et al.). And, of course, the patients who are -- on the other side ...

Read more...

I recently spoke to a class of undergraduates about the benefits, harms and politics of screening smokers for lung cancer using low-dose CT scans. Afterwards, a student asked how I felt about the Affordable Care Act's requirement that Medicare and private insurers cover U.S. Preventive Services Task Force "A" and "B" recommended screening tests and other preventive services without co-payments or deductibles, making them free at the point of care. I admitted that ...

Read more...

Going to the doctor starts as a disconcerting experience: Getting naked, physically and emotionally; talking about your weight, your smoking, your divorce. You count on your doctor’s ear and her discretion. Often enough, a patient will apologize for taking my time or for crying or whatever. I remind them that this is what the exam room is for, this is what they pay me for. How far does this special relationship ...

Read more...

Hospital medicine has rapidly become one of the largest specialties in the United States. As the number of practicing hospital medicine doctors soars above the 30,000 mark and health care reform takes hold, the specialty finds itself at the forefront of American medicine. And for good reason. It is a young, dynamic, varied and flexible specialty that can be practiced in a number of different settings. Hospital medicine doctors are ...

Read more...

Next in a series. Beginning with a deep understanding of medical science and years of training and experience, the primary care physician (PCP) needs to delve deeply into the patient’s personal, family and social setting in order to fully understand the context and causes of the patient’s illness. The PCP also needs to know when it is important or even critical to call upon others with specific knowledge, techniques or ...

Read more...

A while ago, Atul Gawande, the noted surgeon-author, wrote a long piece in the New Yorker on why health care should look to a restaurant called the Cheesecake Factory for some guidance on how to standardize things. This was met with some derision by a number of physicians who pointed out, among other things, that the food at the Cheesecake Factory is not great and is loaded with calories. But I ...

Read more...

Hegira: To take flight to escape.  To travel from a place of danger to a place of safety. “You have cancer.” You hear the words.  Your mind does not understand. “You have cancer.” Shock.  Distance.  Isolation.  Someone else.  A mistake.  A lie.  Bizarre, strange, you float above the room.  Everyone speaks; nothing is said. “You have cancer.” A fog-like curse, a venomous reality, a phantom idea.  A cold ghost foreign to the soul.  I must run. ...

Read more...

Barron Lerner thinks he understands doctor's motives.  In his recent article in the Atlantic he laments that physicians act on tradition and emotion over adopting new science.  In defense of his position, he sites the example of how cardiologists use angioplasty and coronary artery bypass to treat coronary disease. He states,

... cardiologists have been remarkably slow to abandon the old hypothesis, continuing to perform hundreds of thousands of bypass operations and ...

Read more...

Where I’m from, you can have someone killed for $5000.  I will do it for $1110. I’m a hand surgeon. I practice (or practiced, by the time you read this) in an area that is what we often refer to as “underserved.”   Rather, the area isn’t, but the people I treat are.  I work in a large urban referral center that has a very high proportion of Medicaid as well as ...

Read more...

Most Popular