The astronauts are halfway to Mars when suddenly one of them develops abdominal pain and requires surgery. What will they do? According to NASA, a miniature robot capable of assisting in surgery has been developed, tested in pigs, and is soon to be trialed in a weightless environment. The robot, which weighs less than 1 pound, can be inserted into the abdomen via the umbilicus and controlled remotely. The press release from ...

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Let’s talk about expectations. And I’m talking the Dickens’ kind. When you watch television, the food flaunts itself before you. Tempting you with golden buns and perfectly placed pickles. The models eating those perfectly styled burgers are the same -- airbrushed to perfection. Most often, limbs are stretched to unrealistic proportions and curves are molded and erased to fit someone’s view of beauty. When someone first takes the baby steps to venture into ...

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In a study in the American Journal of Infection Control, researchers coated a gloved hand in E. coli.  One person with the E. coli glove then they shook hands, high-fived, and fist bumped another person with a sterile glove.  Transfer of E. coli to the sterile glove was measured. Results:

  • highest transfer of bacteria: handshake
  • lowest transfer of bacteria: fist bump (high five was in the middle)
  • difference: fist bump less than 10% of ...

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I have a patient who is a full blown sufferer of health anxiety. He firmly believes he has full-blown AIDS after a single extramarital sexual contact (non-genital) one month prior with a woman not known to have HIV. (Reality check: The other person didn’t have HIV, the specific contact as described was ridiculously unlikely to have transmitted the virus had it been present, and AIDS takes months to years to develop ...

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HappySurgeon Judging from recent articlessurveys, and blog posts, the medical profession is remarkably demoralized. Typical complaints range from “feeling like a beaten dog” to “living in humiliating servitude,” to being forced to practice “treadmill medicine.” Interestingly, the public response to these complaints is largely indifferent. The prevailing attitude (if the comments sections of online articles and blog posts are representative) seems ...

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She was nearing the end of a long and interesting life. Her birth was announced on the party line in her rural community’s first telephone system. Her death, which would come soon, would be shared on Facebook and via cell phone. She had graduated with a degree in home economics from the University of Minnesota in 1938 and had worked for a meat packing company during and after World War ...

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Mrs. D was my last patient. I retired several months ago, and for some time prior I informed my patients so as to give them time to decide where they would like their follow-up care. Mrs. D was an elderly lady who I first met in the ER several years prior after a fall resulting in a displaced ankle fracture. She was pleasant and alert, understanding everything I was explaining after ...

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88.2% of all statistics are made up on the spot. - Victor Reeves There’s a growing movement in medicine in general and imaging in particular which wishes to attach a number to everything. It no longer suffices to say, “You’re at moderate risk for pulmonary embolism (PE).” We must quantify our qualification. Either by an interval: “Your chances of PE are between 15 and 45%.” Or, preferably, a point estimate: “You have a 15% chance ...

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Once again government regulators have put in place well-meaning rules without anticipating the consequences. We all hate sitting around in the emergency department waiting to be seen and to be treated. On October 15, 2014 as part of the new Affordable Health Care Act and the patient satisfaction portion, hospital ERs will have about 180 minutes from the time you arrive and sign in to evaluate you , treat you ...

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shutterstock_164368670 In a new Forbes article, David Shaywitz ponders whether patients are the best judges of physician quality. This is a very interesting question, not because the answer is elusive, but because the question itself is rather unusual, and may prove to be the harbinger of a new way of thinking about health care. The question raised by Dr. Shaywitz is not whether patients ...

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