shutterstock_134876816 You’ve probably heard that we remember negative things we’re told ten times longer than positive things. What’s the implication for those of us in the medical field? Does all that negativity create more burned out doctors? If you’re at all like me, those negative things started in your training. Did you feel tortured during grand rounds or oral board exams? Yeah. Me, too. And ...

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An excerpt from Burning the Short White Coat: A Story of Becoming a Woman Doctor. Chief’s pager went off and he looked at me. “It’s time to go down to the OR,” he said. "Just because you dated Dr. Lawson doesn't mean we are going to give you special treatment ...

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shutterstock_155822504 Readers know that I am a conservative practitioner.   I rail against overdiagnosis and overtreatment.  Less medicine results in more healing and protection.  In an example, I have explained previously why I advise patients not to undergo total body scans, despite the lure that they offer a cancerophobic public. I’ve never undergone a CXR in my life.   I’ve never entered medicine’s tunnel of ...

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shutterstock_138885635 I am presenting my startup costs here, to give some ideas for those providers who are considering starting their own family practice, or for those who say it can’t be done anymore. To become a business, I spent $50 for the state LLC filing, and $12 for business cards. I already had my medical license and DEA from residency, so the only certificate ...

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shutterstock_101193772 I have this life. It's not a cubicle life -- there's a lot of everything in it, and I never really know what the next hour will hold.  Whenever I talk to people about what I do, it's surprising to me that almost no one has any real clue what my life is really about. Here are the impressions that they tell ...

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I recently found something I had lost. Or rather, I found someone I had lost. He was a dear friend from my childhood. We spent days and nights roaming the woods near our homes, catching crawdads and minnows in the creek and turning rocks over to look for banded water snakes. We shot bows and arrows and rode bikes. Standard Appalachian stuff, that. In the winter, we would sled until we ...

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shutterstock_48561808 The medical world has made terrific scientific and technological progress over the last century. Previously incurable diseases can now be treated as day cases, and patients no longer have to accept a paternalistic, one-sided relationship with their doctors. Hospitals too, have a come a long way if you look at pictures of what they used to look like in those old ...

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physician pain scale This cartoon is based on data from the 2015 Medscape Physician Compensation Report. Dermatology is on one end, internal medicine on the other.   The other specialties in between.  Doesn't seem to be a trend between the cognitive and procedural specialities, which is a bit surprising.  You'd think the latter would skew towards the "happiness" side. Do you ...

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051809+Maureen+Dowd+p1 If I’m to take fashion advice from Maureen Dowd’s March 3 column, “Stroke of Fate,” a take-down of emergency medicine disguised as a recovery narrative of her niece, then I should exchange my white coat for grease-stained overalls. In her column, a Harvard neurology professor who specializes in stroke describes the brain as the Rolls-Royce of the human body. When it ...

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shutterstock_211897159 1. Due to intermittent monitoring versus continuous fetal monitoring which is standard in the hospital, the patient has increased mobility and a wider range of laboring positions/options: sitting, standing, walking, water, birthing balls. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has agreed that there is not a medical benefit to continuous fetal monitoring compared to intermittent monitoring in low-risk women. 2. ...

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