Barron Lerner thinks he understands doctor's motives.  In his recent article in the Atlantic he laments that physicians act on tradition and emotion over adopting new science.  In defense of his position, he sites the example of how cardiologists use angioplasty and coronary artery bypass to treat coronary disease. He states,

... cardiologists have been remarkably slow to abandon the old hypothesis, continuing to perform hundreds of thousands of bypass operations and ...

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Where I’m from, you can have someone killed for $5000.  I will do it for $1110. I’m a hand surgeon. I practice (or practiced, by the time you read this) in an area that is what we often refer to as “underserved.”   Rather, the area isn’t, but the people I treat are.  I work in a large urban referral center that has a very high proportion of Medicaid as well as ...

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A recent ProPublica expose co-published with the Boston Globe typifies a growing gotcha genre of health journalism that portrays doctors as the enemy in a struggle for honesty and openness in medicine. These reports make unfounded leaps in their efforts to subject doctors to levels of skepticism once reserved for politicians and lawyers. They’re going to end up doing patients a disservice. For this particular hunting expedition ProPublica set its sights on ...

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The creatures cause pain by being born, and live by inflicting pain, and in pain they mostly die. –C. S. Lewis The problem of pain, from the viewpoint of British novelist and theologian C. S. Lewis, is how to reconcile the reality of suffering with belief in a just and benevolent God. The American physician’s problem with pain is less cosmic and more concrete. For physicians today in nearly every specialty, the problem ...

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1797322_10202053927164294_2111408475_n Fact: Doctors want to help people. Fact: Some people take advantage of doctors. A doctor in Oregon shares this case:

I had an old man with cancer. He kept complaining of pain as I was increasing his opiate pain medication, Oxycontin. I was at, I forget, about 40mg four times a day or some fairly substantial dose. I ran a urine drug test. Negative ...

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Think for a second about the most treasured drug or device in your medical bag.  Or about the procedure you find most appealing, the disease or injury you most enjoy treating.  Personally, I really enjoy doing lumbar punctures, opening abscesses, placing IO lines and applying splints.  And because I’m an emergency physician, I am duty bound to say that I love to intubate ... and I do. I also enjoy doing ...

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Many times I have heard physicians and other providers lament that the outcomes for their patients would be so much better if they could “get them to listen and follow instructions.”  They understand that they can be most effective in treating patients if the patients would follow all of their directions. Do the physicians’ or care providers’ responsibilities end with this wish?  Can physicians do more than just hope and pray ...

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There is a JAMA article out that is very telling: Medical Conspiracy Theories and Health Behaviors in the United States. It is a must-read article for anyone who wonders why the public does not seem to advocate for themselves when it comes to their medical care in the US. The first theory studied in the article states that the FDA is purposely preventing the public from getting natural cures ...

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There are reports from across the country regarding severe influenza in young people. In addition to mechanical ventilation, many are requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Given the severity of illness and the presence of multiple organ dysfunction, relying on an oral antiviral for influenza therapy seems unwise. However, at this point, the only option for intravenous therapy is IV zanamivir, which is not approved by the FDA, but available on ...

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It’s rare for doctors to turn out en masse for a public protest. But that’s what happened at “Doccupy” in Contra Costa County, California in 2012. A group of safety net physicians testified before county supervisors -- in what they only half-jokingly called “Doccupy” -- that the cumbersome move to electronic health records (EHRs) had taken an enormous toll on patient care. The doctors saw half their usual number of patients. ...

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