The following column was published on May 28, 2011 in FoxNews.com. Theresa Brown’s New York Times op-ed, Physician, Heel Thyself, recently introduced hospital bullying into the national health care conversation. In it, she recounted a hospital vignette while working as an oncology nurse.  A patient asked a doctor who should he blame for a late test result. ...

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This past spring, I took the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) exam. 7 weeks later, I received my results.  Thankfully, I passed. This was not entirely a surprise, as the pass rate for first-time test takers was 88%.  But it definitely requires some studying.  It's not a gimmie. Considering that I last took my board exam ...

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Not all cancer screening saves lives. I alluded to this recently in a New York Times' Room for Debate piece, discussing why Medicare shouldn't pay for prostate cancer screening in men over the age of 75. And, when it comes to ovarian cancer screening, a recent study showed that annual CA-125 antigen testing and transvaginal ultrasound did not save lives. ...

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Occasionally, I'm given the opportunity to write for the New York Times' Room for Debate blog. For those who aren't familiar with the site, every day Room for Debate addresses one question, with various experts chiming in with 300-word op-ed style pieces.  Writers normally have overnight to submit their columns. The recent question asked, "What items and procedures should Medicare stop paying for now, even if patients and their families object?" Of ...

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Medical school should be free. That's an argument made by physicians Peter B. Bach and Robert Kocher in the New York Times. This isn't a new concept.  I've discussed whether medical school should be free for students who choose primary care.  And, for some in the country, it's already happening.  Like at Case Western Reserve University, for instance.  The ...

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According to one of the  the guidelines set forth by the AMA about professionalism in social media, "When physicians see content posted by colleagues that appears unprofessional they have a responsibility to bring that content to the attention of the individual, so that he or she can remove it and/or take other appropriate actions." With that in mind, Bryan Vartabedian, ...

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There's an underlying tension between physicians and health policy experts. Health policy experts take subtle jibes against physicians in their analyses, with many feeling American doctors are overpaid, which exacerbates health costs.  They tend to be politically progressive, and generally dismiss the issues that most doctors care deeply about.  Medical malpractice, tort reform and the cost of medical education, for ...

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According to a recent study, providing physicians with the cost of lab tests cut costs. As reported by the WSJ's Health Blog,

A new study finds that simply making physicians aware of the cost of regular blood tests cut the daily bill for the tests by as much as 27% ... At the beginning of the program, the daily cost ...

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Little has been written about the impact a malpractice lawsuit has on physicians. But physicians who've been sued have a higher rate of suicide, and emergency physician Edwin Leap wrote about how doctors are emotionally scarred from the grueling ordeal of a trial. A recent piece from American Medical News puts faces on the toll:

The key to surviving ...

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The case of the neurologist who sued a patient for a negative online review has come to an end. Predictably, the court ruled against the physician and dismissed the lawsuit. To recap, the physician was upset by the slew of negative online reviews he received, and claimed that the patient,

defamed him and interfered with his business by making false statements ...

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