Websites that encourage patients to share their experiences are growing in popularity. But how reliable are they, and for those that are profit-driven, how do they make their money? A recent story in the New York Times attempts to answer those questions. There are plenty of benefits that these sites offer, like providing patients with a virtual support group of sorts. That's something that most find tremendously helpful and is missing ...

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Welcome readers from CNN.com! "E-patients are an essential part of the health care team, and play an increasingly influential role in the shared decision making process with their physicians." My CNN column on how empowered patients can help doctors That's what I wrote in a CNN.com column published this morning, entitled, Will the doctor answer your e-mail? However, doctors aren't given the tools or the time to properly engage empowered patients, despite ...

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The trauma for Artyom continues. After having been given up to an orphanage by his alcoholic mother who lost her parental rights, being adopted by a US family, sent back to Russia alone when his adoptive mother allegedly was unable to cope with his psychological problems, he has now become the object of a tug-of war between Russia and the US over his citizenship. His future seems to hold unimaginable ...

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I'm a doctor. We get all the glory. And credit. And guess what? We only deserve part of it. I started out in medicine in the mid-80's, volunteering at an ER. And the biggest shock to me was learning how much of what happens in a hospital is nurse territory. Doctors will see you anywhere from 5 to 30 minutes a day, depending on how sick you are. And the rest ...

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by Brad Stuart, MD Rob Pardi’s comments in Pallimed affected me deeply. His honesty, integrity, and willingness to share were so impressive that I feel reluctant to take issue with anything he had to say. Yet today I find myself somewhat in conflict with his message. Rob’s wife, a palliative care doctor, died of cancer recently and her story, published in the New York Times made it sound as if ...

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An excerpt from Top 5 Questions to Ask Your Doctor by Sagar Nigwekar, MD and James Sutton, RPA-C Tips for Talking to Your Doctor Entering a doctor’s office can be like entering a different world. There are often “rules” and “protocols” that the doctor, nurses, and staff follow that you may not be familiar with. This book offers some very helpful questions for you to have an intelligent conversation ...

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How many patients actually take the prescription drugs that their doctors prescribe them? Less than you think. Pauline Chen, in a recent New York Times' column, discusses the worrisome issue of medication noncompliance. And the numbers are stark. According to the data, "as many as half of all patients did not follow their doctors’ advice when it came to medications," and, "more than 20 percent of first-time patient prescriptions were never ...

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The new definition of participatory medicine at the Society’s website notes that patients “shift from being mere passengers to responsible drivers of their health, and … providers encourage and value them as full partners.” As with any collaboration, this must include a hefty dose of listening by both parties. I recently returned from an extraordinary week in Minnesota, with visits to several thought-provoking care facilities. The week was all about ...

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by Sandeep Grewal, MD We as doctors and patients as well as medicine as a whole have evolved over time. What used to be a simple conversation of between a doctor and a patient has turned into a melee of medical issues, legal issues, insurance and financial issues and not to mention the complicated ICD 9 and CPT code system. Conversation between a doctor and patient in 1960s: Patient: Sir, I am ...

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Correctional psychiatrists inevitably treat patients who have been convicted of a broad array of crimes. There is a correlation between the security level of the institutions in which one works and the severity of the crimes of the inmates being housed there. Since I’ve treated inmates of minimum, medium, and maximum custody levels, I’ve had the opportunity to work with people who have been convicted of everything from drug possession to ...

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