At least 12 college students have been diagnosed with Meningitis type B (MenB) this year, and cases like this may spread to other campuses unless the Food and Drug Administration intervenes.  While people of any age can contract the infection that affects the brain and spinal cord, children and people over 60 are more likely to contract the infection.  So, too, are college students because of their close contacts in dormitories and ...

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Kayla wrote in:

Hello!  I am curious what you think about essential oils.  They have recently become incredibly popular in my community, but I am pretty skeptical because so much of the enthusiasm is coming from those who have signed up as ‘distributors’ with doTerra or Young Living (2 essential oil multi-level marketing companies.). The biggest concern I have is that these companies (and all these new distributors) recommend taking many ...

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“I used to be strong, I wrestled the bull,” Sumner Ball said, “but now I can’t even wrestle the rooster.” On the far side of eighty-years-old, he looked lively and trim, and his weathered face hinted at a smile as his blue eyes peered straight into mine. “I think these cholesterol pills are hurting my muscles,” he declared. “I don’t think they’re good for me.” “Is it your back?” I scanned through his last ...

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Drug shortages can jeopardize patient safety A guest column by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. When doctors don’t have access to medications that are necessary to successfully perform procedures, patient safety is at risk. Over the past several years, drug shortages have significantly impacted the health care industry, making it not only difficult for physicians to do their jobs, but for ...

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Every once in a while a brilliant investigative journalist can get us back on track when we have been led badly astray. I hope that a recent New York Times front page story, "The Selling of Attention Deficit Disorder," by Alan Schwarz will have that kind of special societal impact. Schwartz has previously written a series of accurate and hard-hitting articles exposing the over-diagnosis of ADHD and the consequent careless and excessive ...

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I rather doubt you need me to bring the roiling statin debate to your attention, given its prominence in scientific circles and mass media alike. In essence, a new set of guidelines for the use of lipid-lowering drugs to prevent heart disease was issued with considerable fanfare and then set off a firestorm of controversy. The old approach relied heavily on levels of LDL cholesterol, while the new approach ...

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Part of Katie Couric’s controversy on her show about the HPV vaccine was the claim by her expert, Dr. Diane Harper, that the vaccine only lasts for 5 years. I mean, why promote a 5 year vaccine to adolescent girls that will wear off and leave them at risk during their 20s? The problem with this controversy over the duration of vaccine effectiveness is that it is entirely manufactured. Dr. ...

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We can now add vitamin B12 deficiency to the growing list of risks of long term use of the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The New York Times had an article outlining the evidence that prolonged use of both proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) like Prilosec, Protonix, Prevacid and others, as well as the less potent H2 blockers like Zantac and Pepcid, can lead to vitamin B12 deficiency.  This is in addition to ...

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Let’s say you were inventing a new flea powder, called Flea-B-Gone. To test it and manufacture it, you’d need a whole mess of fleas. As everyone knows, kangaroo fleas are hardy and docile, so you open up a kangaroo farm to grow your fleas. You treat the kangaroos well, and other than itchiness, they don’t have much to complain about as you scrape off their fleas to make your Flea-B-Gone. ...

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Research shows that about 1 in every 5 pediatric visits for “sick visits” results in an antibiotic prescription. Now not all of those antibiotics are taken; many pediatricians now use the rx pad for “wait and see” or “delayed prescribing” antibiotics. They give a prescription and allow the family to watch and wait -- if a child is not getting better, they advise parents to start taking them. However, in total ...

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