I rather doubt you need me to bring the roiling statin debate to your attention, given its prominence in scientific circles and mass media alike. In essence, a new set of guidelines for the use of lipid-lowering drugs to prevent heart disease was issued with considerable fanfare and then set off a firestorm of controversy. The old approach relied heavily on levels of LDL cholesterol, while the new approach ...

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Part of Katie Couric’s controversy on her show about the HPV vaccine was the claim by her expert, Dr. Diane Harper, that the vaccine only lasts for 5 years. I mean, why promote a 5 year vaccine to adolescent girls that will wear off and leave them at risk during their 20s? The problem with this controversy over the duration of vaccine effectiveness is that it is entirely manufactured. Dr. ...

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We can now add vitamin B12 deficiency to the growing list of risks of long term use of the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The New York Times had an article outlining the evidence that prolonged use of both proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) like Prilosec, Protonix, Prevacid and others, as well as the less potent H2 blockers like Zantac and Pepcid, can lead to vitamin B12 deficiency.  This is in addition to ...

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Let’s say you were inventing a new flea powder, called Flea-B-Gone. To test it and manufacture it, you’d need a whole mess of fleas. As everyone knows, kangaroo fleas are hardy and docile, so you open up a kangaroo farm to grow your fleas. You treat the kangaroos well, and other than itchiness, they don’t have much to complain about as you scrape off their fleas to make your Flea-B-Gone. ...

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Research shows that about 1 in every 5 pediatric visits for “sick visits” results in an antibiotic prescription. Now not all of those antibiotics are taken; many pediatricians now use the rx pad for “wait and see” or “delayed prescribing” antibiotics. They give a prescription and allow the family to watch and wait -- if a child is not getting better, they advise parents to start taking them. However, in total ...

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It’s once more cold season, bringing up the question parents commonly face. Should they buy one of those rows and rows of cough, sneeze, and runny nose medicines one finds in every drug store and supermarket? In a nushell, no -- none of the preparations sold over-the-counter to treat upper respiratory infections in children work, and all could be dangerous. That’s the conclusion of a report some years ago by the Food and Drug Administration, ...

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New guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association on the assessment of cardiovascular risk and the manipulation of cholesterol levels to mitigate that risk have certainly been in the news. The guidelines appropriately use high quality evidence to abandon old untested or unproven paradigms such as treatment to LDL targets and manipulation of non-HDL cholesterol as a secondary goal. In many ways, the new guidelines ...

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The HPV vaccine is in the news again. This time it is Katie Couric’s daytime talk show that is shining the spotlight. And, I am thankful. A medicine that prevents cancer is worth giving airtime. In the segment, Couric chose to highlight the experience of 3 mother-daughter duos and their experience with the HPV vaccine. One story ended in loss, one in pain, and one in quiet confidence. Couric also highlighted advice from ...

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I just returned from the annual American Heart Association meeting where I heard distinguished cardiologists and researchers from around the world present the latest in cardiovascular disease. Yet, amidst all the late-breaking clinical trial presentations and ask-the-expert sessions, what I didn't hear were the speakers' financial conflicts of interest. Don't get me wrong -- the AHA mandates that all speakers present a disclosure slide at the beginning of every talk, and this rule was ...

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Ever get confused over the names of medicines? I do. There’s Zantac and Xanax. Zanaflex and Zaleplon. But Zanaflex is also known as tizanidine. Tizanidine functions very differently than Zantac and its other name, ranitidine, even though they sound alike. Every drug has (at least) two names -- one proprietary, and one generic. Proprietary names are created to sound catchy by the original manufacturer, almost always under a patent. The generic names are more like chemical ...

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