This time of year I get a lot of questions from fourth-year medical students about applying to residency. So, here's my answer to the question, "What should I look for in a good family medicine (FM) residency program?" It's FM, so everyone (for the most part) is going to be nice, friendly, and welcoming when you go to visit. They will show you a curriculum that's in line with the Accreditation ...

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Let me begin with by extending a hearty congratulation on matriculating to medical school. The pre-med years were tough with organic chemistry, staying involved with leadership activities, chasing down the elusive letter of recommendation, and sitting for the MCAT. But you did it. Be proud of what you've accomplished because you're one step closer to becoming a doctor. You may have fears, concerns or misgivings about what is coming your way and this ...

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Should I be a nurse or a doctor? Having been both a nurse and a doctor, most of the questions I get from readers have to do with making the decision between nursing and medicine.  Let’s lay aside for a moment the reality that the fields are totally different and that direct comparisons are useless. But people ask me all the time, so as a little experiment, I ...

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Suicide Med: A medical school thrillerSuicide Med: A medical school thriller An excerpt from Suicide Med. “I wish I had become a ballet dancer instead.” I use the back of my forearm to swipe at strands of dark hair that have come loose from the tight bun at the back of my head. The attempt fails and the escaped locks fall back ...

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I recently read an interesting article in Glamour about why Zosia Mamet, an actress on HBO’s Girls, refuses to “lean in.”  While the column focuses on the influence of modern-day feminism on notions of professional success, her words resonated with me as a medical student and an aspiring psychiatrist.

“I have been incredibly blessed with success in my chosen career. I’ve worked my a** off and had the support and encouragement of ...

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Since joining my current practice two years ago, I've noticed that I care for a disproportionate number of immigrants of Chinese and other Asian descent compared to my colleagues. Although both of my parents were born in Taiwan, I don't speak Mandarin or have special expertise on medical conditions common in Asian Americans. Nonetheless, Asian patients seem more comfortable with me anyway. Similarly, U.S. health workforce analyses show that underrepresented ...

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I recently read some statistics that shocked me, but not really. In the U.S., 60% of medical students come from families with incomes in the top 20% of the nation. Meanwhile, only 3% come from families with incomes in the lowest 20%. Not much socioeconomic diversity in the house of medicine. Now, I realized early on that I didn’t have a lot of company in this respect, but I didn’t think ...

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Dear Jane: Thank you for asking me about my perspectives on medical school. Here are some general principles that you might find useful in your own training: 1. View everyone as your teacher. Everyone you encounter will teach you something. Be open to what they have to offer. Yes, your professors and attendings, the “official” teachers, will educate you. Patients, however, will often be your best teachers. Listen to what they say, watch how ...

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Most physicians recall the medical school ritual of unboxing our first stethoscope. From the first physical diagnosis course, we were all solemnly instructed as to the importance of the physical examination in the diagnosis and of management of illness. Given that perhaps the most notable use of the stethoscope is cardiac auscultation, it would seem that this should hold particularly true for cardiology. And yet, on moving from classroom to bedside, ...

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A new study poses one of the most vexing ethical questions concerning research with human beings: When is it acceptable to conduct research without the consent of the research subject? In emergency situations, patients often arrive at the hospital unconscious or with severely impaired decision-making capacity. Progress in medical practice depends on results from carefully designed research; yet in these emergency cases such patients are unable to fulfill one of the ...

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