shutterstock_250745014 Two years ago, during my second year of medical school, my classmates and I sat in cramped auditorium chairs as our instructor presented us with a clinical scenario. We were learning about arrhythmias, and our instructor flipped through slides of different ECG patterns, asking how we would respond to each. After several less concerning ones, the slide flashed ventricular fibrillation: an irregular ...

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Suturing As if med students don't have enough to worry about in the OR. James Chang is a radiologist and author of Oh Doctor, The Places You Will Go… He blogs at Poor MD and can be reached on Facebook.

shutterstock_267760397 I have been exposed to many patient interactions during my first year of medical school. However, my first real patient interaction was when I accompanied my attending to a homeless shelter in downtown Phoenix. I can clearly remember being very excited the day before the visit to the homeless shelter; this was to be the first time I would actually interact with real patients. ...

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I’m thankful that my first rotation was family medicine out in Youngstown, Ohio. Youngstown is a small town halfway between Cleveland and Pittsburgh. Everything moves a little slower out there compared to what I’m used to in Brooklyn and Manhattan. Similarly, my family medicine rotation as a whole was slower and calmer compared to my other rotations. I didn’t see any emergency conditions or an excessive number of rare pathologies ...

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robotic prostate exam Medical schools across the country are embracing simulated and virtual patients to train medical students. Drexel University and the University of Florida use a device called Patrick, "a simulated patient that talks to medical students while offering real-time feedback about the virtual prostate exam he’s receiving." Image credit: QKED Science

An excerpt from So You Got Into Medical School... Now What?: A Guide to Preparing for the Next Four Years. By far one of the most unique experiences first-year medical students can have is working in the gross anatomy lab. From the potent smell of formaldehyde to the chill of ...

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shutterstock_183558071 Mais où sont les neiges d’antan? But where are the snows of yesteryear? Not many people are experts in medieval French poetry. It’s a tiny little corner of academia, filled with people whose passions and imaginations lie a millennium in the past. And so many of those academics, and I do use that term in the most tweed-wearing, bookish, kindly way possible, have ...

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shutterstock_166395998 Kaitlyn Elkins was a medical student at the Wake Forest School of Medicine in North Carolina and a member of the class of 2015. She excelled academically, named the valedictorian of her high school class and graduating summa cum laude from Campbell University. She wrote poetry in her free time. She had a cat, lovingly named Gatito. On April 11, 2013, just ...

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We’ve all heard it said that learning medicine is like drinking from a firehose. Yet many students and schools don’t use one of the most effective study techniques available to them. Spaced repetition is a powerful, evidence-based study technique that can enhance learning and long-term retention of medical knowledge. Medical students and schools could both benefit from understanding and using spaced repetition to produce more knowledgeable and better-informed doctors. Over a ...

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Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has been classically described as “the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.”  At first look, this well-accepted approach to clinical medicine appears not only completely reasonable, but also somewhat obvious given the immense amount of research available for academic consumption. EBM has been repeatedly preached as the gold standard of clinical care across all medical ...

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