“I remember how hard it was to be a third-year medical student,” one of my residents once said to me. “You have to appear constantly enthusiastic. You feel continuously judged and evaluated. And worst of all, you know, deep inside, that if you were to get a cold or something and not show up one day, not one bit of the daily workflow would change because as far as pivotal ...

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I recently recreated a now-famous business school study on a subset of residents in my internal medicine residency program. In the original study, researchers asked students to read a case of the real-life venture capitalist Heidi Roizen, who expertly leveraged an extensive professional network to forward her career.  Half of the students read the original case; half were given a case in which Heidi's name was switched to Howard -- a ...

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Her nails were painted. She probably had them done just a couple of days ago. The bright red polish glistened on her perfectly filed fingernails. She had her toes done too. Was she preparing for the holiday season? Had she begun her Christmas shopping yet? Was she making a list of new year's resolutions? It didn't matter anymore. She was lying there. The cold metal table provided the platform for her lifeless, still body. ...

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Last year, I visited my brother in Rhode Island at Johnson & Wales University. We took a culinary school class together learning about the fundamentals of Italian and German cuisine. What were two medical students doing in culinary school? As a fourth-year medical student, I learn the science and art of caring for the body and mind. Unfortunately, the majority of patients are plagued by ailments secondary to chronic preventable diseases ...

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Premedical education has become disconnected from medicine. Rather than helping students evaluate whether medicine is right for them or preparing students to enter the discipline, the premedical gauntlet encourages students to blindly discipline themselves according to rigid criteria. For example, during a recent trip to the pre-health advising office at my university, my advisors presented me with the “A.C.E. checklist.” It includes the three accomplishments every candidate should have before applying ...

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Dear third-year medical student: It’s hard to believe as I am writing this, that I am in my last rotation of third year. This year has been amazing and has gone by so quickly. There is no way to predict or to prepare for what your third year will have in store, but if it is anything like mine, it will be full of ups and downs. Moments that you will ...

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In 1978, my mother interviewed for dental school. On her post-interview tour of the school, her male tour guide assumed she was applying for dental hygiene school and showed her only those areas of the school. Upon my mother informing him that she was applying for dental school, he smirked and said, “Good luck getting in, you’re a woman,” and walked away laughing. Of course in 1978, overt sexism was neither ...

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I watch as my almost-2-year-old daughter awkwardly climbs the stairs. I do not hold her hand, but I do not turn my back on her either. She is still clumsy, and her little-bowed legs often miss their targeted landing spots. She holds on to the rail with a vice grip that steadies each monumental step forward and upward. Every so often she wobbles as she miscalculates the distances and her toes ...

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As a third year medical student, I am as green as they come. As much as I feign familiarity in the hospitals, each day of every rotation brings a host of firsts: first time suturing, first natural delivery, first terminal patient, first 24-hour shift, first code blue. The novelty of these experiences is equal parts exhilarating and overwhelming. As future physicians, we have invested the better parts of our time, ...

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I remember attending an eight-hour seminar on my job, where experts educated new nurses about the transition we would experience in our profession. We learned about the change theory and the different levels of transition, from novice to expert. I remember not taking the two-day session very seriously, thinking that my accelerated three-year nursing degree had prepared me well for the workplace. Now that my one year of practicing as ...

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