The national Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) strives to “recognize students, residents and faculty who are exemplars of compassionate patient care and who serve as role models, mentors, and leaders in medicine.” This society relies initially on a validated peer nomination tool to identify medical students who embody clinical competence, caring, and community service. Upon discovering this emphasis on peer nomination, I began to question my own humanism, wondering which ...

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Back in September, an Inside Stanford Medicine article featured my first-year medical school class on our first day of anatomy. It spoke of learning anatomy and having the privilege to work on real donors’ bodies as a “rite of passage,” something all medical students must do to really discover the human body. We were all very excited, yet timid, on that first day of anatomy class, I remember. Afraid ...

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I am always on a quest to be helpful. For this reason, a life in medicine has always made perfect sense to me. My interest in surgery also developed early when I had been performing music for Alzheimer’s patients in high school. It was almost unbelievable to help these individuals reconnect with their memories and surroundings through my music. But I left each day frustrated and aching, knowing that these ...

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It was 1 a.m. on a Sunday night on call, and we were waiting patiently for admissions in the resident workroom. We were four near-perfect strangers, yet we had one thing in common: our challenges we faced in maintaining relationships. Was it truly because of our shared profession of medicine or because of our similar personalities that led us into the field? We realized we struggled preserving our current relationships ...

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Dear future colleague, What a tremendous thing it is to know you are becoming a physician!  You are devoting your life and talents to the betterment of the health of your future patients, your local community, and our entire society.  You have responded to the call to serve in a profession that is hundreds of years old, steeped in tradition but vehemently progressive, always changing, and vowing to remain abreast of ...

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I recently gave a teaching workshop focused on giving feedback. Thrilled to share my passion for medical education, I excitedly prepared my slides, ready to discuss tools that can help make someone a more effective educator. Despite the evidence and the recommendations from well-known educators I presented, there was an attendee that was dubious. The inevitable question arose, “But, why?” Why, this person asked, take the time to give feedback when ...

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I went to medical school to go into family medicine. During my interview when I said I wanted to do family medicine, the interviewer looked me up and down and said, "You know, you don’t have to say that just because you are at (insert name of primary care focused medical school)." Now, less than two years into medical school, I'm watching with sadness as the "con" side of my pro/con ...

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Slave, I am not Servant, I may be Arrogant, I am not Ignorant, I may be Un-engaged, I am not However, Quiet, I may be. Your coat is long, mine short Your knowledge mile deep, mine mile wide You have seen 100 patients this week, I have seen 10 You trained for 10 years, this is my first If I look scared, it’s because I am If I seem intimidated, I indeed am If I appear confused, I in fact am If I ...

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At the start of the first week of the medical school at the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, students get introduced to the anatomy lab, and by the end of the week, the first dissection occurs. Students study muscles, blood vessels, nerves, and other structures on dead bodies they dissect under the instruction of Dr. Abdo Jurjus, the anatomy course coordinator and instructor. First-year medical students spend around 3 hours a ...

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Many people know that an important part of medical school is choosing a specialty — the field of medicine that you plan to practice for the rest of your career. However, fewer people know just how many different factors weigh on this decision. As my classmates and I navigate through third year, I thought I would share several of the factors that enter the balancing act: Clinical interest: The simplest, yet ...

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