shutterstock_189429203 Desiree wrote in, “My 15-month daughter and a few other kids at her daycare were just diagnosed with hand-foot-mouth disease. I would like to hear how common it is, what treatments (or ways to soothe) you find helpful, and how you would differentiate this from measles or chickenpox.  For example, my little one has blisters all over her body, not just H-F-M.  ...

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shutterstock_94423981 A recent series of articles in the Washington Post and a segment on NPR have caused quite a stir. The articles are about what we have called for decades shaken baby syndrome. It can be fatal. We now use the term non-accidental head trauma. This term replaced the older one because it is more specific; children ...

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shutterstock_128145248 Currently the HPV (human papilloma virus) vaccines are approved in the United States up to the age of 26. This has nothing to do with safety but due to the fact that the studies submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) involved this age range. The HPV vaccines were primarily studied in women aged 26 years and younger because age ...

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shutterstock_109841906 Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 28-year-old man is evaluated for a 5-year history of recurrent headache that occurs several times per month and lasts 12 to 24 hours. He describes the headache as a bilateral frontal pressure associated with nasal congestion and sensitivity to light, sound, and ...

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I am often struck that those I work with who have enormous reasons to be depressed -- they may be poor, physically ill, uneducated, and very crazy -- are not depressed, not at least as I describe depression, a state of melancholy and dejection.  In my view, there is a terrible, terrible hopelessness in these situations and in these lives.  And then, there is William Jenkins. With William, I find I ...

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shutterstock_149926556 Note: This case is meant to illustrate the potential negative effects of inappropriate imaging.  It is not intended as a diatribe towards any member of the health care team.  Really the only “mistake” made here was the ordering of the CT scan in the first place. A 37-year-old woman presents to her local emergency department (ED) with a 4-hour history of heartburn ...

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shutterstock_169002578 Much of medicine is no harder than Mom, a Band-Aid and a scrapped knee. Flu shots save lives, give flu shots. Bleeding causes anemia, give iron or, if severe, blood. There is a fracture, fix it. A boil hurts, lance it.  This is not rocket science. Perhaps medicine is so simple that it can be automated. Instead of a doctor at all, ...

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While I consider myself to be an ethical practitioner, I am not perfect, and neither is the medical profession. I will present a recurrent ethical dilemma to my fair and balanced readers and await their judgment. Our gastroenterology practice, like all of our competitors, has an open access endoscopy option. This permits a physician to refer a patient to us for a colonoscopy, without the need for an initial office visit. Patients ...

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shutterstock_137498780 One of my favorite physician sayings is, "Don’t just do something, stand there!" Which means that it’s better to do nothing than to do something that doesn’t help. As I move through my career, I find myself agreeing. I am endlessly amazed at the number of things we do for no good reason, and that patients come to expect, also for ...

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shutterstock_220684471 When you send your kid to dance class, it's reasonable to think that not only are they learning how to dance, but that they are getting exercise. Most parents think that way; dance class certainly gets mentioned when I ask parents in my practice what their children do for exercise. Not so much, says a study just published in the ...

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