by Michael Smith, North American Correspondent, MedPage Today A minimum of 3.4 million doses of vaccine against H1N1 pandemic flu will be available in the first week of October, the CDC said. medpage-today Those doses -- all in the form of a live attenuated nasal spray vaccine -- may be supplemented by some injectable vaccine, according to Jay Butler, MD, the ...

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by Michael Smith, North American Correspondent, MedPage Today People infected with the H1N1 pandemic flu strain continue to shed virus after the point where current recommendations say they can go back to work or school, two studies here suggested. medpage-today The question, experts said, is whether those people are still contagious and whether a longer stay-at-home period would prevent enough additional ...

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by Cole Petrochko, Staff Writer, MedPage Today Don't wait for the pandemic H1N1 vaccine to become available before getting an inoculation for seasonal flu, the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases warned. medpage-today Putting off routine flu shots in hopes of one-stop-shopping would defeat the primary line of defense against a proven threat, according to a panel representing some of the nation's ...

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by Michael Kirsch, MD Consider this hypothetical vignette. Tiger Woods accepts my challenge to play 18 holes. Obviously, the gallery would be packed with golf enthusiasts who would cancel job interviews, vacations and even worship services in order to witness this historic competition. Spectators would be permitted to place bets at even money. Perhaps, my mother would bet on me, but no other sane person would. They would properly conclude that ...

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The following is part of a series of original guest columns by the American Medical Association. by Nancy H. Nielsen, MD This year’s flu season promises to be different than in years past. With the potential of both seasonal and H1N1 influenza circulating this year, it is more critical than ever that health care professionals proactively talk to their patients about influenza. Many patients will be confused about who needs the H1N1 ...

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by Nancy Walsh, Contributing Writer, MedPage Today Almost 3% of healthy, asymptomatic people who underwent MRI brain scans showed incidental abnormalities in a recent study, leading researchers to express concern about about psychological and medical fallout from these increasingly popular screenings. medpage-todayIn meta-analysis of MRI brain scans, the prevalence of neoplastic incidental findings was 0.70% (95% CI 0.47 to 0.98), while ...

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Parents who have a critically ill infant can exhibit symptoms later on similar to those who have been through war. And indeed, this article in The New York Times draws parallels between the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and a warzone, "with the alarms, the noises, and death and sickness." Infants in the NICU can cause the parents to experience multiple traumas, starting with a premature birth, where many of the ...

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Here are words any patient awaiting cancer surgery would be thrilled to hear: "We are canceling your upcoming operation! It turns out that the suspicious changes we saw on your recent biopsy are completely benign." This happy turn of events happened in my life recently, thanks to a second opinion from a type of physician few patients realize plays a critical role in their care: the pathologist. Pathologists are medical doctors who ...

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by Maya Sequeira Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s death in 1791 has long been a mystery, but a new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that it was, of all things, a common strep infection that killed the maestro at the age of 35. Researchers speculate that Mozart contracted the strep infection—easily treatable today—from a fellow musician who had been hospitalized at a crowded military hospital in Vienna. It’s not ...

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Before telling this story, I’m going to have to lay some background for my non-medical readers. The most obscene word in English, in my opinion, has three letters and is an acronym. It’s tPA (it stands for Tissue Plasminogen Activator). This drug gets a lot of press as a "clotbuster." It has the potential to break down clots and reverse a stroke. That potential, however, has a dark side. By breaking down ...

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