Recently, a young child died following days of vomiting. He had been in shallow water in a Texas dike about a week before his death. The story was picked up as an alleged case of a rare condition called dry drowning or secondary drowning. The media accounts went viral, spreading significant fear in parenting communities and among those learning about these alleged conditions from the news ...

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Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 21-year-old woman is evaluated for mosquito bites on her arms and legs that she received 1 week ago that she has been scratching regularly. One of the bites on her left thigh is now painful with a small amount of drainage. She otherwise feels well, has ...

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When a child is diagnosed with cancer, overwhelmed parents and patients are often laser-focused on the path to cure. Even though parents do not welcome pain or discomfort for their child, they may feel that symptoms are a necessary cost of curative care. Likewise, it is easy for us, as pediatric oncologists, to accept symptoms and side effects of treatment as normal. Important new research challenges this assumption and challenges ...

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The first thing I remember as I regained consciousness, lying in a hospital emergency room, was hearing a nurse ask my mom if I was allergic to any foods. With my eyes still closed, I said, “asparagus,” thinking this might reduce the chances of anyone serving me what was then a dreaded vegetable. “Asparagus,” repeated the nurse, making a note on my admission form. And then, with a chuckle and what must ...

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“Noncardiac chest pain” was Laurie Black’s discharge diagnosis. Her chest CT angiogram didn’t show a pulmonary embolus, her troponins were negative for a heart attack and her nuclear stress test was negative for coronary ischemia. “So what do you think it was?” she asked while I read through her hospital discharge summary. “I don’t know. Show me where the pain was,” I answered. “It started on my back, on the left side, and ...

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One of the privileges of being a health care provider these days is having access to innovative technologies designed to help save lives. My colleagues and I were recently surprised to discover a powerful tool that could be useful in our line of work: journalists.

I am part of an interdisciplinary team that focuses on finding ...

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An excerpt from Looking Out for Number Two: A Slightly Irreverent Guide to Poo, Gas, and Other Things That Come Out of Your Baby. Early bowel patterns | What's normal As we learned, the poo patterns of new babies don’t settle in until a week or two after birth. And ...

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A new study about the best place for babies to sleep -- in their own rooms, or sharing a room with their parents -- contradicts current AAP guidelines. But hopefully, in the long run, it will help more parents and babies get a better night’s sleep overall. The most recent “safe sleep” guidelines were published in 2016. They stressed evidence-based recommendations for the safest way for babies ...

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I recently read a post by oncologist Dr. Stephanie Graff on the experience of blame, from self and others, that people with cancer are subjected to:

The talk about risk factors and early detection makes us think we can achieve perfection, and that cancer is somehow a personal fault … let us stop making accusations and blaming persons diagnosed with cancer. They are blameless.
Her post, "Read more...

Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 28-year-old pregnant woman is evaluated for a cardiac murmur identified on examination by her obstetrician. She is asymptomatic. She is in her 24th week of pregnancy. Medical history is unremarkable, and there is no family history of heart disease. She takes prenatal vitamins and no other ...

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