Autism was first reported in the medical literature 70 years ago. In 1943 a child psychologist named Leo Kanner described a child with social difficulties and repetitive, stereotypic movements; the following year Hans Asperger described four such children. Since then we have gradually learned more about what we now call autism spectrum disorders (ASD), although we still do not know what causes it. From early on it was apparent that the ...

Read more...

We need to start skin cancer prevention with our children The numbers about skin cancer incidence and costs in the United States are worse than anyone expected. That's the message that comes from a report published recently in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine on research from the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Cancer Institute. The researchers took a look at the number of skin cancers ...

Read more...

The costs of fertility preservation in cancer treatment I have fertility on my mind -- and it’s definitely not personal. And it’s really fertility preservation that has me thinking. I recently completed the manuscript of my 10th book -- a text for oncology care providers about the provision of psychosocial care to young adults with cancer . Writing the book was at times frustrating due to the paucity of research and ...

Read more...

Four months ago, a 44-year-old woman was referred to me by her audiologist and ENT for acute deafness of the right ear. She is a healthy woman without any past medical history and was not on any medication. Her otolaryngologist (ENT) could not find any physical reason for the patient’s acute unilateral deafness, including a negative CT scan. She was being referred to me to determine if there was an ...

Read more...

Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 40-year-old woman is evaluated for a rash on her hands that has been present for 6 weeks. This rash comes and goes throughout the year and has been present for many years, but never as severe as it is now. She also experiences itchy skin on her body. She had eczema ...

Read more...

Last year, Dean Dupuy, 46, an engineer at Apple, suddenly died of a heart attack while playing hockey. He experienced no warning symptoms and, with a healthy, active lifestyle, did not fit the profile of someone at risk. Too late to save him, Dupuy’s wife Victoria discovered that early coronary disease can be identified by simple CT scans. She recently launched a nonprofit organization, No More Broken Hearts, in San ...

Read more...

The fact that childhood cancer is, thankfully, a rare disease belies the fact that it is the leading cause of disease-related death in U.S. children, age 1 to 19.  The fact that it is a rare disease also belies the fact the number of people with a direct stake in expanding research into pediatric cancer is quite large and extends well beyond the small number of children with cancer and ...

Read more...

Nobody, it seems, is comfortable with death. In Haiti, where death and life are fluid concepts, where voodoo curses and ghosts are spoken of as fact rather than fiction, death is comfortably present. The dead are buried in mass graves throughout the country, victims of political crime, violence, malnourishment and infectious disease. There, life can be drained from a healthy person in a matter of hours for lack of clean ...

Read more...

What Mayor Thomas Menino taught us about cancer Beloved and deeply respected Boston mayor Thomas M. Menino died on hospice in Brigham and Women’s Hospital recently.  Menino developed advanced cancer of unknown primary (CUP) in the spring of this year, and after six months of chemotherapy, he elected to stop active treatment.  Reportedly he was comfortable, and surrounded by friends and family at the time of his death.  The press, the ...

Read more...

A new study from surgeons at UCLA found that laparoscopic cholecystectomies done at night for acute cholecystitis have a significantly higher rate of conversion to open than those done during daylight hours. Nighttime cholecystectomies were converted 11 percent of the time vs. only 6 percent for daytime operations, p = 0.008, but there was no difference in the rates of complications or hospital lengths of stay. The study, published online in the ...

Read more...

171 Pages

Most Popular