Facebook Page or Facebook Profile, what doctors need to know

Now I am going to confess my bias – I am fast becoming a Facebook junkie! As an entrepreneurial physician who has to keep feeding and nurturing a business, I sense Facebook’s huge potential and I’m eager to learn how to participate effectively in this brave new world.

Both Twitter (an instantaneous but fleeting stream of chatter mixed in with pointers to valuable resources) and LinkedIn (a searchable Rolodex on steroids) have their uses, but for sheer sociability and ease of sharing, and scanning messages to catch up on friends and news items, I don’t believe that Facebook has an equal.

The stats for 2010 are staggering:

  • More than 500 million active users
  • 50% of Facebook’s active users log on in any given day
  • Average user has 130 friends
  • People spend over 700 billion minutes per month on Facebook
  • There are more than 150 million active users currently accessing Facebook through their mobile devices

What does this mean for you, if you have a practice or a business and want to develop a following and perhaps even relationships with people who have actively chosen to be your friends or to “like” your Page?

Oh, and by the way – do you know the difference between what most people call Facebook, and a Facebook Page?

In case you don’t, here’s the low-down:

The first, usually termed “Facebook” actually refers to your personal Facebook Profile. A Profile can only be owned by an individual, not a business. You have all kinds of privacy settings with your Profile, and depending on how you set the privacy, the content on your profile is not searchable by Google and other search engines.

A Facebook Page, on the other hand, is considered public and is searchable via the search engines. These are the things that people “like” (they used to be called Fan Pages). Depending on how you set up your Page, it can function almost like a mini website, with a Welcome landing page, newsfeed, a tab for your blog if you choose to have your blog posts delivered directly to Facebook, and any other tabs that you choose to set up. A Facebook Page is a great place to “create your Brand” and to demonstrate your business’s or practice’s personality!

Most of the information that is being discussed on a recent Facebook Summit refers to Facebook Pages.

Here are some of my key takeaways from the Facebook Summit so far, taken from the Twitter stream that is occurring during the conference. I hope you’ll find them useful, or something to chew on and digest:

  • RT @Mike_Stelzner: The goal is not to be good at Facebook, but to be good at business because of Facebook
  • What makes an Influencer? Someone who provides interesting relevant content to his or her audience to stimulate interaction
  • The 5 Ps of marketing by @briansolis : Product, Price, Place, Promotion and People w/ People at the center of it all
  • “Like” is an explicit form of endorsement (a stamp of approval) of a brand that you are communicating to your social network
  • RT @marismith: When visitors click the Like/Recommend button on your site/content, you’ll be discoverable through Facebook search
  • To increase “sharing”, K.I.S.S. (keep it short and simple). Tasteful humor is okay!
  • RT @MariSmith: On Facebook: Keep it short and simple. Saturday is biggest sharing day. Include more verbs than nouns.
  • RT @Mike_Stelzner: 5 FB status updates in 8 months is not enough, don’t treat Facebook like the Yellow Pages

The feeling that I’m walking away with from this conference is that Facebook is the future, much like the Internet has been the future for businesses. Up until now, we’ve been saying, “if you don’t have a website, your business or practice doesn’t really exist.”

The new mantra is going to be if you don’t have a Facebook Page, your business or practice doesn’t really exist.

Philippa Kennealy is a family physician and certified physician development coach who blogs at The Entrepreneurial MD.

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  • http://33charts.com DrV

    Important post. What’s important to understand is that independent of whether a person or doctor thinks FB is important is the fact that a half billion folks think it’s important. I started a FB feed for 33 charts and it has created an evolving stream of readers. While I live on Twitter, most of the world doesn’t (or 92%).

    Doctors should pay close attention to FB.

  • http://www.weightlosscoachingmd.com Melanie Lane MD

    Philippa is absolutely right. I am a physician entrepreneur as well, and I have the ability to communicate, share information, and spark conversation with many, many people who wouldn’t otherwise have found me.

    I procrastinated for months, thinking facebook was a waste of time and created for people who had no lives. However, in creating my business page, I now have the ability to establish a relationship with millions of people. I believe I have just barely touched the surface of facebook’s potential to drive new clients to my website, whom I hope will ultimately choose to contact me for my services.

  • http://www.aneurysmsupport.com/ Mike

    I use it to promote websites, with mixed results. It does get me some traffic, though not always the best, and some people think that the facebook page is the website (internet novices mostly) and it can be difficult at times to explain to them that Facebook is being used to promote another site. Others I do know are using it with great success and I can see it being a useful took for physicians.