Measles outbreak

Thank you antivaccinationists.

email

Comments are moderated before they are published. Please read the comment policy.

  • Anonymous

    I am old enough (pushing 46) to remember getting the usual childhood diseases as a matter of course. Sometimes, to me, fear of outbreaks of these old time favorites seems not to include memory of what it was like when these diseases were par-for-course of any childhood.

  • Anonymous

    The corrupt, evil US trial lawyer industry, in its quest for vast stolen wealth, is guilty of terrifying large numbers of vulnerable parents into refusing vaccinations of their children.

    These attorneys are mass murderers in $3000 silk suits.

  • FORCED ANARCHY

    As a victim of vaccine injuries, I am going to put in my 2 cents!

    It’s the measles get over it!

    Americans are waking up to way big pharma and the CDC have said they own the bodies of their children. Pharma and the CDC along with those who have every reason to lie are going to fight this tooth and nail!

    Measles is not a big deal, I am a collector of antique medical books, and it is interesting that measles in the early 50′s was often listed as mild, but you move forward to the 60′s when the vaccine came out suddenly it was a killer.

    Oh, and if you are going to play the 3rd world card—-People in 3rd world countries don’t die from measles, they instead die from the complications which are caused by billions of dollars being spent on vaccines instead of helping them gain healthy nutritious food—-in essence they die from a complication of malnutrition.

    You and others like you can fear monger and lie all you want but more and more BUT the fact remains, American’s are shunning the poisons from food and vaccines both for themselves and their children so get the **** over it! Measles and mumps might return but the number of people with life long vaccine injuries are going to drop! Mark my words on this.

  • Anonymous

    As you can see, it’s not just the trial bar, but more than a few morons causing the problem.

  • Anonymous

    The link shows 64 cases and fourteen hospitalized.

    21% hospitalization rate under modern conditions. Doesn’t look so great to me.

    Then again, I’m not a “film maker” and “web designer” (read: living in mother’s basement). I just practice medicine.

  • SarahW

    I had the measles at 4 years old. ( german measles earlier, I don’t remember it) I felt a little sick and fevery and sensitive to light, and then I got red spots. And ice cream.

    I have to say I’ve been sicker. It was not a big deal.

    I was healthy and well-nourished, don’t you think that helped? I wouldn’t be surprised if there is better resistance in some population groups through natural selection, perhaps that’s why we didn’t fare badly. My parents really didn’t fret about it.

    I have hard time accepting that a measles resurgence is likely or likely to be very severe… Is it outrageous to speculate that the people who get measles now are probably the people most likely to do badly? ( Malnourished, immune compromized or immune naive, and from population groups with little natural resistance?) I’d like to know more about the folks who contracted cases of measles.

  • SarahW

    FWIW, I am not an anti-vaccine person at all..
    Just a little skeptical of the necessity of panic about measles resurging in unvaccinated people.

  • Diora

    Sarah, with all due respect, just because you had a mild case, doesn’t mean everyone has. With many deseases, some people have a mild case, others more serious cases, and some end up having complications or die. Measles can have serious complications like encephalitis or eye damage, even death. Here is, by the way, is statistics from 2002 outbreak in Italy. 7.6% rate of complication is awfully high given that measles is very infectious. Almost 1 in 1000 people died – it doesn’t sound like a lot, but given how infectious measles is, if a lot of people catch it, the numbers of those not as fortunate as you will add up. By the way – the risk of complications from measles is several orders of magnitudes higher than that of vaccines.

    Then there are adults like me who have never had measles. No vaccine is 100% effective, so we need herd immunity to protect those of us who haven’t had measles as children even if we are vaccinated. In adults the complication rate is a lot higher. People like “forced anarchy” above keep saying that before the vaccines everyone got it as children – this is so not true. Not every single person got measles as kids before the vaccine was available, some got it later. There have always been adults who just didn’t catch the desease as kids. I only caught chicken pox at the age of 32, and there certainly were kids in my school who got it, I just never caught it from them. People just forget how it was before the vaccines – my mother had diphteria as a child and was hospitalized with her father who also caught it – as adult; she saw people in the same ward die including a mother who caught it from her child. This whole situation is really dangerous.

  • Anonymous

    naw it is not big deal. Let’s bring back smallpox and polio as well

  • SarahW

    Diora, I don’t deny the existence of vulnerable persons, but following up on the last comment, I don’t think red measles can be placed in quite the same category as polio and smallpox, despite its capacity to kill ( mainly through secondary infection) the malnourished and stressed, the immune compromised, and the immune naive.

    Wild measles has some risks, latent virus can cause serious illness down the road. I was immunized with measles vaccine in elementary school to prevent these. I’m not saying measles poses no risks, simply that I wonder if the population of the unvaccinated may not relflect the risk of the general population from measles.

  • Throckmorton

    I guess Forced Anarchy doesn’t realize that measles tends to make people deaf.

  • Anonymous

    Throckmorton,
    Rubella is linked to deafness and other complications in infants born to mothers who contracted the illness during pregnancy, but deafness is not likely to directly result from rubella in the person who contracts rubella ex utero. Some treatments for measles had potential for damaging hearing.

  • Diora

    despite its capacity to kill ( mainly through secondary infection) the malnourished and stressed, the immune compromised, and the immune naive.

    I don’t think it’s only malnhourished, stressed and immune compromized who are at risk – I could be wrong, if so, doctors will correct me. This is from “Encyclopedia of public health” (via this page – not sure about accuracy of this source, but I have no time to look.

    Although measles is usually not severe in developed countries, it can lead to serious complications including diarrhea (8% of cases), ear infections (7%), pneumonia (6%), encephalitis (0.1%), subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE)(0.001%), and death (0.2%). Measles is much more serious in developing countries, causing about one million deaths annually during the 1990s. The case fatality rate can be as high as 25 percent, ….

    .2% risk of death is high. Many of the drugs pulled of the market and resulting in a bunch of lawsuits had a much lower rate of complications. Not to mention that most of the popular preventive measures for chronic deseases in adults have much lower chance of benefit than preventing .2% chance of death. Yet people consider these measures a must for everyone while arguing against vaccinating their kids. Granted, it’s not like polio, but it’s not like the people who don’t vaccinate their kids pick and choose. Today it’s measles, tomorrow it’ll be polio. In some countries people had epidemics of diphteria.

    Additionally, normal healthy grown-ups are at much larger risk of complications than kids, not to mention pregnant women.

    Anon, maybe throckmorton meant to say “blind”? Just a thought.

  • Anonymous

    Measles and mumps will certainly return and vaccine complications will drop by definition if fewer vaccines are done.

    And the disease complications, more dangerous and just as permanent, will grossly outweigh the drop in vaccine complications, most of which are theoretical at best.

    Ordinarily I’d say the whole thing is Darwinian, so let them have their way. That they will degrade herd immunity does concern me some. What really concerns me is there will certainly be more litigation over failure to address rare disease in a timely manner. Rare because the disease was made rare by vaccination. So docs don’t see the disease as much.

    And of course, there will be litigation over good old “failure to warn”.

  • GG Freeman

    Forget the moms who are afraid of autism, I’ve met mom after mom who doesn’t want to get their kids vaccinated because, “Little Johnny got a little sick and didn’t feel good for a few days after he got HIS shots.”

    This kind of makes you scratch your head and say, “Measles is better than that?”

    My kids are vaccinated. I vote for bringing something deadly or at least debilitating back, polio maybe…

    You start seeing cases of that… and guess who will be screaming for return of vaccination programs…

    You guessed it… lawyers and their sheeple.

  • Saddend

    “Forced Anarchy”..I agree to a certain extent the validity of your argument. I am in my 60′s now but In my childhood the measles vacine was not available and at age 3 I caught the measles and it made me deaf. My sisters had it the same time and were fine afterwards, but there are some children, like myself, who become either deaf or blind.

  • http://roguemedic.blogspot.com Rogue Medic

    Forced Anarchy,

    As a victim of vaccine injuries, I am going to put in my 2 cents!

    I guess that means Forced Anarchy is someone who does not understand medicine, but has a lawyer attacking the medical system for something not related to vaccines. Autism is not related to vaccines.

    Measles is not a big deal, I am a collector of antique medical books, and it is interesting that measles in the early 50’s was often listed as mild, but you move forward to the 60’s when the vaccine came out suddenly it was a killer.

    Measles was often mild in the 1950′s. Measles killed 4950 Americans from 1950 to 1959, inclusive.

    Measles was often mild in the 1960′s. Measles killed 2690 Americans from 1960 to 1969, inclusive.

    Measles was often mild in the 1970′s. Measles killed 310 Americans from 1970 to 1979, inclusive.

    Measles was often mild in the 1980′s. Measles killed 63 Americans from 1980 to 1989, inclusive.

    Measles was often mild in the 1990′s. Measles killed 102 Americans from 1990 to 1999, inclusive.

    This often mild disease killed almost 5 thousand Americans during the period you want to return to.

    If only Forced Anarchy had been there to tell them, It’s the measles get over it!i

    Save us Forced Anarchy! Only you know the truth of this conspiracy, or whatever you are blaming everything on.

    Here are the numbers from Reported Cases and Deaths from Vaccine Preventable Diseases, United States, 1950-2008. This is a pdf.

    Year . . . Cases . . . . . Deaths

    1950 . . . 319,124 . . . 468

    1951 . . . 530,118 . . . 683

    1952 . . . 683,077 . . . 618

    1953 . . . 449,146 . . . 462

    1954 . . . 682,720 . . . 518

    1955 . . . 555,156 . . . 345

    1956 . . . 611,936 . . . 530

    1957 . . . 486,799 . . . 389

    1958 . . . 763,094 . . . 552

    1959 . . . 406,162 . . . 385

    1960 . . . 441,703 . . . 380

    1961 . . . 423,919 . . . 434

    1962 . . . 481,530 . . . 408

    1963 . . . 385,156 . . . 364

    1964 . . . 458,083 . . . 421

    1965 . . . 261,904 . . . 276

    1966 . . . 204,136 . . . 261

    1967 . . . 62,705 . . . . 81

    1968 . . . 22,231 . . . . 24

    1969 . . . 25,826 . . . . 41

    1970 . . . 47,351 . . . . 89

    1971 . . . 75,290 . . . . 90

    1972 . . . 32,275 . . . . 24

    1973 . . . 26,690 . . . . 23

    1974 . . . 22,094 . . . . 20

    1975 . . . 24,374 . . . . 20

    1976 . . . 41,126 . . . . 12

    1977 . . . 57,345 . . . . 15

    1978 . . . 26,871 . . . . 11

    1979 . . . 13,597 . . . . .6

    1980 . . . 13,506 . . . . 11

    1981 . . . 3,124 . . . . . 2

    1982 . . . 1,714 . . . . . 2

    1983 . . . 1,497 . . . . . 4

    1984 . . . 2,587 . . . . . 1

    1985 . . . 2,822 . . . . . 4

    1986 . . . 6,282 . . . . . 2

    1987 . . . 3,655 . . . . . 2

    1988 . . . 3,396 . . . . . 3

    1989 . . . 18,193 . . . . 32

    1990 . . . 27,786 . . . . 64

    1991 . . . 9,643 . . . . .27

    1992 . . . 2,237 . . . . . 4

    1993 . . . 312 . . . . . . 0

    1994 . . . 963 . . . . . . 0

    1995 . . . 309 . . . . . . 2

    1996 . . . 508 . . . . . . 1

    1997 . . . 138 . . . . . . 2

    1998 . . . 100 . . . . . . 0

    1999 . . . 100 . . . . . . 2

    2000 . . . 86 . . . . . . .1

    2001 . . . 116 . . . . . . 1

    2002 . . . 44 . . . . . . .0

    2003 . . . 56 . . . . . . .1

    2004 . . . 37 . . . . . . .0

    2005 . . . 66 . . . . . . .1

    2006 . . . 55 . . . . . . NA

    2007 . . . 43 . . . . . . NA

    2008 . . . 132 . . . . . .NA