Malpractice caps on malpractice premiums

Wondering whether malpractice caps work?

Neurosurgery malpractice premiums LA/Orange County: $83,000.

Contrast that to Miami: $349,000.

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  • Anonymous

    It’s all about the money, ain’t it Kevin! Finally, at least one doctor admits he’s after the extra money even if it does screw some patients. Your honesty is appreciated Kevin.

  • Anonymous

    Anon, You’re scaring the children…

  • Anonymous

    Why do people feel the need to sue their doctors?? How is money going to fix their health or bring their loved one back? (Unless they’re trying to recover the cost of the medical bills in which case it doesn’t seem fair to sue the doc.) I don’t know how things work down there…could they sue the government instead?

  • Anonymous

    They sue their doctors typically for two reasons – one, to pay medical bills (which is the bulk of most awards). Two, because their providers won’t tell them what happened and generally ignore them so they want an answer.

    But mostly #1. That’s the tradeoff for not having universal healthcare.

  • Anonymous

    Kevin, do you believe you can simply pick two locales and compare their premiums and that the only difference will be tort claims?

  • Anonymous

    So physicians are like Ipods? No difference in quality from one to the next?

    If that’s the case, let’s just make them all govt. employees, pay them a hell of a lot less, and do away with all of this fractured healthcare mess.

  • Kevin

    “So physicians are like Ipods? No difference in quality from one to the next?”

    To my knowledge, there is no appreciable quality difference in neurosurgeons between California and Florida that warrants one premium to be 4x greater than the other.

    Kevin

  • Anonymous

    Again, Kevin, do you believe that the difference in those claimed average premiums is solely due to the difference in tort awards?

    I take it you can tell us then how many neurosurgeons there are in the two locales? What companies were surveyed to determine these numbers? How much has been paid out per surgeon, etc.?

    Or are you simply trying to make a point with statistics you have a meager understanding of, like most lobbyists? Do you prescribe drugs based on that little info from drug reps?

  • Anonymous

    Yeah, asking the basis for one’s conclusion is such a distraction. I guess if you’re trying to hide the fact that your conclusions are suspect, it is frustrating to have the truth pointed out.

  • Anonymous

    So Criminal you would just ramp up the number of medical students by lowering admission standards to fix the access to care problem. Well assuming all of these new docs find residencies since those are frozen. Four years plus 5 of internship and residency. Hey you will have in fixed in 9 years! Brilliant!

  • Anonymous

    I am going bare in FL. Keeps the attorney cockroaches off my doorstep b/c no insurance money to go after.

  • Anonymous

    If that’s the case, let’s just make them all govt. employees, pay them a hell of a lot less, and do away with all of this fractured healthcare mess.

    Great, we will work 9-4 all holidays off and no call, since I’m a govt. employee. Instead of seeing 90-100 patients a day I will see 20. Ten before and ten after my 2 hour lunch break. That will completely solve the access to care problem, make physicians much much less efficient than they are today. Brilliant! Just don’t get sick after hours.

  • Anonymous

    So physicians are like Ipods? No difference in quality from one to the next?

    This is specious. The analogy is not IPods to physicians, it is IPods to insurance products.

    Is the insurance product in Florida worth four times as much as the insurance product in California?

  • Criminallopath

    Anon 1:37

    Since you have asked… Here is what I would do. Remove the CME or any other medical group from the process of certifying medical schools, decouple medical schools from large research institutions and allow for-profit medical schools. I would increase the funding for residency programs dramatically. I would shift the MDs out of the primary care business into specialties and increase the training of NPs and PAs such that they could serve as PCPs. Finally, I would start the process of either having nationalized or regionalized health care with the latter being akin to the fire or police department. Providers would either be local, state or federal employees. The pay might be less than what they are making now but gone would be the running a small business headache, liability headache and working hellacious hours headache. Along with this, I would have either the local, state of federal body pick up the total cost of the education tab for medical students in the same manner as they do with fire fighters or police officers.

  • Anonymous

    “Great, we will work 9-4 all holidays off and no call, since I’m a govt. employee. Instead of seeing 90-100 patients a day I will see 20. Ten before and ten after my 2 hour lunch break.”

    Hey! Don’t let the secret out! I work as an MD specialist in a government institution and see 20 patients per day, work out in the gym for 1 hour and then go for a 45 mins run. After all that I am home before 4pm…

    If you think that is lax, you should see what the civil servants are doing here, it is akin to highway robbery. :)

    That is the gummit for you!

  • Anonymous

    Can you say VA. Of course I think americans will be a little surprisd by their new healthcare.

  • Anonymous

    The government MD specialist back again. I forgot to mention I don’t take call and will be retiring at in 5 years at 45 years of age with a pension that rivals that of a Senator!!!

    There is the gummit for you!

  • scalpel

    “So physicians are like Ipods? No difference in quality from one to the next?

    If that’s the case, let’s just make them all govt. employees, pay them a hell of a lot less, and do away with all of this fractured healthcare mess.”

    We already have that system in place. It’s called Medicare.

  • Anonymous

    “So physicians are like Ipods? No difference in quality from one to the next?

    If that’s the case, let’s just make them all govt. employees, pay them a hell of a lot less, and do away with all of this fractured healthcare mess.”

    We already have that system in place. It’s called Medicare.

  • Anonymous

    “So physicians are like Ipods? No difference in quality from one to the next?

    If that’s the case, let’s just make them all govt. employees, pay them a hell of a lot less, and do away with all of this fractured healthcare mess.”

    We already have that system in place. It’s called Medicare.

  • Anonymous

    “So physicians are like Ipods? No difference in quality from one to the next?

    If that’s the case, let’s just make them all govt. employees, pay them a hell of a lot less, and do away with all of this fractured healthcare mess.”

    We already have that system in place. It’s called Medicare.

  • Anonymous

    Sorry. Blogger malfunction.