Botox for depression?

Apparently, you can’t be depressed if you can’t frown:

Dr. Finzi, who runs a private medical practice in Chevy Chase, Md., believes the patients felt better simply because they could not frown. “I think there has got to be some type of feedback between the muscles for facial expression and the brain,” said Dr. Finzi, whose study was published in the journal Dermatologic Surgery.

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  • Anonymous

    Maybe they just enjoyed looking at themselves in the mirror – their new “younger” look made them happy?

  • ipanema

    Perhaps another theory: it’s too stretch that it can’t be folded now. :)

  • Boop Beep Boop Beep

    I wonder what the actress who plays Chloe on “24″ feels like with all that frowling.

  • Anonymous

    Since I periodically have depression… and have a few frown wrinkles … this sounds very interesting. I originally looked into botox because my HEAD HURT. I hold all my stress in my face. It really shows. So interesting that maybe when my head feels better — I’ll feel alot better mentally.

  • Anonymous

    this could possibly be correct. I have suffered from depression for many years. And I am doing much better for the last 3 years. My daughter said to me the other day about the laugh lines around my mouth and eyes that I did not have when I was depressed. and that was before I read about Botox and depression. So I believe this might have merit

    edc

  • Anonymous

    I was interested in this because I teach yoga and when you relax your muscles, your mind also relaxes. I often tell my students to make the countenance of their faces peaceful and think of the pictures you have seen of the buddha or any saint and they are also depicted with radiant calm faces– I had also read in a yoga journal years ago that the forehead lines were a sign of depression in people.

  • Anonymous

    As a physician, I felt an immediate disbelief when I first heard of this.
    Then I remembered the vicious cycle of pain > spasm that is sometimes relieved by injecting local anesthesia into the “trigger point” of pain. Theoretically this interrupts the “pain-spasm” cycle relieving the pain.
    Why not a depression-frown cycle?

  • Anonymous

    From personal experience of two years of clinical depression I learned that depression is not a disease but a state of mind. One that we maintain with the way we think, reinforcing the way we feel which perpetuates the way we think.

    We begin to formulate phylosophies which intitutionalize our feelings of fear and sadness ( “life sucks…” ). We also perpetuate it by our posture, by shallow breathing and by frowning all the time. It’s kind of like having a contractor who building us a house (our personality) but without blueprints; our subconscious mind watches us to see what kind of a house (what kind of a personality) we want built. But this process is not logical, it is associative (classical conditioning, stimulus- response type of learning) not by reasoning. It forms identifications to patterns of moods by their frequency and inensity of feeling not by quality (what kind of feeling). Thus intense feelings of any kind, painful, pleasurable, sexual have a tendency to become habitual and more and more frequent as we filter our daily experiences through darkly-colored lenses perpetuating the feeling state which eventually becomes clinical depresion.

    The interesting question was why, what was I getting out of it. I have cocluded that we are intutively programmed to create a personality, that this work is, in fac is our Opus Magnus, the masterpiece that our conscious/unconscious mind works on during our lifetime. And this programming appears to be primary; more important than even survival itself, the mother of all human drives (demonstrated by the fact that depression can kill you.

    Finally it came to me; it is the same programming that creates our waking consciousness itself. This programming remains active as we grow older and it wants to refine it’s identifications by becoming not just consciousness but a type of consciousness- a personality. And we do this by identifying with a smaller set of feelings as we get older.

    It’s easy to see this process in some people who have obviously allowed themselves to become somewhat cartoonish, like Andy Rooney of 60 Minutes, the famous curmudgeon complaining and wondering if we have noticed that most of the cereals in the store use similar names (“Golden, Crisp, etc.”). He seems to live in a house with only two rooms, named bitching and complaining.

    And so this new treatment for depression where we prevent people from frowning for six months by paralizing our frowning muscles makes all the sense in the world. In my psychiatric practice I demonstrate to my patients that depression is not a disease by having them stand up and close their eyes. Then I ask them to remomber a moment of great happiness in their life (we’ve all had them, even if just for moments at a time). Then I ask them to put their bodies in the same position, to breathe the same as at that peak moment. Then I ask them to smile in the same manner as then. When the smile comes I ask them to open their eyes, then quickly challenge them: whithout losing the smile be sad… it’s imposible to do. Then I ask, if you had a real disease like pneumonia would a smile make it go away?

    See, depression is not a disease, it’s a state of consciousness, a state which has to be nurtured by habitual frowning, and habitual negative, self-pitying thoughts and feelings.

    Now if we could only identify the muscles that cause bitching and complaining….

  • Anonymous

    From personal experience of two years of clinical depression I learned that depression is not a disease but a state of mind. One that we maintain with the way we think, reinforcing the way we feel which perpetuates the way we think.

    We begin to formulate phylosophies which intitutionalize our feelings of fear and sadness ( “life sucks…” ). We also perpetuate it by our posture, by shallow breathing and by frowning all the time. It’s kind of like having a contractor who building us a house (our personality) but without blueprints; our subconscious mind watches us to see what kind of a house (what kind of a personality) we want built. But this process is not logical, it is associative (classical conditioning, stimulus- response type of learning) not by reasoning. It forms identifications to patterns of moods by their frequency and inensity of feeling not by quality (what kind of feeling). Thus intense feelings of any kind, painful, pleasurable, sexual have a tendency to become habitual and more and more frequent as we filter our daily experiences through darkly-colored lenses perpetuating the feeling state which eventually becomes clinical depresion.

    The interesting question was why, what was I getting out of it. I have cocluded that we are intutively programmed to create a personality, that this work is, in fac is our Opus Magnus, the masterpiece that our conscious/unconscious mind works on during our lifetime. And this programming appears to be primary; more important than even survival itself, the mother of all human drives (demonstrated by the fact that depression can kill you.

    Finally it came to me; it is the same programming that creates our waking consciousness itself. This programming remains active as we grow older and it wants to refine it’s identifications by becoming not just consciousness but a type of consciousness- a personality. And we do this by identifying with a smaller set of feelings as we get older.

    It’s easy to see this process in some people who have obviously allowed themselves to become somewhat cartoonish, like Andy Rooney of 60 Minutes, the famous curmudgeon complaining and wondering if we have noticed that most of the cereals in the store use similar names (“Golden, Crisp, etc.”). He seems to live in a house with only two rooms, named bitching and complaining.

    And so this new treatment for depression where we prevent people from frowning for six months by paralizing our frowning muscles makes all the sense in the world. In my psychiatric practice I demonstrate to my patients that depression is not a disease by having them stand up and close their eyes. Then I ask them to remomber a moment of great happiness in their life (we’ve all had them, even if just for moments at a time). Then I ask them to put their bodies in the same position, to breathe the same as at that peak moment. Then I ask them to smile in the same manner as then. When the smile comes I ask them to open their eyes, then quickly challenge them: whithout losing the smile be sad… it’s imposible to do. Then I ask, if you had a real disease like pneumonia would a smile make it go away?

    See, depression is not a disease, it’s a state of consciousness, a state which has to be nurtured by habitual frowning, and habitual negative, self-pitying thoughts and feelings.

    Now if we could only identify the muscles that cause bitching and complaining….

    PS: ipanema, if that is your photo… i love your face.

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