You don’t have to be happy to do your job well, writes Joe who is the ‘world’s most popular blogging anesthesiologist’:

“I got through medical school only by riding a combination of fear, uncertainty and well-–concealed rage at the whole process.

I left general practice after two years because I was bored to tears and devastated each night when I got home, a combination of emotional fatigue and (short-–term, I hope) brain damage resulting from listening to 30 depressed people a day tell me the somatic manifestations of their misery.

But guess what?

Every single practice I worked at during that two-–year run-–up to beginning my anesthesiology residency (which I absolutely loved every minute of, by the way) begged me to stay and become full-–time.

They loved me.”

Comments are moderated before they are published. Please read the comment policy.

  • ipanema

    “You can believe what you like but what they all told me is that I was a doctor who really cared about the patients and the patients — most of whom I’d seen only once or twice during my short stint as a fill–in — told them so.”

    I love this part. I always look for this kind of doctor – caring. It’s hard to find a doctor with both qualitites in them : compassionate and knowledgeable.

    I love doctors who know patients like/love them because it shows in their work.

    Thanks for this post, reminds me of some lovable doctors I have.

  • Anonymous

    I got through medical school only by riding a combination of fear, uncertainty and well-–concealed rage at the whole process.

    I am in medical school and I feel the exact same way… Does this mean I should go into anesthesiology?

  • Anonymous

    No my dear friend, it means you are normal. This is just the first of many unmet expectations you will have during your career. You assume there is logic and reason in the way people grade you (there is not). You assume that the sycophants in your class will be called out (they will not). You assume that if you work hard and study, people will notice (not always).

    You should go into whatever interests you, as long as it is not primary care or psychiatry. Good luck to you.

  • Anonymous

    I have to say that this post hit a nerve for me. Doctors who are egotistical and condescending push my buttons.. I cant imagine his patients would feel so happy with him if they new how he felt about them.

    I think the only reason is that he likes anesthesiology is that he doesnt have to listen to “30 depressed people a day tell me the somatic manifestations of their misery”. Illness can be produced by depression/stress and is as real as disease causes as a result of some organic process.

    I am not sure if Ipanema is being ironic or not but I can tell you that it is extremely hard to find a doctor that is both knowledgeable and compassionate.

  • ipanema

    “I have to say that this post hit a nerve for me. Doctors who are egotistical and condescending push my buttons..”

    >>>I’ve met some of these kind, I don’t go back, I move on, find others.

    ***

    “I cant imagine his patients would feel so happy with him if they knew how he felt about them.”

    >>>Well, he won’t be happy as well if he knew what patients are saying about him.

    ***

    “I am not sure if Ipanema is being ironic or not but I can tell you that it is extremely hard to find a doctor that is both knowledgeable and compassionate.”

    >>>True, it’s hard to find this combination. But I did.

    Out of 15 doctors I’ve been to(3 operations + other illnesses), he’s the only one I’m close to.

    ***

    We can say anything about other people and vice-versa, but when you’re a sickly person, you can’t be thankful enough to find some people who’s helping you recover, and yes…even if you pay them, even if it’s their job. I am just like this. I try to see good in people. Just don’t cross me. :)

Most Popular