As seen on Medrants, trial judges go to school to learn about medicine:

Dr. Calvo said the goal is to show judges that most of human biology and medicine is not black and white.

And judges at the first round of classes said they learned exactly that. In addition to acquiring a scientific knowledge base, judges said they learned that understanding physician-patient communication is key to interpreting complex medical cases.

Now, if only there was a course for jurors and lawyers – it would go a long way to solving the acrimonious physician/lawyer relationships.

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  • Anonymous

    Any more pompous self-congratulatory bromides from Kevin Pho and he’ll kill us all. It’s not that jurors and lawyers don’t understand the difficulties and risks of medicine. It’s that they understand too well the sloppiness, mafia-omeurta, deceit, and self-protection that characterizes doctors.

  • LoverOfAll

    Anon 8:26pm,

    I rate your post a 2 on a scale of one to ten. Your exaggeration in sentence one is mildly humorous. Your non-chemical usage of the word “bromide” was inspired.

    Unfortunately I had to deduct points for your usage of the word “mafia-omuerta” because I don’t know what it means and can only assume that you made it up. You also lost points for your generalizations that all jurors and lawyers understand the intricacies of medicine and for your characterization of doctors.

    Overall your post was the opposite of constructive, and I hope that in the future you attempt to add something of value to the discussion. I gave you a two, because I saw a lot of untapped potential within you.

    Love Always,

    Uncle Chippy

  • Anonymous

    I wouldn’t even give his/her uneducated biased post a 1 out of 10. What is wrong with judge’s understanding that medicine isn’t black and white? Nobody (including reasoned doctors not the “sodomite hater” doc on this website) would argue about malpractice about amputating the wrong limb, removing the wrong organ, or missing an obvious ST elevation MI in a hypertensive diabetic having “crushing” chest pain. The problem is most “malpractice” cases are not nearly as cut and dried (or “black and white”). Human being’s are not legal briefs. Throw on top of it “medical experts” that tailor that statements based on who is paying their bill (for plantiff AND defense) and you may have a case as clear as the Mississippi after a storm. Frankly, I think the more “understanding” with respect to medicine by the legal system, the better it will be for everybody. Maybe someday we can even look at health courts (I am not holding my breath on that one).

  • Anonymous

    When do you think we’ll get some understanding about the legal system by physicians?

  • Anonymous

    Actually it’s “omerta.” It describes the Mafia code of honor that you don’t rat out the family.

    “I don’t know what it means and can only assume you made it up.” Wow, what an inspired and creative leap of logic. Definitely worth a couple of points.

    The majority of lawsuits hinge on technicalities and interpretation of the evidence. In that respect, malpractice is no different from the thousands of other cases that go through the court system every day. You’re no more entitled to special treatment than anyone else.

  • Anonymous

    “The majority of lawsuits hinge on technicalities and interpretation of the evidence.”

    The majority of life hinges on “interpretation of facts”. What constitutes a “technicality”?

  • Anonymous

    “When do you think we’ll get some understanding about the legal system by physicians?”

    What does this pointless statement have to do with the legal system inability to understand medicine is not black and white?

  • Anirban

    The majority of life hinges on “interpretation of facts”

    Well said .To add when techinicalities take over the fact you get the perfect legal system as ours, only the complexity of which keeps lawyers in business.

  • Anonymous

    “What does this pointless statement have to do with the legal system inability to understand medicine is not black and white?”

    Have you ever made a true statement?

  • Anonymous

    “When do you think we’ll get some understanding about the legal system by physicians?”

    Well, I’m not a lawyer, yet, but I’m board certified in Ob/Gyn and have 2/3 of a law degree completed.

    Here’s a joke one of my law professors offered in class one day.

    The devil wanted to offer a weekend pass to heaven to some deserving residents of hell, so he called in a philosopher, a mathematician, and a lawyer.

    A simple question was asked of each. The correct answer would get a weekend pass to heaven.

    The question: What is one plus one?

    The philosopher stated that since he was a nihilist the answer didn’t really matter, but if the devil insisted on an answer, it was 2. OK, weekend pass.

    The mathematician replied that since we were dealing with prime numbers, excluding other possibilities, the answer is 2. 2nd pass.

    Enters the lawyer who was asked the same: What is 1 plus 1?

    The lawyer walks around the room closing all the curtains, closes the door, then leans over the table and says in a low voice: What do you want it to be?

  • Anonymous

    “Have you ever made a true statement?”

    And yet another POINTLESS statement. When oh when will you ever have a point to make.

  • Anonymous

    hmmmm, I thought it was CFOs who were supposed to make that statement, when interviewing for a position?