Thanks for educating this old-school cardiologist about blogs. He still seems a bit closed-minded though:

Said the doc, what would I write about? Why would I want to do that? All sorts of things, said I. Information about new happenings in the field, how to cope better, a little about you and your staff. And your patients can comment back to you. Since there are lots of docs and people have a choice who they can go to this would give you a competitive advantage. People would really appreciate who you are and understand what makes you different and special . . .

I don’t want to give them that information. There’s too much on the internet already, the doc declared. Great opportunity to make sure they have correct information, I replied. But they don’t need to know all that, he proclaimed. It would only confuse them. Besides there are not too many physicians, in fact there are not enough. And I’m too busy now. I don’t need any more patients.

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  • Toby

    Thanks for the shout out to Diva Marketing. Your blog is a great example of how healthcare professionals – especially docs – can leverage blogs to build patient relations. Thanks to *you*!

  • Cindy

    If this BLOG is one that can build patient relations, we’re in BIG trouble!

  • diora

    Well, if we ignore posts of one very angry ER doctor, this blog gives plenty of information.
    1. We can learn that we need to question every test a doctor wants to do.
    2. We can learn that in many cases we can say “no, thanks” to a doctor without geopardizing our health.
    3. We can learn that not every mistake or delay in diagnosis is malpractice. BTW, I’d be much less likely to believe “expert witnesses” now than in the past.
    4. We can learn not to believe every medical news reported in the media.

    Mind you, I’ve known most of it, but there were a number of things I learned from this blog as well.

    It is also very useful to read doctors’ take on medical news.