The NY Times on the mysterious world of medical bills. “Suppose you walk into a restaurant, and you don’t get a menu, you don’t get any choice of what food you’ll eat, they don’t tell you what it is when they’re serving it to you, they don’t tell you what it’s going to cost.

Then, weeks or months later, you get a bill that tells you all the food you ate and the drinks you had, some of which you remember and some you don’t, and although you get the bill, you still can’t figure out what you really owe.”

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  • KipEsquire

    Then again, if you were moments away from dying of starvation when you were wheeled into the emergency kitchen and had employer-subsidized food insurance and tax-advantages “flexible food accounts,” then maybe the Times’ hypothetical wouldn’t sound so bizarre after all.

  • Greg P

    But what about trying to run a restaurant when your customers come in, order, get their food, but pay nothing (maybe a co-pay of $1).
    Then weeks later some third party decides what was justifiable intake, takes a discount for the things it will pay for.

  • Anonymous

    Odd, why would you ask doctors and patients about coding and billing? I didn’t see anywhere in that article where someone talked to a coder… or a biller… you know, the people who actually know what all that stuff means? The people who know the difference between a copay, coinsurance and a deductible? What 80/20 means? What a carve-out is? The difference between “supplemental” and “complement”?

    Might as well have done an article about how quantum physics should be described in primary-colored blocks because all of the kindergardeners interviewed couldn’t explain it adequately.

    There’s only one reference in the entire article that makes sense. The person who knew where her towel is had the entire problem sorted in a matter of days.

  • Anonymous

    Odd, why would you ask doctors and patients about coding and billing? I didn’t see anywhere in that article where someone talked to a coder… or a biller… you know, the people who actually know what all that stuff means? The people who know the difference between a copay, coinsurance and a deductible? What 80/20 means? What a carve-out is? The difference between “supplemental” and “complement”?

    Might as well have done an article about how quantum physics should be described in primary-colored blocks because all of the kindergardeners interviewed couldn’t explain it adequately.

    There’s only one reference in the entire article that makes sense. The person who knew where her towel is had the entire problem sorted in a matter of days.

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