Kent Bottles on the malpractice crisis. “Physicians are perceived by the public as over-promising and under-delivering when it comes to health care. Perhaps part of the problem is that we have been so successful at treating some acute conditions, that patients live long enough to suffer from the chronic conditions that we do not treat as effectively.”

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  • dr john, (f.p.)

    Gotta love it: a pathologist lecturing us on bedside manner.

  • Anonymous

    “… another example of how the public needs to be wary of expertise..”

    This pathologist claims expertise in doctor/patient relationship and apparently has no background to be an expert in that field. And he tells us to be wary of so called experts.

    “Perhaps part of the problem is that we have been so successful at treating some acute conditions, that patients live long enough to suffer from the chronic conditions that we do not treat as effectively.”

    A statement not supported by facts. My personal experience with patients is that they are frustrated with their chronic medical condition and do not necessarily blame the health care system for their condition. Most patients with chronic medical problems such as COPD, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, CVA,
    CHF, Chronic Renal Failre, Cirrhosis, etc are well informed of the limitations of the current state of medicine to cure their problems.

    ” We may not all be Master Physicians, but we can emulate them and be as humble as they are. It just might prevent us getting sued.”

    The implication is that humble doctors get sued less than arrogant doctors. The insurance companies know better. It is the specialty of that doctor and which state he resides that corellate with malpractice lawsuits.

    I do not claim expertise on
    malpractice or doctor/patient relationship. Kent Bottles is certainly entitled to his opinion.
    His claim of being an expert on these issues smells of arrogance rather than humility. The contradictions are obvious in his article.

  • Anonymous

    All I want to know is: How do I get into pathology? They have a much lower malpractice rate than my current specialty (EM) and they don’t do nights or weekends. They live longer.

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