Ever wonder what patients think of when you see them in the hospital?  Here's the answer, in this powerful video from the Cleveland Clinic.

shutterstock_118491940 I used to be a surgical resident in the U.K. One day, I was a little dispirited during a brutal call, and my senior resident asked, “Do you love surgery?” “I like surgery,” I replied. “If you don’t love surgery, love it unconditionally I mean -- like loving your child -- you will be unhappy.” He warned. I really liked surgery. I like radiology. ...

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The whole thing was rather awkward. I have to admit that I was nervous. I perused the records before he walked through the exam room door. These conversations were always difficult and felt out of place in the office. But I had looked at the numbers over and over again. There was a glaring deficiency that had to be corrected. I planned to jump in right away, but we got sidetracked. He ...

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shutterstock_89752360 I went to the doctor yesterday, my semi-annual visit, as it were. These days I see a nurse practitioner, a woman. Recently, she and the practice she is a part of moved into a renovated building, state-of-the-art, they are calling it. It almost sparkles in its newness. The practice is owned by one of the large hospital corporations in our city. See ...

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shutterstock_134719667 Some months back I read an interesting interview with Jonathan Skinner, a researcher who works with the group at the renowned Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care. More than anyone else I can think of, the people at the Dartmouth Atlas have studied and tried both to understand and to explain the amazing variations we see in how ...

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“A thousand times we die in one life. We crumble, break and tear apart until the layers of illusion are burned away, and all that is left, is the truth of who and what we really are.” The coronary care unit (CCU) rotation is a unique place. Postoperative cardiothoracic surgery patients among many other pathologies from heart failure to heart transplant fill the unit, and it is the job of the ...

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I just stepped out of the administrative building at medical school and hear a big commotion. I look over and see an elderly male slouched on the ground bleeding profusely from his mouth and nose.  Blood is soaking the front of his collared shirt and pooling on the ground. Bystanders are making a scene and not sure what to do. I drop the items I'm carrying and calmly approach the man and ...

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medpagetodayFrom MedPage Today:

  1. Sudden Infant Death Risk Greater in Mountains. Babies born at a higher altitude faced a greater risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
  2. Delayed Dx in Psoriatic Arthritis Worsens Damage, Disability. Patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who delayed seeing a rheumatologist by more than 6 months were more likely ...

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shutterstock_74535430 I like to think that doctors are still a profession made up of people who want to help others. Sure, there are other benefits to our jobs. The technical challenge, the intellectual rewards, the financial security. But honestly, we do really get a lot from helping others. It's satisfying to look to your fellow man in a time of need and heal ...

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big-fish Health care consolidation affects every area of health care.   What does this radiologist-illustrator think about it?  I think it speaks for itself. James Chang is a radiologist and author of Oh Doctor, The Places You Will Go… He blogs at Poor MD and can be reached on Facebook.

Rarely are health care professionals given the opportunity to truly ponder a crucial aspect of patient care; the truth behind what it feels like to lie in a hospital bed, vulnerable, disoriented, and stripped of every basic human dignity. I have spent over 300 days as a patient in hospitals and more than three decades in and out of doctor’s offices and testing facilities. I have a profound respect for ...

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shutterstock_141411661 I didn’t really notice him standing in line. But how could I? Hundreds of kids came through the high school gym yesterday. His turn for the heart and lung portion of the high school sports physical had come. He said he was going to play baseball and basketball. How could he with that arm he carried so carefully? I am not ...

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Draping a shroud of 30's Depression on any dust bowl child can thicken the skin, so my 88-year-old patient learned to be fiercely independent with a “talk to the hand” attitude, and “don’t get in my way” personality.  Even after her husband passed away, she remained autonomous traveling and golfing in her social circuit. Living life as a smoker was always a threat to her health, and this year became a ...

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shutterstock_164925521 I keep getting served a Facebook ad from the American Association of Medical Colleges imploring me to ask politicians to fund residency training for medical school graduates.  The link leads to a webpage with neat graphics and a series of well-designed cartoons dramatizing an ominous shortage of 90,000 doctors expected to occur by 2025. Now, the notion of “doctor shortage” by itself is meaningless. ...

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shutterstock_205431067 What is it like for physicians to fail their ABMS Maintenance of Certification® (MOC) program examination? How does the largest member board of the ABMS, the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), respond to doctors who fail their secure examination? As I continue to confidentially collect information from physicians who have failed their MOC examination, I thought it would be important to publish ...

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shutterstock_150037820 Lately I've had the opportunity to work in an outpatient clinic where the regular doctor is out sick for a prolonged period of time. It is a breathtakingly beautiful little community, with green hills and a crystal clear river. It is also troubled by methamphetamine and prescription drug abuse. The little clinic in town is unwittingly a partner in this crime. Like ...

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If you were a cancer center trying to get patients to come to receive care at your facility, what message would you send them? In other words, what would you as a cancer center director think people would value in choosing a place to receive cancer care? One way to answer this would be to survey cancer center directors. You could conduct face-to-face interviews or written surveys. You could hold focus ...

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shutterstock_195635468 I was driving to work the other day, and there was a story on the radio about the Congressional reaction to the latest recommendations for breast cancer screening from the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). Here’s the background. USPSTF published recommendations in late 2009 for the use of screening mammography in different age groups. For women between 40 and ...

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A new clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics is a rare beacon of coherent thought about lice and children. Rather than humiliating children and driving them away like lepers, the AAP recommends common-sense steps to identify and treat lice. Some facts really shouldn’t be in dispute:

  • Lice is not a serious illness or a significant hazard to health. They don’t make anyone sick, and they do not spread any ...

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shutterstock_59443372 The other day, a teen patient of mine told me she is pansexual. We were having the usual talk I have with teen patients, the one where I we talk about sex and sexuality and birth control and sexually transmitted infections. But over the past few years, that conversation often takes interesting turns when I ask about sexuality, like it did the ...

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